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Sunday, August 2
 

15:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Get the most out of Agile2015 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2015, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Sunday August 2, 2015 15:15 - 15:45
Potomac 1/2/3

18:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Get the most out of Agile2015 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2015, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.





Sunday August 2, 2015 18:15 - 18:45
Potomac 1/2/3
 
Monday, August 3
 

08:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Get the most out of Agile2015 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2015, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.





Monday August 3, 2015 08:15 - 08:45
Potomac 1/2/3

09:00

Awesome Superproblems (Luke Hohmann)
Abstract:
The agile values and practices we all hold dear give us more than the ability to tackle problems associated with software development. They give us the ability to tackle Awesome Superproblems. These are problems that are bigger than an one person and get worse through inaction. However, when we make progress on solving Awesome Superproblems we find that new patterns that can be applied to solve classes of similar problems.
In this keynote Luke will show the collaborative, social, and serious games that have their roots in the Agile Community have blossomed into multidimensional frameworks that are being used by agilists around the world to solve awesome superproblems. Without any special superpowers except a willingness to try.
Luke is the Founder and CEO of Conteneo, Inc. Conteneo 's collaborative frameworks and data analytics helps enterprises optimize decision making. They span areas of strategy, innovation, business agility and market research. Luke is also co-founder of Every Voice Engaged Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that helps citizens and governments tackle technical and wicked social problems.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac A/B

10:45

Thank God it's Open Friday (Corinna Baldauf)
Abstract:
What if people in your company shared their knowledge? What if you could turn drab meetings into high energy sessions? What if you could gather everyone you needed to discuss a problem without hassle and breaking their flow? What if you could try out new technologies easily?
What would you be willing to do to gain the above? We reach it by investing 10% of our time to hold an Open Space every other Friday. We're still thrilled with the results!
Come to this experience report if you'd like to know what challenges we faced and what benefits we reap now.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Inspire people to introduce slack time and give Open Space a try:
  • * Present a possible solution to the "No one in a Scrum team ever has time to work on tasks they think are important, if PO doesn't offer them to pick for sprint" problem
  • * Show a failed and a successful implementation of slack time
  • * Highlight the benefits of slack and recurring Open Spaces
  • My learnings from the 5 year journey toward slack:
  • * Slack time is great: positive energy; improved flow of information; benefits of tweaks that no PO would ever have prioritized but are supernice once you have them; further education - we employees train each other in new technologies ("Vagrant 101"), old technologies ("Show me your best bash trick") and the occasional unrelated topic ("Gardening") - In short it's a big staple in the "learning organization" endeavour
  • * We needed a little more structure (=Open Space) to reap the benefits. Our first unstructured attempt (just a "free" day) tanked pretty badly and wasn't even motivating
  • * Giving slack to everyone, not just devs improved communication and collaboration immensely. Got a problem? Probably only until next OF
  • * A lot less meetings - Many regular meetings to groom upcoming epics as well as ad-hoc meetings (eg to figure out an occasional but persistent bug) have become high energy Open Space sessions with only those people who are actually interested
  • My main takeaway is that for us the benefits of everyone being available on the same day every other week far outweighs the costs of that day. Instead of "Oh no, I potentially need people from 6 different teams to solve this, whenever will I catch them?" (Never!), today it's just "No problem, I'll just pitch a session next Friday" (Problem as good as solved).
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Corinna Baldauf

Corinna Baldauf

Developer, sipgate
Corinna Baldauf has filled every Scrum role there is and is happiest as a developer. She's interested in lean, agile, systems thinking, communication, leadership & UX. Her best known contribution to the agile community is Retromat (plans-for-retrospectives.com). She hopes that one day Wall-Skills.com will also be well known.


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Potomac 4

10:45

Introduction to Agile: The Genesis (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What is this thing everyone calls Agile? If you have been doing software development a different way your whole career you may be wondering why should I change, what’s so different? In this introductory talk we will define why Agile is more than a process or methodology; it’s really a different approach to doing software development. To provide some additional context we’ll also:


  • Look back at how the Agile methods and practices emerged

  • Discuss the Agile Manifesto and 12 Principles and their resulting impact on the way that we do software development today

  • Describe what it’s like to work on Agile Project

  • Describe what you can do next Monday to get started



Learning Outcomes:


  • Tbd





Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

10:45

Tribal Leadership for Agile Teams (Steffan Surdek)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The book Tribal Leadership introduces five stages that represent a range of behaviors that tribes (ie.: groups of 20 or more people) act and think together. These stages range from Stage 1 where "Life Sucks!" to Stage 5 where "Life is Great!". Most software development teams (and most workplaces) live in the three stages in between.
This talk takes group development model presented in Tribal Leadership and helps coaches, scrum masters, team leaders and managers better understand some of the behaviors they may see every day in their agile software development teams. Participants will experience and explore the stages in various ways such as through music and an interactive game called "Guess that Tribal Stage".
"Steffan's work really brings together the worlds of Tribal Leadership and Agile software development in an interesting way. I think highly of him and how he brings these worlds together in a clear and simple way."
Dave Logan, co-author of the NY Times best-selling book Tribal Leadership
Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this talk, the participants will be able to:
  • * Identify the five cultural stages through language and relationship structures
  • * Recognize the dominant cultural stage in their teams
  • * Use a basic tool set to help team members evolve through the stages
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steffan Surdek

Steffan Surdek

Senior consultant, Pyxis Technologies
Steffan Surdek is an organizational coach and trainer at Pyxis Technologies. As a coach, he strives to create engaged teams led by inspiring and empowering leaders for the sake of making the software development workplace fun again. Mr. Surdek has worked in IT for over 20 years in collaboration with many distributed teams around the world. He speaks at many conferences and user groups about leadership and agility with distributed teams. Mr... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 4/5

10:45

Improvisssssing With Agile (Paul Goddard)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Collaboration is considered a fundamental part of "being agile" but how can you help your team understand HOW to collaborate? "Improvising" is not really about being funny, or panicking when things go wrong. It's a simple process that groups of actors follow in order to create interesting stories and scenes without the aid of a script. This session will show how the five 'secrets' of improvisational theatre can support an agile team's growth and also give you some practical guidance on how to get your team's collaborative and creative juices flowing from the very start!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees have learned some basic agile principles around collaboration and listening
  • Attendees have learned how to run some basic improv games in their own teams
  • Attendees have a five principles to summarise the ethos of improvisational theatre
  • Attendees have realised how collaboration and creativity come hand-in-hand
  • Attendees have had some fun and made some new friends
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Goddard

Paul Goddard

Agile Coach, Agilify
Paul is the founder of Agilify, has been an active Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) since 2006, and also became only the fourth UK-based Certified Scrum Coach (CSC) in 2011. From developer to ScrumMaster, and from ScrumMaster to Agile Coach he has been working with agile development teams since 2000.Paul was part of the coaching team which took on one of the largest agile transformations to date in a major UK telecoms company in 2003 and since... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 5/6

10:45

The Secret Sauce of Agile - A Culture of Great Meetings (Laura Burke, Jean Tabaka)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Spreading Agile to the rest of your organization requires the wisdom of your teams. You can reveal this wisdom through servant leaders and neutral facilitators. In this session, participants move through several aspects of collaborative meetings by practicing in small teams as well as with the entire group. You will leave with 25 simple tools and techniques that you can take back to your organizations to support truly collaborative cultures.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learning Outcomes:
  • - 25 facilitation tools and techniques to prepare and run collaborative meetings
  • - tips for balancing the input of introverts and extroverts
  • - subtle ways that keep a room “safe” for new ideas
  • - why it’s critical to gather the wisdom of the room before converging on a decision



Speakers
LB

Laura Burke

ScrumMaster, Ipreo
As a ScrumMaster at Ipreo, I work with mobile development teams spread across two states and three countries. Every team wants their product on a phone or tablet, so I get to partner a lot of teams and R&D leadership to improve our alignment and agility. | | Past experiences in the Agile world include time as a ScrumMaster at Appia and as a facilitator of corporate planning and trainer of "Collaboration Explained" at Rally Software. Talk to... Read More →
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you work with amazing people who want to do the right thing, why wouldn't you want to give it your best? My good ol' conviction in the power of facilitation and... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10/11

10:45

Old Code, New Tricks (Scott Ford)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
For most developers, the majority of their day involves interacting with code that someone else wrote. Working with legacy code is almost inevitable in today's development landscape, yet most of us have a negative outlook on working with existing codebases. This negativity is baked into the language we use. We work on 'legacy projects', 'dirt field projects', 'rescue projects', 'antiquated projects', 'ancient projects', while newer projects get labeled as 'greenfield' and 'blue sky'. In this talk, M. Scott Ford, Founder and Chief Code Whisperer at Corgibytes, a consultancy that specializes in working on legacy projects, shares his perspective on how you can learn to not only tolerate, but appreciate what he calls 'software remodeling'. You’ll walk away with specific techniques for working with older codebases, a new vocabulary to describe existing projects, and a framework for determining when you should re-write versus improve your project.
Learning Outcomes:
  • For most developers, the majority of their day involves interacting with code that someone else wrote. Working with legacy code is almost inevitable in todays development landscape, yet most of us have a very negative outlook on working with existing codebases. In this talk, M. Scott Ford, Founder and Chief Code Whisperer at Corgibytes, a consultancy that specializes in working on legacy projects, shares his perspective on how you can learn to not only tolerate, but appreciate what he calls “software remodeling.” You’ll walk away with:
  • •Specific techniques for working with older codebases
  • •New vocabulary to describe existing projects
  • •A framework for determining when you should re-write versus improve your project
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 8

10:45

Team practices applied to how we deploy, not just what (Abigail Bangser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
In an agile environment of quick project starts and even quicker deadlines, teams are being asked to deliver value to customers faster. Our team succeeded in delivering all the requested business value in time, but still had a huge hurdle to jump at the end - actually releasing the product to our customers!
Businesses think that they do not need to know (or care) about the “technical” decisions of their teams, such as how a product will actually be released, or how the release procedure itself will be tested. This is not only wrong; it is dangerous for the company's bottom line. When technical release decisions are contained in a technical team silo, we are only using half our teams’ skills and risking delivery to our end users.
We all know managers do not just want problems raised; they want solutions proposed. Learn to clearly articulate delivery risks to the business and also mitigate the risks through proven practices applied in new ways.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Clearly articulate delivery risks to businesses when technical decisions are in a separate silo from business decisions
  • Leave with concrete ways to mitigate risks through proven practices applied in new ways
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Abigail Bangser

Abigail Bangser

Quality Analyst, ThoughtWorks
Abby Bangser has had the opportunity to work in a variety of domains, countries, and team dynamics over her tenure as a consultant with ThoughtWorks. While the challenges of each domain and tech stack have varied, she has always found that the key to any quality product is the collaboration between the technical and business teams. | | Over the last couple of years Abby has had the opportunity to join fantastic line-ups of speakers at... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 12

10:45

The Magic Carpet Ride: A Business Perspective on DevOps (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Having problems convincing your stakeholders to try DevOps? Confused about how DevOps can work at scale? Or even just wondering where to start with DevOps? Don’t worry you aren’t the only one!
Imagine being the business owner of an application that was the complete antithesis of Continuous Delivery i.e. no delivery ever! Ok that might be a slight exaggeration. Let’s just say the realisation of benefits from projects developed on this application were few and far between.
You are presented with Agile - a silver bullet - and you wait, and you wait and you wait, but the magic doesn’t happen. Eventually someone starts a conversation about “agile technical practices”, finally you know the spell to cast to make the magic carpet fly, or so you would think…..
If you want to hear the rest of the story you will just have attend this session. Set in the context of an Enterprise Data Warehouse, this session will tell the story of how a scaled agile adoption created the case for change and subsequent implementation of DevOps practices. This tale from the trenches will provide insights into both the mistakes made along the way and the ideas that made all the difference, in completely transforming the delivery capability of the organisation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Techniques for getting business buy-in to DevOps initiatives.
  • Approaches for funding DevOps initiatives.
  • Pitfalls to avoid when implementing DevOps.
  • Success factors likely to enable success with DevOps.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Partner, Context Matters
Em is a Partner at Context Matters, Australia's leading Enterprise Agile consultancy. After close to 20 years in business management roles within multinational blue chip corporations, Em discovered Agile and became passionate about the chance it provides to align business and IT around the delivery of value. In 2012, she launched Australia’s first Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Agile Release Train. The story of the cultural transformation that... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 6/7

10:45

Navigating the Complexity of Organizational Change (Jason Little, Declan Whelan)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Einstein said "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them" yet many organizations that want to adopt Agile end up using existing organizational structures to make it happen. That is, they create a centralized team to roll Agile out, define metrics, create a dashboard, communication and training plan and finally a Sharepoint site to push the change outwards. The outcome ends up being another failed Agile transformation story because people either resisted change or they failed to change their organizational culture.
This isn't an 'Agile' problem, it's a structure problem. The real issue is that organizational structures are designed to serve the internal purposes of the organization, not their customers or the value they create for their customers.
In this session we'll explore real organizations that are thriving by structuring in radically different ways. That includes apply the concepts of dual organizational operating systems, de-centralized networks, structuring around value streams, horizon planning and full-on organizational explosion.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - how to identify strategies and tactics for implementing meaningful organizational change
  • - how to deprogram yourself from the assumptions you have about how to change your organization
  • - takeaway concrete practices you can apply tomorrow



Speakers
avatar for Jason Little

Jason Little

Leanintuit
I started my career as a Cold Fusion developer of all things. Then I upgraded to ASP. Both languages are still better than any new fangled framework today. Then I realized I wasn't all that good at it so I went into management and eventually into consulting. Now I'm an author and international speaker who is bridging the gap between Agile practitioners and Organizational Development and Change Management practitioners.
avatar for Declan Whelan

Declan Whelan

Leanintuit
Helping organizations improve value steams and their organizational structure.



Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 1/2/3

10:45

Government Product Owner: What to expect when they’re expecting (Salah Elleithy, Darren Hoevel)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What is the product owner role? Is it different in the federal space and the commercial space? What are the challenges that the PO face? If we were to define a PO persona, what would it look like? Does a conventional PO role work in the government? What changes are needed to enable the PO in the government? How would the PO role apply in the government settings? Does the organizational structure affect the PO role?
The product owner role is one of the most demanding and critical roles on agile projects. The PO is engaged with the stakeholders (those who will be impacted by the product) as well as the development (delivery) team (those who will be delivering the product).
The PO drives the vision of what needs to be built. The PO describes the vision to the team that is translated into chunks of value (or user stories) that makes up the Product backlog (a “to do” list of what needs to be built). The team works with the PO to clarify questions. Once the team build a chunk of value, they demonstrate it to the PO who then accept it or provide feedback that then get translated into more user stories.
Common challenges include: proxy PO, part time PO, supporting multiple teams, misconceptions of the PO role and limited empowerment among other challenges.
In this session, Salah and Darren will share stories about the challenges of the PO role in the government, explore different approaches through a collaborative session that will give participants ideas on what to look for to make the PO role successful in the government.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * Understand the roles and responsibilities of the Product Owner
  • * Define a persona for Product Owner
  • * Explore different ways of applying Product Ownership in the government space
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Salah Elleithy

Salah Elleithy

Agile Coach, SparkAgility
Salah gets the most joy out of sparking curiosity in learning and experimentation. Throughout his journey, he has held roles in business analysis, project management, product management, agile coaching and management consulting. Salah is passionate about enabling organizational agility and enhancing team capabilities. His work entails helping organizations in designing a community (culture) of learning. Salah is the Founder and Learning... Read More →
avatar for Darren Hoevel

Darren Hoevel

Agile Junkie, Cultural Renovator, Customer Ambassador, Pliant Solutions
Darren Hoevel is a passionate Agile realist, organizational change advocate, corporate cultural renovator, customer ambassador and founder of Pliant Solutions. He is driven by transforming organizations into self-managing, self-organizing teams with high morale. Darren prides himself on being not just a coach but a leader, helping team members achieve success on an individual level through a collaborative environment which, in turn, contributes... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Three Keys to Self-Direction and Leadership (Christopher Avery)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Self-efficacy is the belief in one's competence to produce expected results. Research shows self-efficacy is highly correlated with self-direction and leadership. And, most importantly, self-efficacy can be developed.
Effective application of three mental tools (often unconscious tools with which you are already equipped) develop self-efficacy, self-direction, and leadership. Each of these mental tools can be brought into clearer consciousness and exercised like a muscle so that you become increasingly effective and confident in your abilities to lead yourself and others. And each has been widely studied and documented as an important aspect of leadership.
The three keys are intention, awareness, and confront:
  • Intention means to want, believe, and expect that you will produce an outcome or result. Many models of personal leadership development are built on the power of intention (think of vision or goals, for example).
  • Awareness means that you examine, know, and understand yourself in relation to others and the environment. Awareness is the first key to change. Developing self-awareness has been, and remains, the number one approach to leadership development.
  • The second leading approach to leadership development is progressive challenge, aka, to face or to confront. Confront means to be present and centered with one's uncertainty, fear, or anxiety while stretching into new experiences that allow new discoveries and abilities to unfold. Leaders confront impediments and opportunities.
In this session you will learn to access, apply, and develop your mental powers of intention, awareness, and confront. You will learn to combine them to take ownership of opportunities and to break through problems -- so you have more confidence in yourself, and so others will want to follow you.
Learning Outcomes:
  • After this interactive session, you will be able to
  • Relate intention, awareness, and confront to leadership of self and others.
  • Access your mental powers of intention, awareness, and confront more directly and consciously in times of opportunity or challenge.
  • Understand and have tools to deal with what get's in your way -- what get's you stuck -- when you are trying to use your intention, awareness, and confront.
  • Have language and concepts you can use to discuss, make agreements about, and develop self-direction and leadership in your teams.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery

Author and CEO of Partnerwerks, Inc., Partnerwerks, Inc.
I help people find, embrace, and master their natural leadership ability. Author of "The Responsibility Process: Unlocking Your Natural Ability to Live and Lead with Power" and the classic "Teamwork Is An Individual Skill: Getting Your Work Done When Sharing Responsibility." CEO of Partnerwerks, Inc., distributor of The Responsibility Process® products and services. Host of The Leadership Gift™ Program, for a better, more productive way... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

10:45

Learning 3.0 - Relearning to Learn (Manoel Pimentel Medeiros, Caio Silva)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
New concepts and techniques are emerging throughout the industry and all this has to be learned quickly. But, if we are going through a (r)evolution of concepts in fields like management, marketing, organisational design, business and software development, the same cannot be said of learning. Workers, teams and organisations are still trying to get to grips with those new concepts through old methods; with that, they can memorize theory but they don’t learn how to put that theory into practice in the real world of work. By looking at this new reality, we have to relearn to learn, redefining the relationship between learning itself, space and time. We'll have to merge learning and performing in order to make it happen continuously. We need new concepts, new habits, and we need to practice new learning tools. This is undoubtedly a revolution, which we call Learning 3.0!
This session will explain What is and How Learning 3.0 works. You will also Taste Learning 3.0, by living its dynamics and applying one of its tools.
To understand the gist behind Learning 3.0, we'll take a look over the existing models of learning, from completely prescriptive to completely emergent. We will also see how Steven Johnson's Artificial Emergence concept is applied to Learning 3.0 core, covered by the elements of dialogue, egalitarianism, multiple perspectives and non-expert based.
Last but not least, this session will promote an in-depth experience about emergent and collaborative learning. For this reason, we'll apply a tool called Learning Canvas, designed to facilitate and centralize all conversations during the process of emergent learning. This tool is completely problem-driven - that means the entire content of the canvas will be pulled by the problems or by its symptoms. We expect you to experience how this powerful learning concept, along with its tools, is able to help you solve complex problems on your Agile team or on your organisational Agile adoption journey :-)
(Learning 3.0 is a concept developed by Alexandre Magno during the writing process for the book How Creative Workers Learn, and supported by Happy Melly Network. Caio and I are Licensed Facilitators of Learning 3.0.)
Learning Outcomes:
  • Differences between pull and push learning
  • What is emergent learning
  • What is Learning 3.0
  • How to create a collaborative environment for Learning 3.0
  • How to use the Learning Canvas
  • How to apply the Learning Canvas to help an Agile Team or an organization
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Manoel Pimentel Medeiros

Manoel Pimentel Medeiros

Agile Coach, Elabor8
Manoel works as Agile Coach at Elabor8 (elabor8.com.au). He has more than 18 years’ experience in IT contexts, where he was integral in helping the Agile Transitions in large and complex organizations. | Manoel is one of the pioneers of the Brazilian agile community. He was one of the founders and active organizers of Agile Conferences in Brazil. He spoke at national and international conferences. He is the founder of Visão Ágil (Magazine... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 3

10:45

A (Story Map) is worth a thousand words (Elliot Susel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Manage project scope from ideation to delivery by using a story map. They’re quick to make, easy to maintain, and perfect for explaining your project to others. Elliot will introduce the fundamentals, and then we’ll break off into teams to build your first story map. You’ll leave with the core concepts, resources for further study, and a killer tool to communicate your product vision.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Ability to articulate when and why you use a story map
  • Ability to create your own story maps
  • Methods for using story maps throughout delivery lifecycle to manage and communicate project scope
  • Methods for using story maps to convey level of effort
  • Methods for using story maps to plan iteration themes, and support cross-team coordination
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Elliot Susel

Elliot Susel

Head of R&D, Paid Services, AOL
Elliot Susel is the Head of R&D for Paid Services at AOL, where he is growing a team that performs lean startup-style concept validation and agile delivery for innovation projects.Prior to this role Elliot was the Acting VP of Technology at the Alexandria-based technology startup Curb (formerly Taxi Magic). In this role he transformed the technology organization from one deployment every two weeks, to an average of over 40. Elliot is a speaker... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 13

10:45

Scaling Agile Projects to Programs: Networks of Autonomy, Collaboration and Exploration (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you trying to scale your agile project to a program, a collection of projects with one strategic objective? If you do what you’ve done with one small project, you’ll get bloat. Instead of bloat or large frameworks, you can use agile and lean approaches to manage your program with small-world networks. Small world networks help each team to remain autonomous, and still collaborate and explore across the program.
The common risks for software programs are how to manage the interdependencies, how to nurture the architecture, how to see the status, and how to release an entire product. When we ask feature teams to collaborate and take responsibility across the organization, the teams can manage many of the interdependency and architecture challenges. With program management, we can see the status and release the entire product.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * How to scale out, not up, to create effective programs
  • * How the teams can self-organize to small-world networks
  • * How deliverable based planning and short deliverables can help a program with agile and non-agile teams
  • * How the program manager is a servant leader and what the program manager does
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. She is the current agileconnection.com technical editor. Johanna is the author of several books including: Agile and Lean Program Management: Scaling Collaboration Across the Organization... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac D

10:45

Stalwarts: Ron Jeffries and Chet Hendrickson (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ron Jeffries and Chet Hendrickson

Ron Jeffries is one of the authors of the Agile Manifesto, coached the first Extreme Programming team and is a Certified Scrum Trainer. He is the owner/operator of two of Agile’s most prolific web sites, RonJeffries.com and XProgramming.com. His most recent book is The Nature of Software Development, released early in 2015. He is an outspoken supporter of technical improvement and excellence in Agile Software Development. Despite his sometimes gruff demeanor he is often thought to be a teddy bear at heart. We can neither confirm nor deny this belief.

Chet Hendrickson has been involved with Agile Software Development since 1996, when as a member of Chrysler’s C3 project he helped develop Extreme Programming. In 2000, Ron Jeffries, Ann Anderson, and Chet wrote Extreme Programming Installed. It detailed XP’s core practices, how to do them, and how they work together to help teams be successful. Since 2002, Chet has been an independent consultant, coach, and trainer. In 2009, he was asked by the Scrum Alliance to help develop the Certified Scrum Developer program. Chet and Ron Jeffries taught the first CSD course and continue to offer them in the United States and Europe. He has been a Certified Scrum Trainer since 2009.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.


Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.













Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 2

10:45

Learn like a Scientist: Designing Experiments Using Lean UX (Will Evans)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The challenge for any company is creating products customers actually want, reducing cost, and eliminating waste in the process. The lean thinker does this in part through experimentation. Teams practicing LeanUX inside of organizations embracing Agile have developed a set of principles and methods for experimentation based on collaboration, customer research, problem space exploration, set-based design of solution hypotheses, and tight feedback loops. These approaches increase the optionality in the product development pipeline while mitigating risk. These principles and methods in experimental design based on the scientific method don't come naturally, but they are very useful and valuable if you are interested in increasing organizational learning, reducing risk, and delivering real value to customers.
While PDCA, A3, and LAMDA (Lean techniques that are just now gaining traction in the Agile community), have been used rigorously within operations and manufacturing, the LeanUX learning loop of Think > Make > Check > Learn applies many of these principles to designing new solutions in the context of knowledge work like software design in enterprises.
This session presented by Jabe Bloom & Will Evans, will briefly explain the foundations and context of lean product and process development and LeanUX; the basics of inductive, deductive, abductive logic, as well as hypothesis formulation and testing across multiple, concurrent designed solutions. We'll also introduce a couple of simple methods for team-based, collaborative experiment design using a variation of the A3 called the experiment canvas.
Finally, we'll draw connections between LeanUX methods and traditional lean learning loops including ideas from LPPD (Lean Product and Process Design) set-based concurrent engineering. Participants will leave with light-weight techniques they can use to run design experiments with their team the very next week.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how human-centered design can be combined with Lean in the design process.
  • Exploring the boundaries and constraints of a problem space.
  • Complexity informed design thinking and how can it help with product design.
  • Collaborative methods to increase, integrate, and iterate options?
  • The design of simple, yet robust, experiments
  • Formulation of good metrics and measurement schemas for our experiments.
  • How to measure the learning from experiments.


Speakers
avatar for Will Evans

Will Evans

Mr., Mr.
Will Evans explores the convergence of practice and theory using Lean Systems, Design Thinking, and LeanUX with global corporations from NYC to Berlin to Singapore. As Chief Design Officer at PraxisFlow, he works with a select group of corporate clients undergoing Lean and Agile transformations across the entire organization. Will is also the Design Thinker-in-Residence at NYU Stern\'s Berkley Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.Will was... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

10:45

Customer Vision for better Feedback and more Product Success! (Mario Moreira)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Effective customer feedback is both critical to adapting to customer needs yet elusive to capture well. Blundering into customer feedback activities continues to be a weakness in many Agile implementations. How do you ensure you identify the right customers, get customers to feedback sessions, and capture the most effective feedback? Keep in mind that without effective customer feedback, inspect and adapt becomes moot. How can you elevate the game? This session will help you establish a Customer Vision focused on gaining the elusive customer feedback. It will help you identify customer types via personas for your product, service, or value stream. It will help you incorporate customer types into the way you capture requirements. It will help you identify the various types of customer feedback loops that can be used. It will help you determine strategies to get customers to your feedback sessions. You will be armed with a framework for establishing a customer feedback vision with ways to get to more effective customer feedback leading to products and solutions that more closely align with customer needs. Instead of barely hitting the broad side of the "customer" barn, wouldn't you rather hit the "customer" bullseye?
Learning Outcomes:
  • The importance of Customer feedback loops in an effective Agile implementation
  • How the PO role is important to getting customer feedback
  • How to establish Personas to better understand your customers
  • How Personas can be directly input into writing effective User Stories
  • Strategies on getting customers to attend customer feedback sessions
  • Understand several levels of customer feedback and how to use them: Reviews/Demos (regular cadence with customers); One-on-One customer Demos (for specific customers); Alphas (internal or SaaS environment where external customers can get their hands-on); and Betas (customers can install and use the product in their environment).
  • How to construct a Customer Feedback Vision specific to a product, product-line, or solution
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mario Moreira

Mario Moreira

VP Client Development/Master Agile Coach, Emergn
Significant experience leading Agile Transformations focused on establishing and delivering Enterprise level Agile programs. Help organizations have a hyper-focus on identifying and delivering value, optimizing internal flow for faster delivery, and incorporating feedback to align with customer needs. | | Seasoned Agile Coach, Executive Coach, and ScrumMaster for large distributed to small colocated teams. Effective senior Engineering... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

11:30

'Exploring your Congenital Agility' or 'Why I brought my Mother to Agile 2015' (Caleb Brown)
Abstract:
What does spinning yarn, knitting, and weaving have to do with Agile? Why would a guy willingly choose to do a joint talk with his Mother at a major convention? Simply put: they were major contributors to his Agile understanding, decades before the term Agile even existed. In this talk you will hear a family history of Agility and be challenged to explore your own Congenital Agility along with notions you may hold as "Common Sense". This personal exploration will help you to thrive in that often frustrating pursuit of bringing those around you to an understanding of Agility and help you to better cope with the stresses and frustrations that seem to demoralize too many Agile coaches and champions today.
Learning Outcomes:
  • To come to an understanding of how your personal history, going back to childhood, has affected you in ways you may not even understand when it comes to your Agile thinking, and equip with you a tool to help you cope with the stresses involved in bringing Agile to folks who seem to be frustratingly resistant to the idea.
Attachments:

Speakers
CB

Caleb Brown

Collabnet


Monday August 3, 2015 11:30 - 12:00
Potomac 4

14:00

Going All In: Lessons Learned in Agile IT at Harvard Business Publishing (Elizabeth Ross)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Harvard Business Publishing is a subsidiary of the Harvard Business School. We spend a lot of time focused on promoting good management, learning best practices, and we're not afraid to undertake experiments and innovative practices to improve an organization. In 2014, the Enterprise Information Technology department went "all in" with agile for the 40+ person organization in a full-scale reorganization. It included everyone from the interns at the help desk to the CIO. The experience report will cover the goals of the change, choosing the best methods for each of the six, new cross-functional teams (both Kanban and Scrum are used), the efforts to train the teams and the stakeholders, the change from line managers to practice leads, and how we went about living into the agile principles. It will focus particularly on the challenges for the senior management team as we are playing too, including adopting a method, organizing a team, holding retrospectives, and doing a daily stand-up at the board.
Focusing on the senior management team is to share the experience that is often overlooked: how change has to happen at the senior management level as well and the best way to do it is to live it, along with everyone else. I will cover:
(1) The challenge of working with Human Resources to adopt new performance management methods (and finding ones that strike the balance between the agile principles of the team collectively and HR's requirement for individual performance).
(2) Learning to identify the real most valuable work for the management team (not just the work that we're comfortable putting on the board) and being open and honest in our report outs to the organization, and
(3) Maneuvering through the political challenges of creating Advisory Groups of internal customers and teaching stakeholders to think in terms of value instead of what's in progress, doing away with the traditional IT PM and replacing them with Product Owner/Business Analysts.
Learning Outcomes:
  • (1) Share the experience of the agile transformation (1 year in) with the focus on what management has to do.
  • (2) Share what we did, what mistakes were made, and how we learned from them.
  • (3) Discuss some of the specific challenging decisions such as: teams picking their own methods within the agile frame work; championing the change throughout the organization and particular struggles in areas around performance management/HR, and resetting expectations with our stakeholders.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Ross

Elizabeth Ross

Director, IT Business Systems, Harvard Business Publishing


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Potomac 4

14:00

Introduction to Agile: An Agile Talk on Agility (Mitch Lacey, Peter Provost)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
An Agile Talk on Agility is a highly interactive session where YOU bring the content. Industry experts Peter Provost and Mitch Lacey will use agile practices to field your questions (stories), turning them into a product backlog. Attendees (customers in the room) will prioritize the backlog and the sprint starts with your stories. We will do approximately six 10-minute sprints with a retrospective, a review and quick backlog grooming.
Why should you come to this session? Simple. You'll get the answers your looking for. This is unscripted and you control the content.

Learning Outcomes:


  • You will learn both things and stuff, but not necessarily in that order.





Speakers
avatar for Mitch Lacey

Mitch Lacey

Mitch Lacey & Associates
Mitch Lacey is an agile practitioner and trainer. He is the author of "The Scrum Field Guide", a book targeting teams adopting Agile and Scrum practices. Mitch has been managing projects for over 18 years & is credited with many plan-driven & agile projects. Mitch honed his agile skills at Microsoft Corporation, where he successfully released core enterprise services for Windows Live. Mitch's first agile team at Microsoft was coached by Ward... Read More →
avatar for Peter Provost

Peter Provost

Sr. Program Manager, Microsoft


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

14:00

Mentoring vs Coaching: Show Me the Difference (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The industry holds that both Mentoring skill and Professional Coaching skill are useful for ScrumMasters, agile coaches, and managers. Yet, the differences between these approaches is not crystal clear for most people. It's time to show more than tell. In this session, Lyssa Adkins, author of Coaching Agile Teams and a certified professional coach will Coach an audience member and Mentor another audience member on their real-life agile problems. Real people, real mentoring and coaching sessions. You will witness conversations that usually happen only behind closed doors. Along the way, you will learn the anatomy of powerful Coaching conversations and Mentoring conversations, see how these skill sets address problems in radically different ways and become clearer on when to use which.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - people see professional coaching skills demonstrated live and learn that the discipline is not about coaching the problem, but rather coaching the person.
  • - people see mentoring skills demonstrated live and learn how to keep the empowerment "over there" with the mentee, even when offering advice.
  • - people get a clear cut idea of the difference between the skill sets.
  • - people start to see when to use which skill set.
  • - people see the gap for themselves between what was demonstrated and what they are currently capable of doing.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac C

14:00

Strategy Mapping: Clear path to a successful Agile strategy (Dave Neuman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Strategy is about change and your Agile strategy is no exception. Your Agile strategy needs to describe what changes will be made, what will bring about the changes, and what the resulting value will be for the organization.
A Strategy Map – a diagram used to capture and communicate an organization’s strategy invented by Robert Kaplan and David Norton – illustrates the cause-and-effect relationships of actions and outcomes that will drive change and achieve the strategic goals of an organization. Whether you are about to embark on an Agile transformation journey or you’re currently using Agile methodologies and looking for ways to drive improvement, the process of strategy mapping is an absolute prerequisite.
Strategy mapping helps create much needed clarity around the critical and interconnected concepts of goals, objectives, and activities. Each plays an important and specific role in a well executed strategy including an Agile strategy. Thus, aligning and communicating goals, objectives, and actions you will take to arrive at the future state is critical for engagement and execution of the strategy.
Participants will walk away from this session with the ability to use strategy mapping as a tool in leading transformation and continuous improvement initiatives in their organizations. Participants will be given an overview of the strategy mapping process and will co-create a strategy map with other participants through a facilitated workshop. Participants will also see how the strategy map can be used beyond strategy development and support continuous improvement and action planning at an organizational level.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will understand the structure and design of a Kaplan- & Norton-style strategy map
  • Participants will co-create an Agile strategy map through a collaborative workshop
  • Participants will learn how a strategy map can be used as a continuous improvement tool at an organizational level
  • Participants will walk away with a tool and process to facilitate engagement and understanding of an Agile strategy



Speakers
avatar for Dave Neuman

Dave Neuman

Digital Engineering & Emerging Technologies Leader, Brady Corporation
Dave Neuman is a seasoned technology and business leader with almost 20 years of experience working with organizations of various sizes from Fortune 100 to small, regional consulting to advising startups in roles of software engineering, product engineering, consultant, IT, PMO, and management. Dave is a Certified Scrum Professional and Innovation Games Collaboration Architect with experience leading two major organizational Agile transformations... Read More →



Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 5/6

14:00

Beyond Error Handling - Using Design To Prevent Errors (Michael Feathers)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It would be easy to say that error handling is a black art in software development but that implies that there is some secret stash of knowledge out there. The truth is that we tend to think of error handling as a "lesser concern." If we know how to throw and catch exceptions, we feel that we are okay.
The fact of the matter is - we aren't okay. Error handling in applications is often a symptom of incomplete design. This workshop will focus on techniques you can use to systematically increase the robustness of code by rooting out potential errors and designing them away.
Attendees should bring laptops with a Java development environment. Attendees should also have reading-level understanding of Ruby code.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn a Model for Software Robustness
  • Understand Trusted Cores and Type Tunneling
  • Understand the connection between "Tell, Don't Ask" and Error Propagation
  • Learn Techniques for Reducing Variation at Software Interfaces
  • Acquire Guidance for Exceptions, Null Objects, and Option Types
Attachments:

Speakers
MF

Michael Feathers

Director, R7K Research & Conveyance
Michael Feathers is the Founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design. Prior to forming R7K, Michael was the Chief Scientist of Obtiva and a consultant with Object Mentor International. Over the past 20 years he has consulted with hundreds of organizations, supporting them with general software design issues, process change and code revitalization. A frequent presenter at national... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10/11

14:00

Don’t refactor. Rebuild. Kinda. (Wouter Lagerweij)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Each and every time, the situation is the same: a big, messy code-base, few (if any) tests and many production issues. It’s no accident that, when he joined what would be the first XP team, the first thing Kent Beck said was: “*Let’s scrap it!*”
Even with a world class team, these problems can be almost insurmountable. And we don’t usually start out with world class teams. Learning all the XP practices is hard enough without a Big Ball (of Mud) and Chain holding you back.
So maybe we should rebuild. But the Agile way: incrementally, iteratively, and with close involvement from the business.
Using examples from practice, I’ll show that:
  • We can set up a clear, loosely coupled architecture around the existing system, so we can replace parts while its running
  • We are then free to use all our modern practices for the new parts, and start Continuous Delivery from the first sprint
  • We can closely involve the business to surface the actually needed functionality, and build up Living Documentation in the process
  • We can get even an inexperienced team using and accepting practices such as TDD and ATDD quickly
Learning Outcomes:
  • The audience will see how extending some existing approaches to system improvement can give teams working on legacy systems renewed energy and belief (through experience) that high quality is possible.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Wouter Lagerweij

Wouter Lagerweij

Agile Coach, Wouter Lagerweij Consultancy
I love spending time with teams and organizations to figure out how to improve the way they make software, and make it more fun.To make that happen I use the knowledge and skills gathered in over ten years of experience applying Agile processes and practices from XP, Scrum, Kanban, Lean and Systems Thinking. Occasionally, I even use common sense.I work as an independent Agile Coach, mainly in The Netherlands.


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 8

14:00

Facilitating Operational Retrospectives: 'postmortems' minus the blame (J. Paul Reed)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
As organizations experience with greater concurrency and integration between their departments and move toward a continuous delivery of customer-value, failure is assured. Asking "how can failure be avoided?" isn't as useful or relevant as focusing on
  • "How does our organization react when failure occurs?" and
  • "How do we create a sustainable, actionable process for describing, exploring, and remedying failure?"
Of course, retrospectives are not new to the Agile community. But are the "end of sprint" retrospectives we know and love enough?
As organizations integrate the work being done under the "DevOps umbrella" into their Agile practices, the need for a new type of retrospective becomes obvious: the operational retrospective. (Many operations teams know this as the "post-outage postmortem.")
An operational retrospective has a number of important differences from end-of-sprint retrospectives:
  • Events can prompt them at any time, even multiple times per day in large enterprises.
  • These events can generate a lot of data for review.
  • Because they are prompted by performance problems and outages, they are often high pressure situations.
  • Unlike our team retrospectives, many different actors become involved, as cross-functional engineers swarm on problems and leadership demands to know "Why?"
Altogether, this can create a breeding ground for finger-pointing, bias, and a host of other behaviors which destroys our ability to learn anything useful from the event.
But it doesn't have to be this way.
We'll examine the current thinking on organizational and technological failure and look at tools and techniques used by other industries (transportation, construction, manufacturing) to conduct their postmortems. We'll also look at the cognitive biases that often find their way into a postmortem process and why it's important to be aware of them when conducting our own operational retrospectives.
We'll finish by looking at techniques to conduct postmortems within your own organizations, both from a process/skill perspective and from a tooling perspective, to help ensure that the results of your postmortems are incorporated back into the organization's shared knowledge for the next time there's an issue with production, not just stored on some wiki somewhere that no one remembers to look at again.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe existing models for postmortem/retrospective analysis
  • Describe the "New View" model of postmortems/operational retrospectives
  • Recognize bias (situational and social) and how they impact the retrospective process
  • Employ different linguistic structures for postmortem analysis
  • Compare/contrast other industries' postmortem structure and processes and be able to select techniques relevant to their Operations-focused postmortems
  • Familiarity with tools that facilitate the operational retrospective process and how they improve the organization's ability to act on the findings, learn, and improve



Speakers
JP

J. Paul Reed

Principal Consultant, Release Engineering Approaches
Been to BoS before? Yes Tw: @SoberBuildEng Talk to me about: Why is shipping software so hard?


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

Scaling Agile: Patterns and Anti-patterns (Monica Yap, David Grabel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Scaling Agile is risky. No matter what framework you use to scale Agile in a large enterprise, what are the patterns which lead to success, and what are the anti-patterns which lead to disasters? We invite all experienced Agile practitioners to explore and form a list of scaling patterns and anti-patterns. We will share our experience on how to create the successful patterns or avoid/resolve the anti-patterns. This is a highly interactive workshop with a goal to help the Agile community be more successful with enterprise transformations. Attendees can choose to be participants or observers.
Some of the aspects of enterprise transformations to be explored for patterns and anti-patterns include:
• Large scale planning
• Geographically distributed teams
• Agile mind set
• Agile metrics

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will be able to:
  • • identify agile scaling patterns and anti-patterns
  • • resolve the anti-patterns
  • • create the successful patterns



Speakers
avatar for David Grabel

David Grabel

Enterprise Agile Coach, Grabel Consulting Services, LLC
David Grabel is an independent agile coach helping teams and enterprises adopt agile at the team and enterprise level. This includes collocated and distributed teams. He has introduced Scrum, Kanban, XP, and SAFe at both small and large organizations. He helped develop a process for integrating Lean UX design with Scrum delivery teams. This process was rolled out to 15 UX teams supporting over 100 delivery teams around the world. Recent clients... Read More →
avatar for Monica Yap

Monica Yap

Agile Coach, Twitter
I am an Agile coach, trainer, and occasionally a speaker. I am a regular CSM, CSPO co-trainer since 2010. I like to focus on leading and coaching successful Agile teams, and help to turn teams into high performance teams. I\'m a Certified ScrumMaster, CSPO, CSP and have over 20 years of software development experience. My expertise ranges from assist in large scale Agile transformation across organization, coach development team on adopting Scrum... Read More →



Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 3

14:00

A Leaner PMO in the Federal Government (Fadi Stephan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Can a federal agency’s PMO support Agile teams that are focused on delivering working software frequently? What about all the needed documentation, reviews, and sign-offs from a myriad of groups including systems engineering, privacy, PRA and cyber security? In this session we’ll look at a federal agency’s PMO processes and the concept of minimum viable bureaucracy. We’ll explore the roles and relationship between the PMO, PM, Product Owner, ScrumMaster, and team. We’ll see how projects get initiated and the decision criteria needed to start or defer a project. We’ll walk through a lightweight gate review process and the activities and deliverables of each phase. We’ll also see how gate reviews can co-exists with a continuous delivery pipeline. We’ll share lessons learned and take a look at the challenges ahead. Come to this session to see how a lean PMO is operating in a Federal Agency.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * How a PMO can support Agile Teams
  • * Relationship between PMO, PM, PO, SM, and team
  • * Light-weight gate review process in a federal PMO
  • * Gate reviews and continuous delivery
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Fadi Stephan

Fadi Stephan

Consultant, Excella
Fadi Stephan is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Agile coach, and consultant with Washington DC-based Excella Consulting. Fadi has more than fifteen years of professional experience as a product manager, project manager, software developer, ScrumMaster and consultant at both Federal Agencies and businesses ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Since 2006, his focus has been on building high performing organizations and teams that focus... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 6/7

14:00

Leading in a complex world (Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Thanks to globalization and the emergence and wide spread of new technologies, the world has become a very interconnected place during the past decades. This change has happened and is happening at an ever increasing speed.
As a consequence, management and leadership have become increasingly challenging to deal with the resulting complexity. To succeed, traditional approaches to management and leadership are not enough. We need to continuously grow and adapt our leadership capabilities.
In this Session you will learn how to cope with this challenge. I will share stories, insights and tools that will help you to increase your leadership bandwidth, making you better prepared for leading in a complex world.
One key element is a decent understanding of Systems Thinking, Human System Dynamics and Complex Adaptive Systems theory. All these are very inspiring, yet as a leader I had difficulties to translate these into something actionable and useful in my daily life. And talking to many others (not only leaders) I found that many people share that challenge. So, in this talk you will learn about tools that enable you to deal with complexity from a leadership perspective. I will share stories about how these tools have helped me and my team. You will also learn how to embrace the mindset shift related to Agile and you will learn how to take better decisions using modern leadership approaches.
This talk is based on my own experiences as a leader in an agile transformation (2000+ people) and the great inspirations I got from working and discussing with my group colleagues from the Supporting Agile Adoption program (one of the programs sponsored by the Agile Alliance).
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand complexity.
  • Embracing an agile mindset of emergence
  • Key capabilities to cope with complexity.
  • How leaders can approach complexity.
  • Practical tools that help master complexity from a leadership point of view.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

VP, Operations and Programs, Ericsson
Growing up in the 1980s, Hendrik was passionate computer game developer and active in a computer club giving programming lessons. After getting his diploma in Electrical engineering he started at Ericsson as a SW developer and grew into technical coordination and System Development roles. A broad interest in people and management of large organizations brought him into management roles, starting as a project manager, later heading Systems- and... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 12

14:00

Games Gone Wild (William Krebs)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Enterprise Gamification. Does that sound like a contradiction in terms? It turns out we can learn a lot from the gaming culture. Gamers come together to collaborate, communicate, and optimize team performance based on metrics. What do they do that would make us better at managing our Agile Projects?
In this talk we will frame the context of 'Serious Games' such as Lego(R) for Serious Play(R), Innovation Games(R), simulations, open environments, and Gamification concepts of points, badges, and leader boards. These concepts are used both in training and operation in a variety of themes - some more creative, some more subtle and serious.
Join AgileBill as he shares what he has studied in two Master's degree programs on how core elements of gaming concepts can improve teamwork, training, and innovation for you and your group.
Learning Outcomes:
  • After attending this talk attendees will be able to
  • 1) List categories of games, examples in each category, and their potential uses.
  • 2) Compare and critique games in key categories such as platforms, open play, structured games, simulations, and gamification, online, and face to face.
  • 3) Relate the games to educational theories that support their effectiveness
  • 4) Use a game for Agile training
  • 5) Judge situations where some game formats will not work.
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac D

14:00

Lightning Talks: People (Crowd Sourced Voting) (Lightning Talks)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The purpose of the Lightning Talks Track is to provide a lightweight, flexible opportunity for speakers to share valuable information with participants. Presentations style include 7 minute Pecha Kucha style presentation and slideless 3 minute Lightning Talk.
How FACTUAL Are You? Scaling Agile Demands That You Are! (Michael DePaoli)
Jet Age Dogfights, the Dawn of Scrum (Thomas Friend)
Living an Agile Life (Johanna Rothman)
The Power Of Permission (Tim Ottinger)
The Power of "Politics" on an Agile Team (Alan Saporta)
Data for good, software for a cause, side projects for growth. (Anton McConville)
When they thought I had brain damage: The impact of expectations (Dana Pace)
Pizza and Software: A Metrics Comparison (Don McGreal)
Just-in-time Lightning Talks: If you want to give a just-in-time talk, you can sign up in Open Jam or 10 minutes prior to the start of a session.
Lightning Talk submissions can be seen here: http://agile-lightning.ideascale.com/
Learning Outcomes:


  • .




Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

14:00

How long will it take? Probabilistic forecasting for math mortals (Larry Maccherone)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
You know "collaboration over contract negotiation", right? Metrics often drive a wedge between management/stakeholders and the team, none more so than forecasting metrics. However, when you give a probability distribution as the answer to the question, "How long will it take?" instead of a single date, an amazing transformation happens. Suddenly, the team and management/stakeholders start collaborating to manage tradeoffs and risk. So, how do you generate a probabilistic forecast?
Maybe you've heard of Monte Carlo simulation. Maybe you've seen probabilistic forecasting techniques demonstrated or even used. But you just don't understand how it works. This talk is a gradual introduction of these techniques. You need to know nothing about combinations and permutations. You don't need to know how to apply complicated formulas. You need only have the ability to understand the rules to a simple strategy game.
This talk starts off explaining the simplest form of probabilistic forecasting using throughput/velocity as an example that anyone can follow. We'll then layer on more sophistication (but no complicated math) and discuss the tradeoffs of each approach along the way. In the end you'll have everything you need to understand and make use of probabilistic forecasting.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Easily understand Monte Carlo simulation
  • Do what-if analysis
  • Take explicit risks into account
  • Utilize forecasts that are presented as a probability distribution rather than a single date
  • Understand the advantages of using this approach



Speakers
avatar for Larry Maccherone

Larry Maccherone

Optimizer, AgileCraft
Larry Maccherone is an accomplished author and highly rated speaker who has regularly presented at major international conferences on Lean and Agile. He is very excited to have recently joined AgileCraft where his passion for analytics and visualization is helping AgileCraft be the best way to scale Agile. Prior to that, he led the Insights product line at Rally Software. His core area of expertise is drawing interesting insights from data... Read More →



Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

14:00

Stalwarts: Linda Rising (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Linda Rising

Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the area of object-based design metrics. She is an internationally known presenter on topics related to agile development, patterns, retrospectives, the change process, and the connection between the latest neuroscience and software development. Linda is the author of numerous articles and has published several books: Design Patterns in Communications, The Pattern Almanac 2000, A Patterns Handbook, and with co-author Mary Lynn Manns, Fearless Change: Patterns for introducing new ideas and just released in 2015--More Fearless Change. Her web site: www.lindarising.org

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.









Speakers
LR

Linda Rising

Linda Rising LLC


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 2

14:00

The Product Owner's Guide to Writing Acceptance Tests (Paul Carvalho)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Aristotle once said "Well begun is half done." User Stories need 3 C's to get the team going, not two. Don't skip the Confirmation/Acceptance Criteria!
There is help for Product Owners (or BA's) who want to write good acceptance criteria. ATDD and BDD suggest writing these acceptance tests in Gherkin notation. Given-When-Then may seem odd or intimidating at first glance, but it gets easier with understanding and practice. Writing good acceptance criteria for User Stories requires looking at Requirements in a slightly different way.. and maybe picking a tester's brain too.
Join Agile Coach and Testing consultant, Paul Carvalho, as he shares insights, models and tips to help you embrace the art of writing good tests to help get your teams started on the right track. Learn new ideas and techniques to help you get the most from your Product Backlog Refinement activities to benefit your teams and customers.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Help Product Owners write clear acceptance criteria for user stories
  • Overcome the fear of Given-When-Then format for acceptance criteria
  • What Testers should know that they don't know about how they can help their teams learn to test better
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Carvalho

Paul Carvalho

Agile Coach, Trainer, Quality Driven Inc.
Paul is a Testing expert, Agile coach, interactive teacher, Rubyist, comic relief, and efficiency enthusiast with over 20 years of experience in various domains. A Quality consultant by trade, Paul helps companies deliver world-class value. Beware: his eyes sparkle when he talks about Testing and his passion is infectious. Paul is the author of the forthcoming book \"Put Your Mind To The Test.\"


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 7/8/9

14:00

Consensus That 'Sticks' (Jeremy Kriegel)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
An important aspect of your role on a team is facilitating large and often very different groups of people. We may be generating ideas, gathering information, processing ideas, or collecting feedback. Each person has something important to contribute and the success of the project is likely related to how successfully these interactions are facilitated.
In this intense workshop, you will use variations on simple techniques that will help you extract the maximum knowledge of your participants in a democratic way that will make sure everyone feels like they had a voice in the outcome. You will work through a number of different kinds of problems with a small team. You'll brainstorm using open-ended affinity mapping, and experiment with structured mapping to answer specific questions. You'll reorganize and prioritize. In short order, you'll have a clear consensus among the group that you can act on.
Whether you are an experienced facilitator or just starting to find yourself responsible for corralling a team of stakeholders, you will benefit from this workshop. Newer practitioners will learn a new tool that you can add to your practice and experienced practitioners will get some variations and polishing techniques to improve the use of this tool in your practice.
By the end of this session, you'll have the ability to identify which combinations of techniques will be useful for whatever problems your team is facing and have the confidence to lead them through the exercise. Once you are familiar with these techniques, you will find that they are very easy to deploy with little or no advanced preparation. All you need is a surface and a pad of sticky notes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the value of broad engagement for certain decisions
  • Understand the difference between collaborative idea generation and individual idea generation and when to use each
  • Understand the difference between structured and unstructured organization and when to use each
  • Experience with multiple combinations of each variant
  • Ability to lead the exercise themselves with their own teams



Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Manager, BzzAgent
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 18 years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process. From start-ups to Fortune 100 companies, as a consultant or on an internal team, he has seen a lot of different scenarios that each required their own approach. He... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

14:00

The Customer CAN always be Right
 - Business Agility through Customer Collaboration (Aakash Srinivasan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Discover the impact of customer collaboration on Business Agility through real world examples and discover innovative techniques to engage your business partners to create a shared vision of success for your product. Be the one to drive the creation of a purpose driven culture in your teams. “Customer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation" is a fundamental value in Agile that propels early and continuous delivery of valuable software through collaboration between business and technology groups. The highest priority of an Agile mindset is to satisfy the customer with a team empowered to drive the product vision into reality. To enable this dynamic approach, the team should band together with the Product Owner and INVEST in effective User stories to realize true business Agility. Join us and uncover specific techniques for creating a Shared Vision or "North Star" for your product and experience how to walk in your customer's shoes to uncover their journey.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover the impact of customer collaboration on Business Agility through real world examples
  • Learn the importance of creating a Shared Vision or "North Star" for your product
  • Walk away with two techniques for creating a Shared Vision or "North Star" for your product
  • Walk away with a Product Owner 'Rights and Responsibilities" crib sheet that can be immediately leveraged by your organization
  • Experience how to create a Product Canvas to uncover what your customer really needs
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Aakash Srinivasan

Aakash Srinivasan

Agile Trainer and Coach, Independent Consultant
Aakash Srinivasan is an Agile Trainer, Coach and professional speaker who travels to consult Fortune 100 companies, working with enterprise management groups, executive teams and individual project teams on business efficiency, process improvements, organizational change and large scale Agile transformations in addition to providing leadership coaching and other Agile trainings.


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 1/2/3

14:45

How fudge candies catalysed feedback and engagement? Case study of successful experiment. (Krzysztof Czajka)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
This is a story about building appreciation and feedforward culture in the organization.
I am going to talk about a bottom-up experiment based on Jurgen Appelo's Merit Money, conduced in the biggest e-commerce company in Poland - Allegro Group. It is a story about learning throughout an Agile experiment to get the most out of it. Primarily the experiment was intended to challenge the existing bonus system based on forced ranking. It turned into appreciation and feedback system with some sweets involved. We will start from what needs this experiment was intended to address and see what were the obstacles in the beginning. Then see why and how it developed and what were the final outcomes of it. Then an interesting insight on how the participants liked it. Then an attempt to analyse the entire experiment and why we were sure it will be a success way before it was launched company-wide. At the end participants will see what the experiment finally turned into and how it is working in the company at the moment.
Do you feel your team could be more engaged in their work? Get inspired by this simple game, in which there are several instant feedback loops, fun, gambling and sweet prizes.
Oh, I forgot... and you'll find an answer on why we call it Fudge Candies.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Agile people: What you should consider when introducing similar kudos-like system? How to say thank you “like a real man”?
  • Managers: How to build engaged teams based on frequent internal feedback? What you should avoid?
  • Agile Coaches/SMs: Will see a feedback system example, which help build energized teams and incorporate frequent feedback from product owners.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Krzysztof Czajka

Krzysztof Czajka

Scrum Master, Allegro Group
Advocate of lean process in organizations. Fascinated by human behaviour in thinking organizations.


Monday August 3, 2015 14:45 - 15:15
Potomac 4

15:45

Liven Up Agile Learning with Code Jams (Sondra Ashmore, Jodi Jones)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
One of the biggest challenges for organizations who would like to start adopting more Agile methodologies is helping their staff (and leadership) get past the uncertainty of working in a new way and embracing cultural changes. Leaders direct them to classes, books, blogs, and conferences and yet they still are not sure what steps they need to take first or what success will look like for them. Failing fast and frequently does not sound like a positive proposition to them. After all, most leaders expect them to try it out for the first time on a project that will have a direct impact on their yearly rating and salary.
What if they could try it out on a real project that benefits their business, encourages innovation, while also providing a safe environment? Sound too good to be true . . . it’s not. At the Principal Financial Group we introduced Agile methods by introducing code jams (similar in nature to hackathons) both company wide and on individual teams that were one to three days in duration. The code jams provided a platform for them to try out some of the basic Agile methods such as Scrum, XP, and Kanban that ultimately gave them a better understanding of the terminology and value that the new methods provided.
In this session we will share how you can use code jams as an Agile education tool in your organization. We will share our lessons learned on selling the idea of code jams to upper management, describe the anatomy of a code jam, and provide ideas on how to sprinkle Agile learning opportunities into these fun and innovative events.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Introducing Agile methods in your organization in a fun and approachable format
  • Action learning
  • Encouraging Agile adoption in a traditional Waterfall organization
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sondra Ashmore

Sondra Ashmore

IT Assistant Director, Principal Financial Group
avatar for Jodi Jones

Jodi Jones

Assistant Director - IT, Principal Financial Group


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 16:15
Potomac 4

15:45

Synthesizing Continuous Deployment Practices Used in Software Development (Akond Rahman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Continuous deployment speeds up the process of existing agile methods, such as Scrum, and Extreme Programming (XP) through the automatic deployment of software changes to end-users upon passing of automated tests. Continuous deployment has become an emerging software engineering process amongst numerous software companies, such as Facebook, Github, Netflix, and Rally Software. A systematic analysis of software practices used in continuous deployment can facilitate a better understanding of continuous deployment as a software engineering process. Such analysis can also help software practitioners in having a shared vocabulary of practices and in choosing the software practices that they can use to implement continuous deployment. The goal of this paper is to aid software practitioners in implementing continuous deployment through a systematic analysis of software practices that are used by software companies. We studied the continuous deployment practices of 19 software companies by performing a qualitative analysis of Internet artifacts and by conducting follow-up inquiries. In total, we found 11 software practices that are used by 19 software companies. We also found that in terms of use, eight of the 11 software practices are common across 14 software companies. We observe that continuous deployment necessitates the consistent use of sound software engineering practices such as automated testing, automated deployment, and code review.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 16:15
National Harbor 8

15:45

Introduction to Agile Development Practice Basics for Everyone (not just Developers) (Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Tim (and his imaginary friend Floyd) take us on a tour of "how agile works."
Everyone in your project can understand the agile practices, not just the programmers!
This session goes behind the mechanics of agile processes, and mechanics of agile practices, to dig into the reasons we do the things we do.
Learn the reasons behind the ceremonies, practices, and measures.
How does your "agile" measure up?
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how agile practices work, and why we do them -- in terms that work for developers, managers, administrators, testers, documentation, and anyone else who participates materially in delivery (or just a supportive role).
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

15:45

Diagnosing and Changing Stuck Patterns in Teams (Marsha Acker)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Do you want to be able to “trust the wisdom of the group” but find it difficult? Do you ever feel like you’re having the same conversation over and over again with no real progress? Do you ever feel like you are stuck in a disagreement and not sure how to move forward?
If any of these issues are standing in the way of your work with groups and teams ‐ ‘how’ you are having (or not having) the conversation is likely contributing to your challenges. Research consistently demonstrates that team effectiveness is highly dependent upon the quality of the communication between team members. Yet it’s easy to get into the flow of daily work and be really focused on the ‘what’ in our conversations without much attention to the quality of ‘how’ we’re communicating.
As an agile coach one of the most important ways you can serve your team is to help them unlock the wisdom that exists within the team itself and have the conversations they need to have. We’ll explore a framework for learning to ‘read the room’ using four elements for all face-to-face communication. We’ll do some live practice to apply the framework to a conversation and then identify some typical patterns of “stuck” communications that can lead to “breakdowns” in teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn a language for how to ‘read the room’ and describe the structure of what’s happening in conversations
  • Explore the four elements of all face-to-face communications
  • Discuss the benefits of each element and the traps of ‘stuck patterns’
  • Discuss techniques that can be used by facilitators to create more effective conversations
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marsha Acker

Marsha Acker

CEO, TeamCatapult
Marsha Acker is a leadership and team coach whose passion and expertise is helping leaders and teams identify and break through stuck patterns that get in their way of high performance. Marsha founded TeamCatapult, a leadership development and organizational change firm, in 2005. She has over 19 years of experience designing and facilitating organizational change initiatives. Marsha believes that facilitation and coaching skills are vital to... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 1/2/3

15:45

Drive: How we used Daniel Pink’s work to create a happier, more motivated workplace (David Mole)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are you inspired and happy in your work? Do you feel motivated to give your best every single day? Inspired by Daniel Pink, we delved into the research of what actually motivates people and can now tell you the intriguing story of what we learned and how we were able to create a significantly happier, more productive, motivated workplace by focusing on Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose - the key concepts made famous by the book Drive (and the associated TED talk and online video clips).
Through a combination of research, coaching and lots of trial and error we made a range of changes to the way we worked and to our environment. Proudly, we were able to significantly increase happiness and in turn directly impact the productivity of our Agile teams (although the happiness spread into the wider workplace too!). Of course not everything worked and you will hear about the strategies that triumphed and those that (sometimes spectacularly) flopped! After hearing this talk, you will not only be able to understand what we did and why but you will also take away techniques and ideas for experiments that you can try for yourself.
Debunking stubborn workplace myths along the way, we can also demonstrate exactly what happens to an organisation when you focus on happiness and motivation as your key measures and all the other KPI’s take a backseat. Importantly this is about much more than the theory, yes we will cover that along the way, but we will also tell the story of how we have been able to strategically improve happiness and productivity at one of New Zealand’s largest organisations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The audience will:
  • - Understand the key concepts which sit behind happiness and motivation at work
  • - Understand why old fashioned thinking and myths no longer apply in the modern workplace
  • - Take away ideas and techniques for measuring happiness and understand which ones may be most applicable at their organisation.
  • - Identify and understand the overlap between happiness, motivation and Agile the principles.
  • - Understand the link between happiness and productivity with strategies for influencing both.
  • - Hear a real story of how this work has been applied at one of New Zealand's most well known businesses.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Mole

David Mole

Agile Coach, Nomad8
After speaking about Self-Selecting teams at last year's conference, this year I will be speaking about how we used Daniel Pink's work around Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose to create happier more motivated teams. | | @Molio | https://nz.linkedin.com/in/davidmole


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13

15:45

Abuser Stories: Reduce Software Vulnerabilities by Thinking Like a Criminal (Judy Neher)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We all know that User Stories capture goals from the user perspective along with their business value. On the flip side, how can we ensure we've thoroughly examined the ways in which hackers, criminals and adversaries can exploit those stories to get access to our most valuable resources: Our Data!
Abuser stories is a way to capture potential vulnerabilities in software systems, using the standard user story format. While user stories are written from a user perspective, abuser stories are written from an enemy or attacker’s perspective and describe the enemy’s mal-intent and motivation.
The session will look at the concept of Abuser Stories more in-depth. We will examine:
  • How seemingly benign functional user stories can create vulnerabilities in our software, leaving lots of opportunity for our enemies to take advantage of our weaknesses.
  • How to use the concept of abuser stories to shed some light on where these vulnerabilities can be introduced.
  • How to craft a good abuser story.
  • How to craft refutation criteria so that we can determine that the attack depicted by the abuser story is not possible.
  • How to estimate and rank abuser stories.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The participants will take away:
  • * An appreciation for how functional stories can introduce vulnerabilities we may not have thought of before
  • * An understanding between a threat and a vulnerability
  • * A way to capture predictable vulnerabilities that may be introduced into a system while coding features
  • * How to estimate and rank abuser stories in the overall product backlog



Speakers
avatar for Judy Neher

Judy Neher

President/CEO, Celerity Technical Services, Inc.
Passionate about building highly collaborative, high performing teams.


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 3

15:45

Launching MSN on Azure a Story of the 76 point checklist (Eric Passmore)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Get specific and learn twelve categories and 76 points to make any cloud service successful. Cloud services on commodity hardware are less resilient and fail more often requiring more work to build a rugged and responsive system. This checklist is the recipe that will turn any dev team into devops superstars.
As a bonus hear first hand stories of moving Microsoft's MSN service of 450 million users to Azure. Stories that will make you laugh and cry!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the specific check list to make any cloud service successful.
Attachments:

Speakers
EP

Eric Passmore

CTO MSN, Microsoft
Eric is passionate about coaching and mentoring people to be better technical leaders. He has experience leading software teams in a diverse set of cultures across Microsoft, AOL, CNET, and a few startups. During that time Eric has build global online applications supporting hundreds of millions of people. Most recently Eric and his team moved the entire MSN platform to Azure.


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

Did We Buy or Just Lease the Agile Car? (Matt Anderson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It is no secret that more and more companies are adopting Agile. The challenge is that many of them treat it like buying or leasing a car. They take the Agile car for a test drive, like how it handles and then make the purchase/lease without considering the total price of the vehicle over the lifetime of the investment.
When the Agile car is only leased, it is a business liability that has a planned obsolescence. The company throws money at a short-term problem that they will plan to replace with whatever the next model will be once the lease runs out. Maintenance and care will be invested at only at the level that meets the lease agreement. This short-term approach prevents the cultural all-in strategy that Enterprise Agile requires.
If the Agile car is bought, it becomes a capital asset. It can depreciate depending on what make and model is purchased or it can become a long-term asset that increases in value. Maintenance is included as part of the expense of ownership and is based off of the planned longevity of the asset. Corporate culture is modeled to embrace Agile as a core decision-making tenant, not just for development purposes but across the Enterprise.
Matt Anderson will discuss the common challenges that a sustained enterprise agile adoption will encounter over time and ways to overcome them to ensure the corporate Agile car stays in top condition and is an asset and competitive advantage to the company.
Based on lessons learned at Cerner Corporation, Matt will discuss how to handle sustained enterprise challenges like:
1) Re-organizations
2) Annual Planning
3) C-Suite prioritization shifts
4) Team changes
5) Burn-out and Cargo Cults
6) Suboptimization within organizations that decreases enterprise throughput
7) Leadership power struggles
8) Mergers and Acquisitions
While Kaizen is the desired maintenance approach, Kaikaku "accidents" happen that require some major repairs or restoration. Enterprise Agile has to handle both smoothly to truly be an competitive advantage. This has to be a core competency within the organization, independent of reliance on external consultants.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to:
  • Diagnose potential problems at the enterprise level
  • Determine which tool to use to perform the necessary maintenance. This goes beyond the generic "hold a retrospective" or "collaborate" answers commonly given.
  • Have confidence that Enterprise Agility is not a buzz-word or temporary fad and is attainable and worth the investment
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7

15:45

Agency and Department Adoption of Agile: Lessons Learned and Recommendations (Joshua Seckel, Jerry Frese)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Providing an overview of agile implementation within several government agencies and provide lessons learned and recommendations from that experience. This will include personal experience with DHS, IRS, USCIS, DNDO and other agencies in their agile journey. The agile journey has been different for each of these organizations and some have been more successful at adopting the agile mindset. We will draw on our personal experiences with these adoptions to make recommendations for agency wide adoption of agile practices and mindsets.
We will provide recommendations for cultural alignment, technical adoption, governance and oversight for agencies looking to transform the way that IT is delivered within their organization. We will also comment on different options for contractor and federal employee roles and interactions that make adoption and success more likely.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what has and has not worked within federal agencies adopting agile
  • Learn what lessons should and can be applied to a federal agency looking to adopt agile
  • Governance models that work inside of a federal agency for agile programs
Attachments:

Speakers
JF

Jerry Frese

Program And Management Analyst, IRS
Jerome (Jerry) Frese a Program Management Analyst at the Internal Revenue Service, is the organizer of an Inter-Agency Seminar whose purpose is to bring federal SDLC practitioners together so they can establish a network, learn about and share best practices and collaborate on new and innovative ways to support projects. Through the series of nine seminars he has worked with 33 other Government agencies fostering the implementation of agile in... Read More →
avatar for Joshua Seckel

Joshua Seckel

Chief of Applied Technology Division, USCIS
I lead the Applied Technology Division at US Citizenship and Immigration Services. That division includes architecture, independent test, quality assurance, change and release management, strategic vendor management, and agile coaches helping to transform USCIS to deliver better value to business faster.


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

Six Rules for Change (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Change is often much slower than hoped for, and more painful than anticipated. In the end, you may be left with feelings of frustration and dismay rather than the benefits you hoped for. How can we make change--whether it's adopting Scrum at the team level, or agile at the enterprise level--more successful, and more enlivening?
Through my work with many organizations, I've distilled principles for successful transformation into Six Rules for Change. These principles address both the complexity of the organization and the complexity of the human experience of change. They provide a set of touch-points to guide Change Artists as they support and enable change in their organizations.
  • Center yourself, consider the context and your connection to the people who are being asked to change.
  • Honor what is valuable about the past and what is working now. Honor the human experience of change.
  • Assess what is possible from where you stand, and who will work with you.
  • Assess the trust and advice networks in your organization. Weave intentional networks. Don’t rely only on the formal hierarchy.
  • Guide the change, and consider what aspects can evolve locally and where global principles apply.
  • Design experiments and evaluate results. Big changes scare people. Experiments help people practice and learn.
Following the principles in the Six Rules for Change can dramatically improve the chance the change you want will stick.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The Six Rules for Change, and examples of how to apply them.
  • How the Six Rules fit together and mutually reinforce each other
  • Why the Six Rules work, when traditional change models fail
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

esther derby associates, inc.


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac C

15:45

The Experimentation Mindset (Doc Norton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Among the traits that distinguish a good team from a great team is their ability to innovate. Despite the rhetoric in favor of innovation, most organizations are stuck in an implementation mindset, stifling creativity, excellence, and the resultant innovation. The experimentation mindset frees us from self-imposed constraints, allowing us to continually learn and improve. In this session, we'll talk about how we learn as individuals and how we learn as organizations. We'll take a look at some examples of the experimentation mindset happening in the agile community today and we'll talk about how you can foster such a mindset in your own organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduction to Dweck's work on Fixed and Growth Mindset
  • Introduction to Dreyfus Model of Skills Acquisition
  • Overview of Argyris' Single and Double Loop Learning
  • Implementation versus Experimentation Mindset
  • An alternative view on "Best Practices"
  • Examples of ways to foster The Experimentation Mindset in your own organization
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Doc Norton

Doc Norton

CEO, CTO2
Doc is passionate about working with teams to improve delivery and building great organizations. Once a dedicated code slinger, Doc has turned his energy toward helping teams, departments, and companies work better together in the pursuit of better software. Working with a wide range of companies such as Groupon, Nationwide Insurance, Belly, and many others, Doc has applied tenants of agile, lean, systems thinking, and servant leadership to... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Games for Learning about Conflict Resolution (Ellen Grove)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Conflict isn’t inherently a bad thing – it’s inevitable when people are working closely together on things that they care about. In fact, diverging viewpoints can bring new insights to help teams move forward and create something new. Dealing with conflict head-on is challenging for many people, yet few teams spend time explicitly considering “how will we work together when things get rocky?” Teams need to build the skills to be able to navigate through rough times together and come out with win-win solutions.
This workshop will present useful models for considering team conflicts supported by games teams can use to develop and practice conflict resolution skills. The models address underlying drivers of conflict, modes for responding to conflict, assessing conflict severity to determine appropriate interventions, and the patterns of principled negotiation. The games build on the concepts to help participants gain insight and develop important skills in a non-intimidating and memorable way.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding our own beliefs about and reactions to conflict
  • A useful model for identifying the drivers underlying conflict
  • A pattern for constructive conflict resolution based on principled negotiation
  • Games that can use with your teams to develop conflict management and resolution skills
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Grove

Ellen Grove

Agile Partnership
business agility coach, software tester, Open Space facilitator, LEGO junkie, and organizational instigator


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

15:45

Metrics: A prison or a road to freedom? (Natalie Warnert, Brandon Carlson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
In prison, individuality is replaced with conformity and you are held accountable to rules externally imposed upon you. Of course you aren't in prison, are you? Have you debated over the definition of a "Defect" vs. an "Enhancement" to reduce your defect numbers? Or justified why velocity dropped off when the team missed their commitment last sprint? If you've had conversations like these, you may be imprisoned by metrics.
A life of freedom exists, though. Freedom and team empowerment to make their own choices. Metrics take on a new life and become a continuous learning tool for the team. Teams begin to use metrics of their own to identify behaviors for improvement and highlight accomplishments. This transforms metrics from a control mechanism into a valuable tool.
Participants will leave understanding how to help teams learn from their metrics and ensure the freedom to measure the correct things. The session identifies key anti-patterns that can imprison team learning and encourage "metric-gaming" behaviors. Participants will learn the importance of a balance between freedom-promoting and imprisoning metrics, and how to identify the correct balance based on the team's maturity and needs.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to find a balance between metric imprisonment and freedom
  • How to identify metric imprisonment and freedom
  • How to gauge a metric's value or lack thereof
  • How to identify if metrics are changing the correct behaviors or creating bad habits



Speakers
avatar for Brandon Carlson

Brandon Carlson

IT Nerd, Lean TECHniques, Inc.
A self-proclaimed nerd with over 15 years of experience, Brandon has become passionate about elevating the performance of IT as a whole, and has helped numerous organizations from startups to Fortune 100 companies improve their product development and delivery systems. Brandon’s current interests include data-driven product definition/development and professionalism in the world of IT. He can be reached on Twitter and pretty much everywhere... Read More →
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Agile Transformation Coach, Salesforce.com
Talk to me about Women In Agile, Metrics, Agile UX, value mapping and Agile in large retail and sales organizations. | | Also check out the #WomenInAgile session on Sunday July 24 prior to the conference and register to attend! Be the change you want to see! https://t.co/A9rekeyuyl


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

15:45

Product Owner Team: Leading Agile Program Management (Dean Stevens)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Building a clear and effective product backlog to deliver on strategic initiatives in an enterprise attempting agile can be difficult. Now add the competing needs of other work with various stakeholders across the organization. And that’s not the hardest part. The real challenge is prioritizing and coordinating considering risks, technical viability and planning dependencies.
The Product Owner Team wrestles with these organizational challenges to provide Agile Teams with the support they need to get the job done. This team ensures the work is strategically aligned and prioritized with Portfolio Management. Only then can the team establish, maintain and coordinate a clear feature backlog for Agile Teams in a complex environment.
The Product Owner Team will improve and accelerate an organization’s agile transformation. This talk presents a proven framework for leading Agile Program Management including the roles, artifacts and activities for an effective Product Owner Team. Additionally, this talk introduces an Agile Program Management starter kit so participants can get started quickly in their own organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the goals of Agile Program Management
  • Learn the roles and responsibilities of the Product Owner Team members
  • Understand the key activities and artifacts for the PO Team
  • Understand how the PO Team provides the coaching and support that Agile Teams need to get the job done
  • Understand how the PO Team supports Portfolio investment decisions
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dean Stevens

Dean Stevens

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile
CSPO, PMI-ACP LinkedIn Profile http://www.linkedin.com/in/stevensdean/


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac D

15:45

Your User Stories Are Too Big! (Chris Sims)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Product owners often struggle to translate their big ideas into small user stories that the team can deliver in a short period of time. When a user story is too big, it is harder to understand, estimate, and implement successfully. This experiential session will give you hands-on experience with 4 simple techniques to split the large stories in your backlog into smaller stories. While there are many additional techniques, this set of four has proven itself sufficient to splint virtually any big story into smaller stories. You will work in small teams, applying each of the techniques to break some big user stories into smaller user stories.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to use four specific techniques to split large user stories into smaller, more specific stories.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Sims

Chris Sims

Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Learning Labs
Chris Sims is a Certified Scrum Trainer, agile coach, and recovering C++ developer who helps software development teams improve their productivity and happiness. Chris is the founder of Agile Learning Labs and co-author of two best-selling scrum books: The Elements of Scrum and Scrum: a Breathtakingly Brief and Agile Introduction.


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

Stalwarts: Jeff Sutherland (Jeff Sutherland)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Jeff Sutherland

Jeff Sutherland started the first Scrum team in 1993 and formalized the Scrum process with Ken Schwaber in 1995. As CEO, CTO, or VP of Engineering he has evolved Scrum in 11 of his own companies and co-authored the Agile Manifesto in 2001. Currently, as CEO of Scruminc.com he leads agile transformations worldwide while serving as Senior Advisor to Open View Venture Partners with almost a billion dollars invested in dozens of Scrum companies. The goal is to more than double investment returns using Scrum. See Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.


Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.











Speakers
avatar for Jeff Sutherland

Jeff Sutherland

CEO, Scrum, Inc.
CoCreator of Scrum


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 2

15:45

Do the tester role survive in a test infected team? (Juan Gabardini)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
In a test-infected team everybody takes part on testing and quality. So, the question is: which testing perspectives and skills the team should develop? Should some members remains as 'testers'? Are those perspectives and skills the same as in the traditional tester role?
Testers were often second-class citizens in traditional teams. When evolving to agility, some feel they should become programmers or become obsolete because, as everybody test, then the tester role is not needed anymore. In other teams, someone in the team keep the ‘tester’ tag, but it is unclear what they should do.
In this session I will present some ideas on the tester role on both traditional and test infected teams and open a discussion to answer the above questions, not as a black or white choice but as context-aware response.
We will also discuss how to bring the test mindset and skills to the whole team.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Skills and mindset in a traditional tester role
  • Skills and mindset in the tester role in a test infected team
  • Heuristics, books, and exercises to develop testing skills and mindset in the whole team.
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 5/6

16:30

99 Problems but a Coach Ain't One (Susan Evans)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Life as an agile coach is never dull with growing, shrinking, international, self-managed and completely brand new teams, to backlog management, code deployment, production support, and old school executives that want one throat to choke. It can be overwhelming to check one issue off the list yet feel that you have 99 more to address. It can feel like you are fighting a losing battle and no longer have the ability to influence anymore.
In this session, I’ll cover how I had to coach myself to see that I was making a difference and accept that a passionate agile coach was NOT one of the problems. I’ll also provide insight into how I handled some difficult and frustrating situations and ultimately used the agile principle of inspecting my job satisfaction and making adjustments for the better.
Learning Outcomes:
  • You’ll learn:
  • • When you are overwhelmed by the backlog of process things to improve, make a list of the improvements that have been made to see how far you’ve come.
  • • When you aren’t able to influence anymore, understand why and know that you can’t do it alone. Ask for help.
  • • When you don’t want to go to work anymore, write your job satisfaction acceptance criteria and strive to find an environment that meets it.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Susan Evans

Susan Evans

Product & Agile Consultant, VersionOne
Agile is tough and I thrive on coaching teams who are getting bumps and scraps along the way by mending their wounds and encouraging them to continue on. I’ve experienced agile failing fast but I’ve also experienced lots of inspecting and adapting that lead to success. As a consultant, I have the chance to share my knowledge and experience with the goal of steering clients away from failure and closer to success. As an experienced user of... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Potomac 4

16:30

Stakeholder Perceptions of the Adoption of Continuous Integration – A Case Study (Maria Paasivaara)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Continuous integration is an important support mechanism for fast delivery of new features. However, its adoption in industry has often been problematic, partly due to social challenges. However, there is little knowledge of the exact nature of the challenges, and how different stakeholders perceive the need for and adoption of continuous integration. In this paper, we describe how the introduction of continuous integration was perceived by different stakeholders in a R&D program at Ericsson. The case provided a rare opportunity to study the adoption of continuous integration in a large distributed organization. We interviewed 27 stakeholders and found differing perceptions of continuous integration: how suitable it is for the organization, how adoption should be organized, and whether it is possible to achieve sufficient quality through automated testing. These differences of perception were mainly consequences of the geographic distribution. Based on the case study, we propose three guidelines. First, understand that the product architecture has a significant effect on the adoption. However, do not let architectural problems keep you from implementing continuous integration. Second, give the team members sufficient time to overcome the initial learning phase in the adoption. Third, avoid centralizing competencies to individual sites, and invest in crosssite communication.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
National Harbor 8
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

09:00

Strategies for adopting Test Driven Development in operations (Ranjib Dey)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Operations has traditionally been the most interrupt driven part of any IT organization. But as cloud adoption kicks in, DevOps and infrastructure as a code brings in paradigm shift in IT operations, importance of code quality and other mainstream software development practices becoming integral part of IT operations. In this presentation I would share my experience on how we have successfully introduced agile methodologies in our operation team. How we have ensured our core business requirements (like high availability, scalability) were bolstered by introducing software development practices like test driven design, sprint planning, story based iterative development etc. I'll also talk about how unplanned activities like outage, newly discovered software vulnerability affect these workflows, and what can be done at the team organization level to minimize these effects. What safety nets need to be built to bolster teams confidence (and happiness :-) ), while we grow rapidly both in people side as well as in infrastructure side.

Key Learning:
  • When introducing new practices, start small.
  • Form a small but quality software part that reflect the usage of TDD techniques and let your peers, junior explore it, realize the benefit of it, before making it a convention.
  • Reduce adoption cost. Experience practitioner should pick up the high risk items first
  • Adopt and mix agile methodologies with the current practices incrementally, as and when the team feels comfortable with rather than enforcing a strict documented procedure (like ITIL).
  • Its almost always that something will fail, we cant avoid failure, but we can reduce the risk by shipping changes incrementally.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - how to adopt automated testing practices in operations team
  • - how to model and deliver strategic objectives in interrupt driven teams (like operations)
  • - how to ensure continuous learning in ever changing technological/tools landscape
  • - how to use better collaboration and communication techniques to ramp up new hires, junior candidates
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ranjib Dey

Ranjib Dey

Operations Engineer, PagerDuty
is a system administrator at PagerDuty, a hosted alert dispatch service.Along with rest of the operations team, Ranjib tries to design, deploy and maintainsystems that can withstand major outages. Before joining PagerDuty, Ranjib worked at Google, ThoughtWorks etc.In past Ranjib built container based private build/CI cloud, enabled continuous delivery. Ranjib worked bothas consultant for large scale infrastructure automation projects, as well... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
Potomac 4

09:00

Understanding Digital Cardwall Usage (Judith Brown)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
In Agile software development, key artefacts used to support the process are the User Story (usually recorded on a Storycard) and Story Cardwall (usually a dedicated portion of a wall). These low-fidelity tools work together to help teams stay focused and self-manage their projects. The need to support distributed teams and team members makes the physical Cardwall impractical and teams are therefore migrating towards digital story management tools. We conducted field studies of 8 Agile teams using digital Cardwalls, and performed qualitative data analysis to understand patterns of usages and user needs. We identify issues to address in the design of digital Cardwalls.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
National Harbor 8

09:00

Introduction to Agile Testing: Everyone Owns Quality (Lisa Crispin, Janet Gregory)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Testing on an agile team usually requires a major mindset shift for everyone. Testers who’ve worked previously in phased-and-gated environments are accustomed to testing at the very end, after all the code is delivered. Programmers who are new to agile may never have done any testing before – they’ve been paid to write production code, not do testing! As they adopt agile values, principles and practices, everyone on the team learns they should be testing early and often. How to make sense of this?
Whether you’re a tester, programmer, BA, manager or other agile team member, you’ll understand the whole-team approach to building quality into the software product. Lisa and Janet explain tried and true models your team can use to ensure all necessary testing activities are planned and executed within short iterations. They’ll explain how testers get engaged in agile development, and how agile teams get engaged in testing continually. The session introduces core practices such as using examples to create executable tests to guide development. Lisa and Janet share their experiences on how to avoid common pitfalls, and you’ll leave with a toolbox to help your team experiment with the good ways to build quality in.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • Why and how the whole team is responsible for quality and testing
  • • How testers add value to agile teams, and why it’s important that everyone on an agile team thinks testing
  • • How to improve collaboration between roles to prevent defects and build what the customer needs
  • • How to do all necessary testing activities within each short iteration, including test automation
  • • How to use examples and tests to guide development, and the role testers play
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin

tester, Pivotal Labs
Testing! Ask about the books Janet Gregory and I have co-written: _Agile Testing_ and _More Agile Testing_. I always love to talk about donkeys. See http://lisacrispin.com for more about me.
avatar for Janet Gregory

Janet Gregory

Agile Coach, DragonFire Inc.
An agile testing coach and practitioner, Janet Gregory (@janetgregoryca) is the co-author of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams, More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team, and a contributor to 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know. Janet specializes in showing agile teams how testers can add value in areas beyond critiquing the product for example, guiding development with business-facing tests. For the... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

09:00

Create Influence, On Demand (Bernie Maloney)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Want Jedi like leadership?
Come grasp why Agile teams communicate 5x+ more effectively and the underlying principles you can use to
Create Influence, On Demand
From addressing resistance to change to instilling self-direction in teams, Agile relies on Influence rather than Authority. Agile practices like co-location and standups actually amplify influence by leveraging behavior patterns built in to humans through biology and social conditions. This workshop teases apart those patterns, turning them into conscious tools for leadership through influence. Exercises take participants through the application and practice of techniques to lower resistance to communication, whether face to face or over a phone. This session is ideal for anyone seeking to tap the latent genius present in the people, teams and businesses with whom they work in order to accelerate the arrival of high performance.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will
  • • Grasp the full power of practices like standups, co-location and task boards, and how each leverages communication programming built-in to human beings
  • • Amplify their ability to influence by quickly establishing Rapport
  • • Understand How to build Rapport with both Voice and Physiology
  • • Understand How to use Rapport to Pace and Lead Teams and Individuals
  • • Practice building Rapport, as well as breaking it (helpful when pulling discussions out of ratholes)
  • • Be able to immediately apply these techniques, even when constrained to no more than a telephone call
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bernie Maloney

Bernie Maloney

Agile Coach | Accelerating Genius, Persistent Systems
Bernie Maloney is an international speaker, coach and trainer who's helped grow businesses from break even to beyond $100M. The self-directed teams he's helped build have delivered award winning electronics and services, both to consumers and to businesses. Bernie teaches Agile Product Development at Stanford Continuing Studies, drawing on over 25 years experience with firms like Bell Telephone Laboratories, HP, TiVo and Good Technology. A... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 3

09:00

Being Agile: Having the Mind-set that Delivers (Gil Broza)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you excited about adopting Agile? Have you put in place the roles, artifacts, meetings, tools, lingo, and teams? Are you then realizing the promised benefits -- happy customers, quality product, reliable delivery teams, faster releases?
Would you honestly answer "yes"? Or would your answer really be "only some of the benefits," "inconsistently," or "we did, initially"? If so, you're not alone. In most organizations, these results are due to an Agile implementation that is mechanical, rigid, and driven by tools and so-called "best practices." But Agile is much more than a process; it’s first and foremost a mind-set that permeates your actions. Without the mind-set, you cannot achieve and sustain great results.
In this talk, Gil Broza will guide you through the values, beliefs, and principles that define Agile thinking. You’ll learn how to choose Agile-minded methods, process, and practices for your needs and context. And with the deep understanding of what makes Agile work, you’ll be able to support mindful implementation and the necessary culture change.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain clarity on the values, beliefs, and principles that define Agile thinking
  • Learn how to choose Agile-minded methods, process, and practices for your needs and context
  • Support mindful implementation and the necessary culture change
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gil Broza

Gil Broza

Principal Agile Mentor, 3P Vantage, Inc.
Gil Broza helps software organizations build and lead engaged, solid, high-performance Agile development teams. He guides teams and their leaders in creating effective, humane, and responsible work environments so they truly delight their customers and make a positive impact. He is an "all-rounder", working at all organizational levels and coaching people in both technical and leadership behaviors. His new book "The Agile Mind-set" helps... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10/11

09:00

It's more than feature toggles: Enabling Applications for Continuous Delivery (Daniel Piessens)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Your team has just completed creating a deployment pipeline and moving to trunk based development, and you've discovered the next bottleneck: your application's architecture! You want to develop that next great feature, but a bug fix has to go out and you don't want to create complex branching and reduce feedback. Someone has suggested this "feature toggle" concept, but no one knows how to implement it. Your seasoned developers know that hiding code is more complicated than an if statement and insist toggles will never work. Your QA people reject the notion of toggles citing that there's no way they can test all the toggle cases during a sprint. So what do you do? Watch me explain how it's possible on a real, existing application!
In this session we'll cover how to introduce feature toggles into your application to allow for new features to be hidden until they are ready for release, regardless of if they've been deployed. We'll also show how you can introduce dependency injection and micro-services into an application to help isolate new development and cover best practices to make the most of these technologies as you iterate. Finally I'll demonstrate how automated testing at the unit test and UI test layers can assist in ensuring your feature toggles are working as you expect without a lot of manual testing.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience how to use feature toggles and related configuration mechanisms
  • Understand how to leverage dependency injection to "branch by abstraction" within your code base
  • Introduce the concept of micro-services to allow for parallel development of functionality
  • Use automated unit and UI testing to validate feature toggles
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Piessens

Daniel Piessens

Senior Software Consultant, Centare
Dan is a Principal Consultant for Centare where he passionately advocates agile principles and infects his clients with DevOps and other wonderful new ideas. Having over 15 years of experience in the software industry, Dan has architected world class enterprise applications in the transportation, insurance, and healthcare industries. He has been a Microsoft Patterns and Practices Champion since 2008 and an advisor on projects including Unity... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 13

09:00

Reflections on an 18-Month Federal DevOps Transformation (Dan Craig)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Eighteen months ago my company was asked to serve as the primary change agent during the transformation of a large, civilian agency towards agile/CD/DevOps practices. During the sales cycle our early impressions of the the client were fantastic: they had experience with agile delivery; a CIO with a history of IT innovation; leadership that already worked well with each other and a large, highly-visible NextGen effort making everyone eager to embrace any practices that could make them more efficient. What could go wrong? We learned that even under the most favorable circumstances, enterprise-wide change is not easy. It takes significant commitment from leadership and a willingness to continually revisit the people, processes and tools involved with delivering software.
This talk provides brief background on the state of the organization when we first engaged, and highlights the major successes (and growing pains!) we encountered while building an agile/CD platform, on-boarding over 100 projects and moving the agency up the DevOps maturity curve:
The Backdrop…
• Pressure to Deliver Suite of NextGen Applications
• Highly Visible Legacy Blow-Ups (CM, Deployment)
• Infrastructure & Networking issues
• Various methodologies/technologies
• No central source for CM, Development, Test or Deployment of Systems
• No shared priorities=organizational conflict
Building the Platform…
• Introducing Open-Source & Retiring Expensive Licensed Products
• Integrating Agency Tools (Selenium, LoadRunner, WebInspect…)
• Networking Considerations (DNS Names, Publicly Accessible)
• Standardizing Environments
• Moving towards the Cloud
Creating the “Platform Playbook”…
• Platform Onboarding & Project Maturation Process
• Inter-Organization Touch-points
• Piloting Migrations to the Platform
• Refactoring Process at we Learn
Shoring Up Agile Practices…
• Agile Assessments/Metrics
• Tailored Best Practices, Standards
• Training
• Codified Enforcement of Standards
• Automated Builds
Aligning the Organization…
• Ensuring Shared Priorities
o Quarterly CIO Summit (Roadmap)
o Monthly Stakeholder (Objectives)
o Weekly Planning (Stories)
• Communication (newsletter, website, brown-bags, Kanban wall)
Victims of our own Success…
• One-Size-Fits-All Pilot no longer works at more teams onboard
o Expanded Training for users at lower levels of process expertise
o Increased support for diverse technologies via plug-ins and customizations
o Large Diversity in Technologies & Target Environments
o Revised Bundling Technique
• Rising fixed costs for Administration
o Moved to LDAP Groups to offload user access
o Created Administrative Reports
o Automated Platform Deployments
• Difficulty Policing Platform Customers
o Implemented Templates (Jenkins)
o Automated Compliance & Administrative Reports
• Heavy Load at Peak Periods
o Jenkins Slaves
o Labeling
Finally, automating Deployments…
• Release bundles
o Environment Agnostic
o Release Documentation
o Traceability
• Automated deployments
o Jenkins/Scripts
o Puppet
o Ansible
Knowledge Transfer and Signs of Growing DevOps
• Puppet & Ansible can live together
• Co-Location
• Shared Dashboards
Closing\Q&A
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will leave with an understanding that:
  • • An enterprise level shift towards DevOps is difficult even in the most favorable situation
  • • People, Process and Tools are all important during transformation
  • • Process and tools become more important in organizations (i.e., Government) where contracted staff is always in transition.
  • • There will be growing pains as you move from pilot to enterprise-wide adoption. What works today will not work tomorrow. Plan for it.
  • • A solid foundation in Agile best practices is critical to the success of a lasting CD/DevOps practice
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dan Craig

Dan Craig

Director, Agile Delivery, Steel Thread Software


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac 5/6

09:00

Not Doing SAFe? No problem. Not doing these? Big Problem (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
SAFe has attracted a lot of attention. While its detractors claim it is mostly good marketing, it is actually because SAFe addresses many key issues in Agile at scale that are ignored by virtually all of the current popular approaches. This talk presents what one must attend to regardless of one's approach. It then describes how these challenges are addressed in SAFe. Participants interested in scaled Agile in general or SAFe Agile in particular will find this talk of great value.
The talk discusses the following Agile at scale issues:
  • Why using a foundation of Lean-Thinking is essential
  • Why having explicit workflow and decision policies greatly increases learning
  • Why you must build quality in with Acceptance Test-Driven Development
  • Why it is important to delivery business incrementally
  • Have architecture epics be a peer with business epics
  • How to guide business value to be delivered in a hierarchy of portfolio, program, team and why this is necessary
  • Taking a four step process to large scale implementation 1) Use a portfolio kanban system to limit work on the development teams 2) Create cross-functional teams to the extent appropriate while organizing these teams so that they can work together 3) Adopt the appropriate work flow that includes test-first at at least the acceptance level and provides a common cadence of all teams to enable continuous integration 4) Use kanban to manage WIP at the front of the value stream
  • Have an owner for the development value stream
Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of the challenges facing an organization that develops software, either as a product or for IT
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac D

09:00

Challenges for Agile in Government - “Culture eats Strategy for Breakfast” (Bob Payne, Beth Miller)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Peter Drucker is attributed with saying “Culture eats Strategy for Breakfast”. Teams and organizations in the public sector are increasingly adopting Agile delivery methods, which can come with great cultural challenges. We often forget about the human aspect of transformation. Organizations need to understand that culture is just as important as process and strategy.
Public sector culture is very unique and can be challenging to understand. We have seen that Agile transformations can be supported by organizational culture but more often than not, the existing culture kills the transformation. In this workshop, we will explore this cultural shift and develop concrete strategies within the working groups. This talk is informed not just by theory, but by our Agile coaching work within a large government program with dozens of teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • This talk/workshop will help individuals to understand cultural challenges and best navigate through them
  • Attendees will also learn to align people around and create a culture that supports Agile delivery
  • Attendees will create techniques/activities to manage the non human aspect of the transformation
  • Attendees will walk away with strategies they can apply in their transformational shifts
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Beth Miller

Beth Miller

Managing Agile Consultant, Lithespeed
Beth Miller began her Agile journey as a Project Manager turned Scrum Master in 2006. She quickly gained interest in becoming an Agile coach and made that shift in 2011. As a coach she has worked with teams, individuals and leadership on their Agile transformations, both large and small. Beth is a Certified Scrum Master, Certified Scrum Professional and SAFe Program Consultant and is seeking her SAFe Program Consultant Trainer certification... Read More →
avatar for Bob Payne

Bob Payne

VP Consulting Services, LitheSpeed
An early adopter of Extreme Programming, Scrum and SAFe, Bob has worked exclusively as a Lean+Agile Transformation leader since 1999.   | | Bob hosts the Agile Toolkit podcast and has produced over 170 podcasts, recording a variety of industry leaders and Agile practitioners. His consulting and training style is build on years of Lean+Agile experience, a MSEE in Computer Architectures for Artificial Intelligence and having grown up... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac C

09:00

Agile Productivity (Bill Wake, Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
More, faster: everybody wants that.
Low productivity makes products late and expensive, frustrating both teams and customers.
But what is productivity? Why is it so hard to measure?
Organizations want higher productivity, but use industrial-age models better-suited to assembling widgets than developing software.
We’ll explore a model that works for software teams.
Learn several ways to boost - or drag down - productivity in your projects.
You’ll walk out with concrete techniques to apply in your context.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Begin thinking in terms of impact, not output
  • Move focus from “working harder individually” to “accomplishing more together"
  • Recognize organizational habits that limit productivity
  • Discover ways to organize teams and their work to increase productivity
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.
avatar for Bill Wake

Bill Wake

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic, Inc.
Bill Wake (www.xp123.com) is a consultant with Industrial Logic, Inc. (http://industriallogic.com). Before that, he was an independent consultant from 2001 to 2007, then spent two years managing software development at Gene Codes Forensics. Bill has worked with teams in a variety of domains, including biotechnology, financial systems, web sales, and more. Hes the co-author of Design Patterns in Java and Refactoring in Ruby.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 4/5

09:00

How Managers can Nurture Teams to Thrive (Selena Delesie)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Agile transitions often fail to provide adequate guidance on how a manager fits into an Agile organization. Agile is a whole new way of work for most managers; as it requires a particular style of leadership. Your role and responsibilities need to change as the organization does. You must learn to coach, remove obstacles and model new styles of communication. In this interactive session you will learn how to flourish as an Agile Manager as you nurture your teams to thrive.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The difference between traditional management and agile management.
  • The conditions that allow teams to succeed, and how to nourish them.
  • Why and how to be a coach, obstacle remover, and a cheerleader.
  • The evolution of leadership and communication to propel Agile transformations forward.
  • How to support agile teams and senior management, while demonstrating your value.
  • How to identify and remove different kinds of obstacles that hinder agile team progress.



Speakers
avatar for Selena Delesie

Selena Delesie

Leadership & Innovation Coach, Delesie Solutions Inc
Selena is an international speaker, coach and trainer who inspires people to get lit up from within, radiate positive energy and empower everyone around them to step into their greatness. As a successful corporate manager, consultant and coach, she brings years of experience across the technology, financial, Agile, software development and testing sectors. She bridges this experience with her training in several outside-the-box modalities to... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac 1/2/3

09:00

Agile Passionfruits: Growing Agile Champion capability through a Learning Culture (Renee Troughton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Stickiness success or failure of Agile at the enterprise often comes down two key things: a passionate Senior Sponsor and the establishment of a learning culture. It can be a very simple thing to "do" Agile in teams, but once teams understand the basics it is critical that talent is fostered inside the organisation to create this learning culture. This workshop will give practical tips to identify potential champions (Agile Passionfruits) and provide a framework to grow these passionfruits through a learning focused set of activities.
Highlights of the framework for Passionfruits includes learning models and self awareness against those models, problem and solution analysis techniques, facilitation techniques, visual management and process hypothesis and experiementation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Why is a learning culture critical to success of an Agile Transformation, especially in a large enterprise
  • How to identify potential passionfruits who will one day replace Agile Coaches
  • A toolkit of activities to conduct with your passionfruits to understand learning frameworks, problem and solution analysis techniques, facilitation techniques and visual management techniques
  • The importance of social, intrinsic and 'train your peers' based led learning
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Renee Troughton

Renee Troughton

Enterprise Agile Coach, Unbound DNA
Renee Troughton is one of the most experienced Enterprise Agile Transformation Coaches in the southern hemisphere with extensive experience working in small to large organisations across many sectors including finance, insurance, superannuation, government and telecommunications. | | The author of both ‘Agile Forest‘ and co-author of ‘Who is Agile Australia and New Zealand‘, she also contributes heavily to her blog at Agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

09:00

Visioning – the Practical Art and Artful Practice of Conceiving Complex Products (Alan Goerner)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Like the weather, everyone talks about Vision but no one seems to do anything about it. Being an effective vision-holder is one of the key responsibilities of Product Owners, one they are rarely trained to perform. We think that developing a vision is easy: we show them a simple structured vision template or Product Box and say, “Fill that in!” We don’t usually show them the process, principles and artifacts that help to form that vision, in the first place, and to keep it alive and vital, in the second place.
Vision is rarely simple; it is never simple when it really matters. This talk is about the practicalities of forming, communicating and maintaining Visions for large and complex products and portfolios. The techniques described have been developed to help large agile programs to (a) evaluate the status quo and identify needs against business objectives, (b) conceive and differentiate a Future which satisfies these needs, (c) map the steps necessary to move from the Present to the Future, (d) express and prioritize these steps as epics, features and stories, and (e) establish a rhythm of keeping the vision current and of using it to guide agile planning. This talk will be a fast survey of a deep subject. Together, we will explore that strange ground that lies between Today and Tomorrow and find that there are practical ways to find a path from one to the other … and to keep from getting lost.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the fundamental challenges – and paradoxes – of creating a Vision.
  • Learn what value proposition and product positioning are and a few basic techniques to get started developing them.
  • Appreciate the interrelationship of product and architecture in forming Vision.
  • Learn how to express a Vision in term of epics, features and stories in a roadmap – and the practical limits of analysis and preplanning.
  • Discuss the consequences, for teams and organizations, of not having a good, current Vision.
Attachments:

Speakers
AG

Alan Goerner

Vice President, Agile Services & Solutions, UST Global


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 7/8/9

09:00

Stalwarts: Jeff Patton (Jeff Patton)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton helps companies adopt a way of working that’s focused on building great products, not just building stuff faster. Jeff blends a mixture of Agile thinking, Lean and Lean Startup Thinking, and UX Design and Design Thinking to end up with a holistic product-centric way of working. Jeff is author of the bestselling O’Reilly book User Story Mapping which describes a simple holistic approach to using stories in Agile development without losing sight of the big picture. You can learn more about Jeff at: jpattonassociates.com.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.







Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written code, and fast delivery isnt the secret to success, its just table stakes. Its actually deep understanding of your customers and users coupled with a desire to... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 2

09:00

Automated Testing of Mobile Apps (Karl Krukow)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Quality on mobile is a challenge! Developing mobile apps requires dealing with multiple platforms, OS versions, form-factors and resolutions, varying hardware capabilities and network conditions. At the same time, users have extremely high expectations for the mobile experience and will promptly punish with bad App Store reviews when disappointed. User expectations are set by fast-moving consumer apps such as Facebook, YouTube and Google Maps which deliver fast, responsive, quality apps with frequent release cycles.
Do you want to get started with automated testing (and perhaps BDD) while delivering on the technical challenges posed by mobile? This session is for you! The talk aims to inspire and empower attendees to start mobile test automation today -- the time is right and the tools have matured.
We set the stage by discussing the challenges of mobile quality, and argue that automation is central in scaling QA and moving towards continuous delivery. Then we show you a way forward by providing an introduction to the most popular open-source mobile test automation tools out there suitable for use with the most popular devices. We have a love for BDD and in our demos, we show how to create executable specifications for mobile apps which act as cross-platform automated acceptance tests.
If time permits, we will very briefly show how one might tackle the device fragmentation problem using Xamarin Test Cloud, a cloud-based service that provides managed access to more than a thousand mobile devices for the purpose of mobile quality assurance.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will leave with:
  • - An understanding of the importance of quality in mobile.
  • - A strong belief that professional practices can be applied in mobile too. That the tools have matured, and that automated testing, BDD, continuous integration and (almost) deployment is now viable and necessary.
  • - A way forward: how to get started today with cross-platform automated testing for mobile.
  • - Advice on technical best practices and pitfalls from an experienced practitioner.
  • - a fun experience in their backpacks ;)
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Karl Krukow

Karl Krukow

Lead, Xamarin Test Cloud, Xamarin
Karl Krukow is the Technical Lead on Xamarin Test Cloud, an innovative cloud-based service that provides managed access to more than a thousand mobile devices for the purpose of mobile quality assurance. Before joining Xamarin, Karl co-founded LessPainful, a mobile test automation start-up which created the popular open-source mobile test framework, Calabash. LessPainful was later acquired by Xamarin and became the cornerstone of Xamarin Test... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 6/7

09:00

Agile UX Design and Innovation with the 10:3:1 Process (Andrew Bragdon, Peter Provost)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Designing and building great, innovative user experiences that end users love is hard. Integrating user experience design process into Agile software development also poses unique challenges. We present a process that we have iteratively developed on the Visual Studio and Application Insights product teams at Microsoft that integrates well into common Agile software development practices, and that produces design outcomes that are highly rated by end users. The key to this process is an adaptation of the 10:3:1 iterative design loop, which deliberately explores multiple design points in the design space, and then iteratively refines and winnows these designs into a final design via several iterations. We present how to scale this process to large development teams of 180 full time software engineers that are using Agile software development practices, working in a continuous delivery mode, collaborating with a design team of 3 or more designers, based on our product development experiences. We present practical considerations that helped make this process work well at Microsoft, as well as key pitfalls to avoid. Finally, we present processes for maintaining the consistency and predictability of user experience designs across multiple agile teams working in parallel, without creating centralized bottlenecks, and while still enabling individual teams to innovate and get customer feedback quickly for iterative improvement.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn simple, reusable, and practical processes for designing and building innovative user experiences that rate highly with customers
  • Attendees will learn how to make the processes scale to large teams
  • Attendees will learn about practical consierations that helped make the process work well at Microsoft, and how to avoid key pitfalls
  • Attendees will learn processes that maintain the consistency and predictability of user experience designs across multiple agile teams working in parallel, without creating centralized bottlenecks, and while enabling individual teams to ship continuously
Attachments:

Speakers
AB

Andrew Bragdon

Senior Program Manager, Microsoft
Andrew is a Program Manager on the Application Insights team, working on developer experience. Before that, Andrew worked on CodeLens and Code Map, features that bring code visualization and insights into everyday developer work, to enhance productivity. Andrew has a background in research as well, and developed a number of information visualizations for software developers, including Code Bubbles a source code visualization that makes it easy to... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

09:45

Data Driven Portfolio Planning: Implementing the Rally ORCA tool (Deanna Miller, Micah Schwanitz)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
This session is for those involved in road map, resource and budget planning and will appeal to marketing, PMO and IT/engineering communities who desire to increase the predictability of their delivery success. Join us as we take you through a crash course of our journey in driving change all the way up to our executive levels by offering simple and transparent views of the business demand and engineering capacity and enabling easy what-if analysis. These what-if planning scenarios enabled us to show real-time results of business value that could be delivered by increasing/decreasing demand and capacity. We took the emotion out of the difficult investment decisions, created a new focus on the highest value initiatives, and even indirectly helped our scrum teams deliver quality by making it non-negotiable.
Learning Outcomes:
  • -High-level overview of ORCA capabilities.
  • -Continuous planning over multiple time horizons.
  • -Impact to the organization - transparency, trust, teamwork.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Deanna Miller

Deanna Miller

Senior Agile Manager, Elekta / IMPAC Medical Systems


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:45 - 10:15
Potomac 4

09:45

Visual Management and Blind Software Developers (Avelino Ferreira Gomes Filho, Rodrigo de Toledo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
With the popularization of Agile methods for developing and managing software projects, many organizations have been using visual management tools for planning, executing and evaluating their activities. These visual management tools range from simple information such as goals and deadlines to support all data required to represent the entire development process. The benefits are transparency, communication, engagement, simplicity and process awareness. However, these tools have a drawback: they are inaccessible to the blind. This paper presents an action research about the adoption of Agile methods with visual management by a software development team that includes a blind programmer, describing the difficulties encountered and how they overcame them.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers
avatar for Avelino Ferreira Gomes Filho

Avelino Ferreira Gomes Filho

Software Developer / Researcher, TRE-RJ / UFRJ
In 2009 I discovered Agile Software Development and since then I use Agile for everything in my life (professional and personal). Today I am Agile Developer with CSM, CSPO and CSD. I am also a MSc. Student at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). My current research is about How to improve learning using Agile Methods.



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:45 - 10:15
National Harbor 8

10:45

User group dying? Time to build a state-wide learning network! (Mark Kilby, Stephanie Davis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Is your user group struggling or are you trying to figure out how to even start a user group in your area? Find out how three agile user groups in Florida struggled to start and keep going and then turned things around by banding together. Within two years, we now have three thriving agile user groups that collaborate on everything from local user group development, statewide events and even launching other user groups! We’ll talk about some of the different challenges these groups faced, some of the different ways they overcame those obstacles, and how we built a state-wide learning network: AgileFlorida.com

Learning Outcomes:


  • How to avoid some common pitfalls to start and maintain a local agile user group

  • How to reach out to other user groups in your state for mutual benefit (whether they are an agile user group or not)

  • How to build a learning network that can collaborate on multiple types of agile events for mutual benefit.

  • How to share a common vision but have each user group in your learning network operate differently





Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Davis @iamagile

Stephanie Davis @iamagile

Agile Leadership Director, Valpak / Cox Target Media
Stephanie Stewart is Director of Agile Leadership at Valpak, a Cox Target Media company. As Director of Agile Leadership, she is responsible for championing, governing, scaling, and measuring the Agile framework within IT and across the enterprise. Stephanie leads the team of Agile Project Leaders in the roles of ScrumMaster, Kanban Lead, and/or Project Manager and also, oversees the IT Business Analysts and the IT Release Manager.Stephanie is... Read More →
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

Agile Coach, Sonatype
Since 1990, Mark Kilby has guided individuals, teams and organizations to develop unique software and system solutions for government, industry and academia. His roles have included software developer, technical lead, rocket scientist, principal investigator, technical architect, web development manager, methodologist, scrum master, product owner and agile coach (since 2003). His experience spans complete software development life cycles for a... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Potomac 4

10:45

Introduction to Agile with Distributed Teams: Working with Remote Team Members (Jutta Eckstein)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Agile development isn't any longer considered to work for collocated teams only. Also teams, projects and organizations that are distributed are asked to focus on delivering value. Yet, with Agile’s emphasis on -among other things- face-to-face communication this seems like a contradiction. So the question arises, how to adhere to the Agile principles when applying them in a distributed environment.
In this course attendees will learn about the key success factors for distributed teams. Participants will understand that also distributed teams can benefit from a value system and from principles that are beneficial for small teams. In fact the two trends - distribution in terms of globalization and Agility - can even complement each other.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how teams can be Agile in distributed environments
  • Understand the importance and limits of trust
  • Understand what kind of communication and collaboration ensure a team’s Agility in a distributed environment
  • Recognize the opportunities and challenges different cultures provide
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She holds a M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, a Dipl.Eng. in Product-Engineering, and a B.A. in Education. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying Agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'Agile... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

10:45

Conflict: To Know It Is To Love It (Doc List)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We all talk about conflict. We all experience it. But do we really understand what causes it and how we deal with it? Do we have any idea what to do about it? Much research and study has been done, but that doesn't help when you're in the middle of conflict. You don't have time to pull out the reference book or go to a website. You need simple, clear understanding.
Learn the categories of conflict and how to recognize them, which means having an understanding of what generates them. Learn the different strategies of dealing with conflict, recognize your own preferred strategies, and understand where you may choose to change your strategy. Discover specific tools you can use in any situation to comfortably and confidently deal with conflict. Doc List introduces some ideas to enhance your learning after you leave the session, so you can continue to expand your love affair with conflict.

Learning Outcomes:
  • List two or more tools/techniques for addressing and dealing with conflict in a team
  • Demonstrate one conflict mediation technique
  • Define "conflict"



Speakers
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

Senior Director, Training, Agile Velocity LLC
It's all about the people. Practices and methods and frameworks and... all of that is in service to enabling and supporting people in working effectively and working together.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac D

10:45

Eat Risks for Breakfast! (Mike Griffiths)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It has always been a good practice to engage team members in the estimation process; then agile methods taught us how teams should do the local planning and decision making too. So it should come as no surprise that the best people to undertake effective risk management are team members. They possess the best technical insight and are closer to any execution issues than team leads or project managers.
However, risk management as tackled by many organizations, is academic, boring, seemly removed from real-work and it often ignores the maximization of positive risks (opportunities). This workshop demonstrates how to turn teams into risk-consuming, opportunity-chasing beasts that have measurably different project outcomes!
At the Agile 2012 Conference I presented a session called “Collaborative Games for Agile Risk Management” that introduced fun, team based games to engage the team in risk and opportunity management. In the intervening years many teams have adopted these techniques and become much more effective at Risk Management. However it turns out I was focussing on the wrong end of the lever, the big news are the results teams are getting through Opportunity Management.
Teams using these approaches are not only driving out risks, but more surprisingly, building great inter-organization alliances, being given free passes on bureaucratic process and generally having an easier go of things. At first I was surprised at all the “good luck” these teams encountered but then I saw how small adjustments in team behaviour were being made towards freshly identified opportunities.
A little like the 18th Century discovery linking germs to infections that gave rise to the introduction of hand washing in hospitals increasing survival rate dramatically. Putting teams in charge of opportunity management leads to changes in day to day behaviour that dramatically increased the execution effectiveness and success rates of their projects.
Good leaders know the value of a powerful vision; it “Reveals a beckoning summit for others to chart their own course”. In other words once we know what our true goal is we can make our own micro adjustments. Getting teams to own opportunity exploitation makes them behave differently and benefits start occurring all over the project.
This session outlines the practices and reviews some case studies to so you can equip your team to be risk-consuming, opportunity-chasing beasts that leave a trail of business value and delighted stakeholders. Or, in the words of one team, they “Eat Risks for Breakfast and Poop Nuggets of Awesomeness All Day”.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • See why project managers are the least equipped to effectively identify and manage project risks.
  • • Learn engaging ways to educate team members about risk management including indentifying threats to avoid and opportunities to exploit
  • • Preview 5 collaborative games for effective threat and opportunity management from planning and identification, through management, to reporting and closure
  • • Understand the untapped potential of an increased emphasises on opportunity management
  • • Review case studies of projects teams that have been using these practices for three years and are achieving measurably better results than teams that do not
Attachments:

Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10/11

10:45

Agile and Beyond: How Far Can You Go in Embedded Software Development? (Andreas Dharmawan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
With the proliferation of IoT and consumer demand for smart homes, smarter appliances and automobiles, wearables, etc. – many traditional product-based manufacturing companies are now becoming embedded software companies.
This means that the design and manufacturing of physical products is becoming more and more complex- as it now requires the integration of both the physical components of the product, the firmware, and the myriad of software components these products contain.
Historically, embedded software developers have lagged behind IT in the adoption of Agile development practices, largely due to the requirement of developing for the target hardware.
Learning Outcomes:
  • In this session attendees will learn concrete tips and best practices used by some of the largest Embedded and IoT manufacturers to adopt and scale Agile methodologies to transform their business- all the way from product design, development, test and manufacturing.


Speakers
AD

Andreas Dharmawan

Senior Director, Solutions and Services, Electric Cloud
Andreas Dharmawan is the Senior Director, Solutions and Services at Electric Cloud. He leads technical pre-sales, post-sales, professional services, and training groups in the US, Japan, Korea, China and the UK. He develops packaged PS and training offerings that accelerate adoption, customer's ROI, and customer satisfaction. Dharmawan works with reseller partners in Japan, Korea, China, Germany to support overseas customers and expand sales in... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 8

10:45

Data Done Right: Applying Agile and XP Concepts To Enterprise Data Integration (Joseph Frazier, Randy Loushin)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Data projects often come with the perception that they are lengthy and expensive endeavors, which is an issue when speed-to-market is critical to business success. In an age where data is everything, how do you ensure projects are delivered both on-time and with the highest quality?
Come see how Nationwide Insurance has combined the best practices found in Agile, Lean, and Extreme Programming to deliver data integration projects faster, cheaper, and with higher quality. Topics to be covered include:
-- Learn how to achieve smaller, incremental delivery while navigating the waters of big business process. -- Give the customer exactly what they want by tearing down the walls between IT and Business. -- Follow the life of a story card as it enters the development life-cycle, using Cucumber and Rspec to test drive our application. -- Discover how blending the lines between development and testing results in increased productivity and team capability. -- Solve the headaches found during upgrades and regression testing through continuous integration. See all this and more as Nationwide Insurance shows you what we think is the correct way to deliver data!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Practical use of test driven development for data integration.
  • Approach to facilitating poly-skilling of resources between development and testing roles, to build a true software craftsman.
  • How to leverage continuous integration, with data to prevent defect injection in a complex environment.
  • Ability to adapt iterative development concepts to data.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Randy Loushin

Randy Loushin

Nationwide
Randy Loushin has 6+ years in the data integration and data warehousing space, and has been leading data integration projects using Agile and test driven development for the past three years. | | At Nationwide Insurance, a Fortune 100 company with an operating revenue of $25 billion, Randy has helped design and implement enterprise standards and framework around these agile/lean, scrum, XP concepts. | | Over the past couple years... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Three Things You MUST Know to Transform Any Sized Organization into an Agile Enterprise (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The deeper we go down the path of scaled agile transformation, the more we are learning that adding additional process and additional complexity can only ever get us part of the way there. At some point size and complexity is going to limit our ability to be truly agile. To be truly agile, we have to reduce size and complexity and move toward greater organizational simplicity.
The challenge is that large organizations ARE often complex and usually anything but simple. Most agile transformations get started by either ignoring the complexity inherent in the system or by wrapping that complexity in planning constructs that can help in the short run, but are ultimately doomed to limit your business agility over time. There has to be another way.
To really achieve agility at scale, we have to stop chasing more advanced ways to manage complexity and seek out more effective patterns for moving toward greater simplicity. In short, it’s not the end state of an agile transformation that we must stay focused on, it’s the systematic process of reducing complexity that is critical to achieving your ultimate business goals.
To transform any sized organization into an agile enterprise, there are only three things you need to know to be successful:
  1. You must have complete cross functional teams
  2. You must have clear backlogs
  3. You must have the ability to produce a working, tested increment of product on regular intervals.
Every other benefit of agile is impossible without creating these three conditions for success; everything that gets in the way of creating these three conditions is an impediment to your transformation which has to be removed; and your transformation roadmap should be solely focused on how your going to make all this possible in your organization. Until you make this happen... nothing much else is going to matter.
This talk will explore patterns for creating cross-functional teams at scale, what that looks like, what get’s in the way, and how to get there. We’ll discover why clear backlogs are so hard to create and what you'll need to do about it. Warning, this will not be easy! Finally, we’ll discuss why working tested software created on regular intervals is the secret sauce to actually getting the business benefits your organization is looking for.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn the critical importance of forming complete cross-functional teams, why many common patterns for forming teams fail, patterns for forming teams successfully, and strategies for progressively reducing dependencies between teams over time.
  • Participants will learn common failure patterns we see around creating backlogs, how the guidance contained in Scrum and SAFe can actually prevent some organizations from creating effective backlogs, and patterns for creating backlogs that really get teams moving quick.
  • Participants will learn what it really means to create a working, tested, increment at the end of every sprint, release, or PI. They will learn how making this kind of progress support solid delivery metrics, increases predictability, and earns the trust of the business over time



Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO, LeadingAgile
LeadingAgile co-founder and CEO, Mike Cottmeyer is passionate about solving the challenges associated with Agile in larger, more complex enterprises. To that end, he and his team are dedicated to providing large-scale Agile transformation services to help pragmatically, incrementally, and safely introduce Agile methods. He spends most of his time leading and growing LeadingAgile, doing sales and business development, developing content, and... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

10:45

Agile White House: How the TechFAR & Digital Services Playbook are Transforming Government (Aaron Pava)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The White House recently launched the United States Digital Service to deliver “customer-focused government through smarter IT.” As part of this announcement the Office of Management and Budget released the Digital Services Playbook and an accompanying TechFAR Handbook "for procuring digital services using Agile Processes,” making it easier for government agencies to buy and implement Agile.
In this session, participants will understand the history, intentions and key components of these documents, and have a deeper understanding on how to bringing Agile into government agencies.
Learning Outcomes:
  • A history of government Agile directives
  • Understanding the objectives behind the new TechFAR Handbook & Digital Services Playbook
  • Practical implementation techniques for procuring and implementing Agile within federal government agencies


Speakers
avatar for Aaron Pava

Aaron Pava

Co-Founder, CivicActions


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 13

10:45

A Systems Approach to Modern Leadership (Matt Barcomb)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As the pace of business and competition increase, leaders need to respond in kind; learning how to surf instead of trying to control the waves. The future of leadership lies in collaboratively cultivating ecosystems that allow emergence and growth to thrive. Modern leaders need to facilitate continuous change by seeing their organization as a system while simultaneously embracing uncertainty.
Attendees will leave this session with the ability to facilitate pragmatic practices they can use immediately to apply fundamental concepts about systems and uncertainty such as systems diagraming and experiment design.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of what makes environments uncertain
  • - Facilitating change in complex adaptive systems (CAS)
  • - Fundamental nature of developmental work
  • - Increase of connectedness in business
  • How to use experiment design
  • - Creating informed hypothesis in a CAS
  • - Decide on starting conditions and duration
  • Understanding context of experiments through systems
  • - Systems diagraming: boundary identification
  • - Systems diagraming: parts identification
  • - Systems diagraming: connections (using CDE model)
  • How to use narratives to sense organizational outcomes
  • - How to create broadening narratives
  • - How to focus your narrative on and end state
  • - How to discover leading narratives to sense changes



Speakers
avatar for Matt Barcomb

Matt Barcomb

VP Org Design Services, LeanDog
Matt (@mattbarcomb) is a product development specialist with a penchant for organization design. He works with companies to turn software development into a core competency by integrating product development activities with business practices. Matt takes a pragmatic, systems approach to improvement, working with stakeholders throughout medium and large organizations. He has experience working with product management and software delivery teams as... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 3

10:45

Blow the 'Self-Sealing Logic' Bubble (Oana Juncu)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We are drawn to people who share the same beliefs and have had similar relevant experiences. These groups give us strength and a sense of belonging. However, this creates a “self-sealing logic” that can lock out learning, because we state our beliefs as proven evidence. Every missed opportunity of collaboration, may it be at enterprise, organisation, or team level, is a symptom of our inability, as a group, to observe and learn from other group experience and set of values. We are here at the most important Agile Conference, seeking to meet people who have similar experiences, and eventually share same conclusions. What if we were about to create another bubble of "Self-Sealing-Logic" ?
The hands-on exercices used in the workshop use "Liminal Thinking", the latest fabulous work of Dave Gray, combined with examples of "Third Culture Kids" profiles. The approach aims to support organisations become continuous learning entities, that reinforce leadership and trigger cultural shift.
Session's main goals are :
  • create a space of opportunity to "unlock" our own bubble of beliefs through a set of hands-on exercices,
  • experience , through the open discussion during the exercices, how learning enhances leadership,
  • allow the audience to discover Dave Gray's "liminal thinking". We will learn to unveil the impact of our beliefs and start understanding why we have needed them. What were the relevant needs that lead to our assumptions? On the other hand, during the session, we will pick some other "self-sealing logic" group and try to understand without judgement their own process that led them from their own relevant experiences to different beliefs.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Awareness of our own beliefs as a members of a group
  • Experience Concrete tools to acquire this awareness
  • Have a new approach to create and foster openness of learning organisation
  • Enhance leadership via continuous learning
  • Have new ideas how to build sustainable change to Agile
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Oana Juncu

Oana Juncu

Founder, cOemerge
Oana\'s over 15 years of experience in Software Development and System Management led her choice to Agile, as the most effective approach for 21st century leading organizations focused on quality products creation that matter . She recently embraced the entrepreneurship path by founding cOemerge : www.coemerge.com , a company that helps its clients embrace Agility and build product that matters trhough Lean Startup.Oana acts as Agile... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 1/2/3

10:45

Lightning Talks: Process At Scale (Crowd Sourced Voting) (Lightning Talks)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The purpose of the Lightning Talks Track is to provide a lightweight, flexible opportunity for speakers to share valuable information with participants. Presentations style include 7 minute Pecha Kucha style presentation and slideless 3 minute Lightning Talk.
How to be a Lean Startup in an Enterprise ( Kelli Houston)
Customizing SAFe for YOU (Satish Thatte)
CONNECTING Rally, Jira, & TFS into ONE Agile Portfolio Rollup! (Rob Phillips)
The love affair between Complexity and Simplicity in development (Thomas Friend)
One Vision, One Product, Many Ways of Working (Jon Leslie)
Top Tips for Taking Agile from Dev into Production (Anders Wallgren)
Just-in-time Lightning Talks: If you want to give a just-in-time talk, you can sign up in Open Jam or 10 minutes prior to the start of a session.
Lightning Talk submissions can be seen here: http://agile-lightning.ideascale.com/
Learning Outcomes:


  • .




Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

10:45

Living the Trade-offs: Interactive Agile Roadmap Building (Todd Olson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Product management is essentially a set of trade-offs. This session will interactively break-down and prioritize Agile Roadmaps. The Roadmaps will be refined in iterative sessions. Each session will introduce a new concept that groups will then use to refine their Roadmap. Groups will then present their findings for feedback.
Concepts covered will include:
  • Business Value Prioritization
  • Using Metrics to Inform Decision Making
  • Cost of Delay
  • Usage Metrics
  • Lean Startup-like Experimentation
General Outline:
  • Presentation: Business Value Prioritization and Using Metrics to Inform Decision Making (15)
  • Exercise 1: How to prioritize a backlog based on business value prioritization and data usage decision-making (20 + 10 debrief)
  • Presentation: Measurement and Lean Startup-like Experimentation (15)
  • Exercise 2: How will you measure your top features’ impacts? (10)
  • Debrief + Q&A (5)

Learning Outcomes:
  • 3 takeaways include:
  • * How to prioritize a backlog based on business value prioritization.
  • * How weighted shortest job first (WSJF) can influence prioritization
  • * How to use data to inform product decision-making
  • * How to prioritize experiments and leverage the results to inform prioritization



Speakers
TO

Todd Olson

CEO, Pendo


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

10:45

Why Winning the Lottery is More Predictable than Your Agile Project (Daniel Vacanti, Bennet Vallet)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
“When will it be done?” That is the first question your customers ask you once you start work for them. And, for the most part, it is the only thing they are interested in until you deliver. Whether your process is predictable or not is judged by the accuracy of your answer. Think about how many times you have been asked that question and think how many times you have been wrong. Now think about how much harder it is to answer that question when practicing Agile at scale. Your customers most likely feel like they have better odds of winning the lottery than they do of your next Agile project coming in on time. That you don't know your odds of success is not necessarily your fault. You have been taught to collect the wrong metrics, implement the wrong policies, and make the wrong decisions. Until now. This session will introduce how to utilize the basic metrics of flow to more effectively manage the uncertainty associated with very large scale software development. In it, we will discuss how to leverage the power of advanced analytics like Cumulative Flow Diagrams, Cycle Time Scatterplots, and Monte Carlo Simulations to drive predictability at all levels of the organization. Your customers demand better predictability. Isn’t it time you delivered?

Learning Outcomes:
  • A meaningful understanding of the basic metrics of flow (WIP, Cycle Time, Throughput)
  • How to apply flow metrics at all levels of the organization
  • How to visualize flow metrics in advanced analytics like Cumulative Flow Diagrams and Scatterplot
  • How to interpret those analytics as guides for process intervention for predictability



Speakers
DV

Daniel Vacanti

CEO, Corporate Kanban
BV

Bennet Vallet

Principal Consultant, ActionableAgile.com


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 6/7

10:45

Stalwarts: Ahmed Sidky (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. (also know as Dr. Agile because of his doctorate in Agile) is the Director of Development Management at Riot Games where he leads a team of 60 internal agile coaches. Ahmed also serves as President of the International Consortium for Agile (ICAgile.com) – a methodology-agnostic accreditation and certification body helping deepen people’s agile competencies. Throughout his career, Ahmed has led a number of Fortune 100 companies through large-scale agile transformations using his culture-led transformation approach, which focuses on changing and introducing organizational habits critical to sustaining agility. He is the co-author of “Becoming Agile in an Imperfect World”, and is a seasoned speaker who has made several keynote appearances worldwide.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.











Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky

Director of Development Management, Riot Games
Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. known as Doctor Agile, is a well-known thought-leader in the Agile community. He is currently the Director of Development Management for Riot Games and before that he was a transformation consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the co-author of Becoming Agile in an Imperfect World, and the President and co-founder of the International Consortium for Agile (ICAgile). Ahmed was selected to be the program chair for the Agile... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 2

10:45

Explore with Intent - Exploratory Testing Self-Management (Maaret Pyhajarvi)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As an active learner, you will get better every day you spend on testing. Exploratory testing treats test design, test execution and learning as parallel, mutually supportive activities, to find things we don’t know we don’t know. Doing things in parallel can be difficult, and testing needs to adjust to the tester’s personal skill level and style. Your skill to self-manage your work and your learning - making learning and reflection a habit - is what differentiates skilled exploratory testing from randomly putting testing activities together.
This session teaches you how to explore with intent that fits your personal style and skill, and how to be courteous towards your team members with your information needs. For self-management skills of exploratory testing, we use a notebook thinking tool that focuses on four types of ideas in parallel to keep track of our exploration: Mission (sandboxing my services), Next charter (goal for a timebox), Details (notes I can act on now or postpone a little) and Other charters (identifying more work).
In addition to sharing stories and notes I’ve created on a notebook while I test, we will practice together the most difficult thing to do in parallel: focus on detail and the big picture of testing.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn to test with intent that fits your personal style and skill with simple self-management tool
  • Learn how 2 hours of testing can be completely different in contents and how you control the contents
  • Learn to keep track of what you are about to do when the plan is supposed to change as you learn, to know if you are done
  • Learn to handle interruptions to your testing to improve its flow: report/ask now or later and to collect ideas of what to test later while you are testing
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Maaret Puhajarvi

Maaret Puhajarvi

Testing Specialist, Granlund Oy
Software specialist with soft spots for hands-on testing, helping teams grow and building successful products and businesses. Agile, Lean, Lean startup are mindsets I work with. I work towards happiness and wellbeing of people who create software - not just programmers.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 12

10:45

The UX Connection: Driving Innovation on an Agile Project (Hugh Beyer)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
This session focuses innovation in Agile: how to develop and maintain a long-term vision while still driving an Agile team sprint by sprint. It’s hard for a UX team to do both—the pace of Agile sprints pull the team into the day to day work of individual stories. But if the UX team focuses only on stories they cannot develop the holistic view of the customer that leads to out-of-the-box solutions.
This session shows how you can do both. We lay out the work of the UX team, from user research through vision and architecture to UI design and implementation. We show how the UX team can use Scrum to organize its work in parallel with development so that the focus on vision and innovation is not lost. We show how to use Lean UX principles to work with development on that part of the UX job.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn a model for integrating UX work with Agile development that accommodates all the non-coding aspects of UX and dovetails them with development sprints. They’ll have experienced the model a little in the session and have a sense of how it might play out in their own environment.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hugh Beyer

Hugh Beyer

UX Architect, Cohealo
Hugh is a UX designer and thought leader with extensive experience in a wide variety of industries and product types. He has a strong track record creating innovative designs through user research, needs analysis, ideation and iteration, and of guiding teams through these activities.Hugh is also an innovator in the area of Agile Development, working with agile teams since 2004. He wrote one of the first papers on integrating UX techniques with... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 5/6

10:45

Our business pipeline is broken (Salah Elleithy, George Dinwiddie)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Your delivery team may be focused on continuously tuning their CI/CD pipeline but who is focusing on the business pipeline?
If your delivery team is not always producing new functionality at the rate you want, the bottleneck might not be in the way they’re working. Imagine a software development factory that can’t get the raw materials it needs in time to keep production humming.
The Theory of Constraints (ToC) adopts the idiom of “a chain is no stronger than its weakest link”. Delivery teams need the right requirements (chunks of work) at the right time.
“What?” you say. “I’m already working as hard as I can to provide them with complete requirements specifications.” I believe you. Salah and George can help you notice some issues that might have escaped your attention. And they can help you address those issues in ways that may save you some work.
Questions that may be helpful to consider are:
  • What makes it so challenging to provide the information the delivery team needs at the time they need it?
  • What causes our business pipeline to be broken? In manufacturing, identifying bottlenecks may be obvious but what about knowledge work?!
  • What’s hidden that could cause delays and create a state of learned helplessness?
This presentation will explore the challenges that stems from the discovery and explore ideas to consider for building a healthy business pipeline. At the end of this session, you will be able to identify the bottlenecks using the drum buffer rope and learn about the 3 amigos and clarification through examples (acceptance scenarios) and techniques to alleviate the bottlenecks.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Define what the business pipeline is
  • Introduce the drum buffer rope (DBR) that’s derived from the theory of constraints (TOC) as a possible solution
  • Identify the challenges with the business pipeline
  • Ideas on how to fix the business pipeline.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Software Development Coach, iDIA Computing
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community... Read More →
avatar for Salah Elleithy

Salah Elleithy

Agile Coach, SparkAgility
Salah gets the most joy out of sparking curiosity in learning and experimentation. Throughout his journey, he has held roles in business analysis, project management, product management, agile coaching and management consulting. Salah is passionate about enabling organizational agility and enhancing team capabilities. His work entails helping organizations in designing a community (culture) of learning. Salah is the Founder and Learning... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 4/5

11:30

Talk Ain't Easy - Round-the-World Agile Without *ANY* Talk (Gerard Meszaros)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Face to Face Communication is one of the core values of Agile yet here we are building an SaaS product with a 5 person team in 5 time zones spread around the world using agile and we never talk to each other! Come see how we rescued a a small 5-year-old SaaS product that was suffering from an existential crisis by adopting agile practices and innovative communication techniques using free or low-cost SaaS tools .
The original developer had built a complex system that met the business needs but after 4+ years had lost interest in the product. As a result the flow of new functionality had slowed to a dribble and the business people in Australia and New Zealand were very frustrated! The technical architecture was quite complex as it used many frameworks but had no documentation and very few (and very complex) unit tests. There were half a dozen servers doing various things and the build and deployment processes were all manual. As a result, we were in severe danger of being unable to support the product. We had to find someone to take over support and enhancement of the application and we had a lot to learn. Being a very small company with everyone only involved a few hours per day, we couldn't afford the cost or risk of hiring a full time developer. We've had some ups and downs with outsourcing the development work to people in India and Romania but we have now restored the regular flow of value to our customers. This required evolving a highly distributed agile process with each person located on a different sub-continent. We embraced key agile practices including User Stories, ATDD, CI, Unit Testing, Database Refactoring and Automated Deployment (not quite CD, yet!) We build on cloud-based SaaS technologies whenever possible to maximize value and minimize build cost. And we learned how to work as a cloud-based team with good collaboration and communication using cloud-based tools without ever talking face-to-face.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * Adopting Agile doesn't have to be expensive.
  • * Distributed development challenges can be overcome using low-cost (or even free!) SaaS tools.
  • * There is an amazing variety of SaaS tools available to choose from (Good news: don't have to build; Bad news: Have to choose from many options)
  • * Avoid analysis paralysis; Just pick something "good enough" and start running with it
  • * Voice communcation is highly overrated - Poor communications links and accents can make it useless
  • * "Good-enough" communication is better than no communication; good chat tools are key;
  • * Supplement with Multimedia (quick screen shots, mock-ups, interactive prototypes, etc)
  • * People will adjust behaviour to optimize the situation; many of us make ourselves available in non-core hours to answer developer questions quickly
  • * Start with small improvement features that affect small parts of the code; learn as you go
  • * Plan on things to take longer than you expected and don't despair when they take even longer; everyone is learning lots and will get faster over time
  • * Be prepared to get the wrong people off the bus! (Our first attempt at outsourcing was a dismal failure; we had to rewrite all the developers code; we should have fired him a lot sooner.)
  • * Focus on quality, productivity will come later.
Attachments:

Speakers
GM

Gerard Meszaros

Solution Frameworks Inc.
Gerard Meszaros is an independent software development consultant and trainer with 30+ years experience in software and over a decade of experience in agile methods. He is an expert in test automation patterns, refactoring of software and tests, and design for testability and has applied automated unit and acceptance testing on projects ranging from full-on eXtreme Programming to traditional waterfall development in wide range of industries. He... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 11:30 - 12:00
Potomac 4

14:00

The Agile Architect: Our Experience in Discovering A Successful Pattern (Chris Edwards, Sean Dunn)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The role of "Architect" is sometimes frowned upon in the Agile community as a central command-and-control authority who bottlenecks decisions and limits team empowerment. Or at least, that is what we thought. Follow the real-life journey of our teams as we discovered how the role of an architect is compatible with Agile principles. We will explore our failures, and eventual discovery on how the role brings can bring an immense amount of value to the organization and the teams, especially on large, multi-team projects.
This talk relates our experiences in integrating an architect role with several teams at IHS Inc. Faced with the challenge of scaling several teams working on the same product, we quickly discovered the need to exchange technical information between the teams. How were we to maintain an appropriate level of technical consistency while remaining true to Agile principles? We explicitly wanted to avoid an authoritative architect role, but struggled to find an alternate model. After initial failures, we eventually learned the important relationship between leadership and architecture. Ultimately, we discovered a successful pattern for an architect role that preserves emergent design and team empowerment while maintaining minimally sufficient technical consistency.
Our organization is comprised of approximately 40 people on 6-7 teams developing 3 separate products. Between 3-5 teams are working simultaneously on the Harmony Enterprise project. The challenges of this project are the focus of the presentation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Our initial approach of the architect was to be a “scout” that did investigations and provided a stream of information to the teams. We encountered several issues with this approach:
  • - Communication would breakdown. Info would be misunderstood or missed. This often became the "architect's fault" for not communicating enough information.
  • - Different teams had different design values, and thus there was friction between the teams who had different expectations of the designs coming out of other teams. We could not yet engage in meaningful, objective design discussions. Again, this became perceived by the teams as "the architect's fault".
  • - We learned quickly that we were "wrong" about our architectural approach. This was an agile victory because we discovered it early, but it was not well received by the teams who perceived someone else's mistake as causing them more work.
  • We value consitency in several areas (Coding standard, design values, architectural approach), but we failed to engage the teams in decision making process. Through one-on-one conversations with Scrum Masters, we developed a "Design scrum-of-scrums", in which the Architect facilitated a daily 30-minute meeting with representatives from each team ("Design Quarterbacks"). His goal is not necessarily to provide answers, but to guide the conversations so the teams are considering all the right things and reaching a decision that they can buy-into. Previously the Architect would be responsible for doing research and prototyping, but now acts as the role of Coach while the teams take on this responsibility.
  • Our experience with this approach as proved very positive.
  • - Relationships between teams has improved which has results in much more communication.
  • - Problems with designs are discovered much quicker, because the teams have more information
  • - A common mental model (“Conceptual Integrity”) exists across teams, which results in reduced rework.
Attachments:

Speakers
SD

Sean Dunn

Agile Coach, IHS Inc.
Sean has been passionate about Agile methodologies since 2008. He is experienced in the energy and defense industries and has successfully applied Agile methodologies in a variety of settings. With over 13 years of military experience, Sean is very interested in the relationships between Agile, leadership and mission command philosophies. Sean is a Professional Engineer, a Certified Scrum Professional, and a PMI Agile Certified Professional.
avatar for Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards

Principal Software Engineer, IHS Inc.
Chris Edwards, P.Eng. Chris is a software manager with IHS Inc. IHS is a global company with over 8000 employees that provides information and analytics to multiple industries,including energy, automotive, electronics, aerospace and chemicals. Chris has had a variety of roles including developer, manager, Scrum Master and architect. He has a passion for how both technical excellence and transformational leadership can help drive agility.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Potomac 4

14:00

Introduction to Agile Requirements: User Stories, Backlogs, & Beyond (Ellen Gottesdiener)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
One of the most challenging and trouble-prone aspects of product development is discovering the right product requirements to deliver at the right time—and for the right customer. User stories and product backlogs are useful tools, but they aren't the only elements you'll need.
Join Ellen in this fast-paced introductory session to learn a common-sense approach to agile requirements that will help you reduce risk and deliver value. Survey powerful ways to have colorful and collaborative requirements conversations. Discover how acceptance tests, prototypes, and models articulate important details. Understand the characteristics of a healthy backlog and review the methods that agile teams use when mining the backlog for business value.
This session debunks commonly held agile requirements myths and misconceptions. These include: “user stories are requirements”; “agile teams don’t do planning”; “requirements documentation goes away in agile”; and “agile teams don’t do analysis”. Come and see how a holistic approach to agile requirements can take you beyond user stories to a place where stakeholders can converse, collaborate, and co-create a shared understanding of ever-evolving product needs.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how agile requirements can reduce risk and deliver value, faster
  • Learn common myths and misconceptions of agile requirements
  • Recognize the utility—and limitations of user stories
  • Outline ways agile teams supplement user stories
  • Understand characteristics of a healthy backlog
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

CEO/Founder, EBG Consulting
Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the convergence of agile + requirements + product management and a pioneer in the use of collaborative practices for product discovery. She offers techniques, tools, training, and leadership in how you can engage in ways that excite, invite, and produce valuable product outcomes and happy teams. | | Ellen is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and presenter. Her most recent book... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

14:00

Rewire Your Brain: Practices to Use Brain Plasticity to Become a Better Coach (Sarah Baca)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As agile coaches, we use strategies to empower our teams. But how can we teach our teams to be brave and innovative when we ourselves have brains that are wired to be fearful and judgmental? That is the opposite of bravery and innovation!
During this workshop we will learn and practice how we can consciously rewire our brains to become the coaches our teams need. How can we alter our thoughts to keep us calm when catastrophe strikes? How can we learn to accept reality and practice empathy?
Using research from the works of Dr. Rebecca Bailey, an expert in developmental psychology, and Dr. Brené Brown, a research professor, Sarah will take attendees on a journey through basic brain structure and brain plasticity. Attendees will learn how to rewire their brains and will practice exercises that they can continue at home to truly change the way their brains think. These skills take years to master, but learning to consciously change the way we think will be a great start on this journey.
Sarah has been practicing and coaching these skills with parents, children, scrum teams, and scrum masters for over ten years. She is passionate about the improvements that we can bring into our lives, teams, and companies when we make the time to consciously wire our brains for success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Familiarity with Dr. Bailey's Brain State Model
  • Exercises to form the neural pathways to maintain composure during times of stress
  • Exercises to help attendees move from the "fight or flight" part of the brain into the problem-solving part of the brain
  • Exercises to develop and practice empathy
  • Tools to begin transforming team culture by using intrinsic motivation



Speakers
avatar for Sarah Baca

Sarah Baca

Agile Coach and ScrumMaster, Pentaho
I'm an Agile Coach, mom of three and step mom of three. I am passionate about communication and authenticity. I strive to show how engaged workers who love their jobs make companies more profitable and help us make better products . I co-lead Agile Orlando and am speaking at Agile 2015 about using Brain Plasticity to build better teams.



Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

14:00

Retrospectives: Moving From A Subjective To An Objective World (Prateek Singh)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Traditionally Agile teams run retrospectives to facilitate learning, development, collaboration and improvement of the team. Teams have tried multiple different formats to get the right outcomes. Issues of all sorts seem to pop up many times - lack of participation, finger pointing, irrelevant topics, lack of prioritization of issues. Are these or similar problems hindering the effectiveness of your retrospectives? What format of retrospective can best promote the culture of collective vision and collaboration in your team? How can we get the best outcomes fro the team by having the most collaborative retrospectives? Recently numerous teams have moved to objective retrospectives from a completely subjective form of retrospective as a solution. Objective retrospectives use the team’s data to conduct the retrospective, to create talking points and to see the effects of action items taken by the team since the last retrospective. We will go over examples of patterns seen in metrics and graphs to assist with identification of talking points and examples of resultant action items. We will also do a deeper dive into facilitation of techniques for facilitating both subjective and objective retrospectives. We will also talk through figuring out the best format to choose for
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees are expected to learn which retrospective techniques work best for teams of different maturity levels. They will be able to pick up subtleties of different types of subjective retrospectives. They will be guided towards the best formats of retrospectives for the particular nuances of their team. They will gain a generic knowledge of how to look at scatterplots and Cumulative Flow Diagrams and deduce information from these. Examples of patterns to look for and the lessons that have been learned by other teams when they have looked at these patterns will also be presented as a starting guide to Objective retrospectives. This would help attendees both conduct and participate effectively in whichever style of retrospective the team chooses. The target audience is the leaders of teams that are looking for effective retrospective styles, with participants of these retrospectives being a secondary audience.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Prateek Singh

Prateek Singh

Manager of Software Engineering, Ultimate Software
Prateek has been leading and working on agile teams for the past 10 years. Starting with XP, then Scrum and now working in a Kanban system, Prateek has gained a breadth and depth of knowledge regarding agile techniques, practices and implementation principles. Prateek is currently involved in conducting training and coaching for teams regarding Kanban and Lean principles at Ultimate Software. Prateek has played the role of Software Engineer... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

14:00

A Gentle Introduction to Reactive Extensions (Hadi Hariri)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Reactive Extensions have been around for quite a while. First originated in the Microsoft space, they are now available pretty much on any language and platform, including Java and JavaScript. In this session we’re going to understand what reactive extensions are all about and how we can leverage them to create asynchronous and scalable applications. We’ll see the benefits they provide over other more traditional asynchronous models and see how to put them to use with practical examples. This session is about finally understanding Rx and removing all the myth surrounding it.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the basics of reactive programming and what benefits these provide, as well as where to use it.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hadi Hariri

Hadi Hariri

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer and creator of many things OSS, his passions includes Web Development and Software Architecture. Has authored a couple of books, a few courses and has been speaking at industry events for nearly 15 years. Currently at JetBrains leading the Developer Advocacy team. Spends as much time as he can writing code.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 8

14:00

Technical Excellence Doesn't Just Happen--Igniting a Craftsmanship Culture (Allison Pollard, Mike Rieser)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The ninth principle from the Agile Manifesto states that technical excellence enhances agility, but when the codebase is ugly and the deadlines are tight, most teams don’t choose to refactor mercilessly, adopt TDD, or evaluate automated testing tools—unless they have the proper support. In our experience working with multiple teams in a single codebase, developers can feel victim to a legacy codebase if only a few people are writing clean code or refactoring; guiding them on how to decrease technical debt while delivering their projects helps "unstuck" their other agile practices. We will talk about the challenges we’ve seen with Product Owners, Managers, and Scrum Masters interacting with teams at various stages of agile+technical excellence and how a focus on technical practices sparked a wider interest in craftsmanship. Learn how can you influence the team towards the right practices while fostering their sense of ownership. Getting serious about technical excellence requires support from technical and non-technical roles, and we’ll share how we partnered as coaches to help an organization through a technical turnaround with some tips for others who need to do the same.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Why technical excellence is important and the impact of having only a small percentage of developers applying good technical practices
  • How to influence the team towards the right practices while fostering their sense of ownership
  • What craftsmanship means to other roles (e.g., QA, Scrum Master, Product Owner, manager)
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Allison Pollard

Allison Pollard

Agile Coach, Improving
I am an agile coach working with 20 teams in a large enterprise, and I love to create communities for those interested in developing their agile instincts; I mentor project managers to become great Scrum Masters and coach managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results and an organizational community that provides sustainability for agile. I am also one of the organizers of the Dallas-Fort Worth Scrum user group which hosts monthly sessions... Read More →
avatar for Mike Rieser

Mike Rieser

Practice Director, Agile and Software Development, Fenway Group



Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 7/8/9

14:00

Incident Response Patterns: What we have learned at PagerDuty (Arup Chakrabarti)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
At PagerDuty, we see how engineers across the industry are resolving incidents. Some teams take days to resolve problems, some take minutes, and most are somewhere in between.
In this talk, we will cover some learnings that we have had internally at PagerDuty from our own incidents, steps we have taken to get better at them, and how we run post-mortems. From there, we will also cover some trends across the industry: how long outages take, how many people have to get involved, how many teams actually fix their root causes, and how much sleep the average on-call engineer gets.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Best practices on incident response



Speakers
avatar for Arup Chakrabarti

Arup Chakrabarti

Engineering Manager - Operations Engineering, PagerDuty
Arup has been working in the space of software operations since 2007. He started out at as an Operations Engineer at Amazon, helping to reduce customer defects with multiple teams for the Amazon Marketplace. Since then, he has managed and built operations teams at Amazon and Netflix to help improve availability and reliability. He currently works at PagerDuty, where he is part of the Operations Engineering Team.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 5/6

14:00

The Secret of Our DevOps Success: Fostering Human Behavioral Change (Mark Nemecek)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
DevOps is all about continuous change and improvement. The only constant in a healthy DevOps culture is change. Conway’s Law teaches us that our systems will only change as our human communication methods change. That’s behavior. Ergo, if you cannot facilitate and provide for human behavior change, your DevOps culture will suffer as a result.
Problem: humans don’t like change. This is not a cynical statement. Humans evolved to be creatures of habit. Habit is safe. Routine is safe. The known is safe and the unknown is not. This one thing – the instinctive human desire to resist and rebel against change – is the single biggest blocker to a DevOps cultural transformation.
Our observations are that organizational rank is less relevant in this space. We can command that employees work, but we cannot arbitrarily command behavioral change. Introducing behavioral change via command without also aligning cultural perception tends to result in many points of subconscious rebellion that can ultimately defeat the original initiative without ever manifesting tangibly.
We have seen success here by selling ideas instead of instilling them forcibly. We have our partners, our teams and our change agents all arrive at a common truth via an interview and discovery approach instead of a command approach. In doing so, we align the culture on the idea and can then rely on cultural safeguards to see it through.
This is a powerful concept, but the path is fraught with pitfalls for the change agent, both external and internal. We’ve seen success and failure in this space, and the success/failure patterns may not be immediately obvious to newcomers. The ability to remove value judgments from change initiatives and willingness to prioritize the change atmosphere over one’s own ideas for change are among the critical characteristics we have seen in successful change agents. We will analyze these characteristics and others and discuss how to best stay on track for long-term transformational success even when short-term initiatives see rejection.
Attendees will come away feeling better empowered to attack the change needs in their respective organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Acknowledge that an organization’s ability to transform is directly dependent on the ability of its human resources to change behavior.
  • Acknowledge that telling people to work is very different from telling them to change; understand that change agency is difficult by nature, not because of any particular environment.
  • Learn that transformation that is worthwhile and successful is always born from a strong answer to the WHY argument, not the HOW argument. The HOW is transitive, but the WHY is your true north.
  • Learn to not attach personal value judgments to proposed changes; stop assigning “right” or “wrong” to initiatives when acting as a change agent, and thereby remove emotional attachment from the initiative; instead, one must make a judgment call on which change will provide the best cultural return on investment while keeping one’s eye on the long game.
  • Learn how to shift one’s approach to more successfully drive positive change in the face of resistance and adversity.
Attachments:

Speakers
MN

Mark Nemecek

Sr. Director, IT Infrastructure, CDK Global
20 year veteran of software development, including 12 years at Microsoft. Most recent 2 years spent in a DevOps-centric role in the hosting management org of CDK Global's IT division.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 12

14:00

Reinventing Organizations - Enterprise Agility (Olaf Lewitz, Michael Sahota)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We present an alternative view to fitting Agile into larger organizations. Inspired by Fred Laloux’ book “Reinventing Organizations”, we offer a coherent and comprehensive model for organizational development which encompasses the past and guides us into the future. Agile finds its place in these concepts, and becomes a means to move between the model’s stages.
As a leader in an organization on its agile journey, you’ll notice that increasing agility struggles with existing organizational structures, governance systems and management expectations. We’ve understood for a while that the prevalent ways of how we run organizations are not compatible with Agile. We’ve tried to package Agile in a way that makes sense to people in organizations working the classical way.
Learn what’s new and essential about this model: the idea of organizational models developing with the evolution of human consciousness, progressing in clear stages. Now being a time where a new organizational model is emerging, and what that looks like. Learn how self-management, wholeness and evolutionary purpose shape organizations where agile will flourish and which agile can help bring about. Take away clear options for your enterprise and your clients to try.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will understand how levels of organizational development influence fitness of an organization to be agile: how well Agile can work within organizations operating from these levels and how we can use Agile to transform our organization.
  • You will have learned example practices of advanced organizations and heard stories of companies where these practices have been successful.
  • You will learn something in this session that you can put to use next Monday: You will be able to identify steps and influence your organization.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 3

14:00

Whole-Team Dynamic Organizational Modeling (Raj Mudhar, Catherine Louis)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
In large organizations where the size of the product exceeds what a single Scrum team can deliver, we think through the best way to organize teams and work. In this hands-on workshop, we navigate through the process of developing & assessing large organizations using Lego. Unlike traditional paper-based “box and line” org charts, these models are physical, are built collaboratively, and provide insights into the psychology of the organization and its people. At Agile2012, this session was standing-room-only! Read about it on InfoQ here: http://tiny.cc/bs1duw Since then we’ve expanded and refined the approach.
The design of a large scale Agile organization is not a trivial undertaking. Business decisions are full of trade-offs, constraints, and opportunities. Organizational design has similar concerns. The effectiveness of your Scrum (or other agile) teams depends on optimum team organization balanced against the constraints of the business and your customers. Trade-off decisions can make the difference between an effective organization and one that continually struggles to deliver value to customers. In addition to the usual business considerations, there are cultural factors that come into play. The individualistic and Cartesian thinking that is a large part of organizational culture in countries like France may create problems when working with a collectivist, Confucianist value system that is a large part of cultures in countries like China.
Over the past eight years, Catherine and Raj have worked with project teams of 100 to 9000 people, distributed across many global locations, to model and test organizational design. There are many real-world constraints to consider, including:
  • Proximity to customers
  • Team communication barriers
  • Export control and other compliance legislation
  • Third-party supplier collaboration
  • Regional labour laws
  • Product architecture
  • Skills distribution
  • Cross-border cultures (e.g. French, American, Chinese, Indian cultural considerations for example)
By involving teams and other business stakeholders in the modeling process, the organization develops a deeper understanding of the constraints and opportunities of each proposed organizational design option, and more importantly, the modeling tool and method uncovers hidden assumptions and the values and principles that drive day to day organizational routines. This deeper level of understanding helps teams put their biases on the table for evaluation, often leading to new insights and ultimately, a better organizational model.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Building organizational preto-types - a physical model of your project organization you can use for troubleshooting, among other things, communication pitfalls, logistics issues related to infrastructure like test environments, and any number of other organizational constraints.
  • Methods for adapting the most challenging “old school organizations” to help them move along the continuum from traditional to Agile.
  • Thinking tools to help teams and management make good choices about organizational design. You’ll consider organizational communication, learning, speed of development, and quality.
  • Psychological factors that emerge during design, and how to deal with them.
  • Exposing and dealing with constraints including:
  • Degrees of separation from the Customer in geographic terms, and in terms of how far development teams are removed from direct customer contact.
  • Number and distribution of engineering staff (hardware, software, architects, testers, programmers, support and operations)
  • Number and distribution of non-technical staff (marketing, finance, product managers or product owners, sales)
  • The market conditions and the overriding goal. It could be quality, time to market, increasing organizational learning, a competitive threat, or a combination.
  • How management is organized to support the organization.
  • Constraints, including but not limited to, budget, skills shortage, communication barriers, regulated environments, standards compliance, unions.



Speakers
CL

Catherine Louis

cll group
Looking forward to producing the most awesome stage, "Working With Customers" thanks to our great review team and Shane Hastie!
RM

Raj Mudhar

Deloitte Canada


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

14:00

A Quantum Physicist and an Agile Executive Walk into a Bar (Jean Tabaka)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Woe to you agile executive in this 21st century world of disruption, chaos, non-local causes, unknown unknowns. You are expected to tend to your teams as they go through the agile adoption you’ve asked for. But who is watching over you and the toll this adoption takes on you? How do you make sense of all the pressures, caught between an existing bureaucracy and the demand for innovation. It is enough to drive one to drink. But if you happen to be walking into the bar with a quantum physicist, you are in for some surprising solace. More importantly, our physicist can warm you with amazing advice about the way of the world and what you can do about it. At last, some empathy. In this talk, Jean Tabaka takes us on the journey of the woeful agile executive struggling to succeed in a business structure that still embraces a Newtonian view of the world. Through empathy, a belief in the power of disorder, and the conviction that we all deserve joy in our work, we’ll explore what life is currently like for these executives; what we’d want it to be; and, how to get us there via 12 valuable practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Understand the power of the sense of our work (it sucks or it's great)
  • • Embrace chaos and disorder effectively in managing disruption and creativity based on quantum physics principles
  • • Create empathic contracts with those you report into and with those who report into you
  • • Amplify your successes beyond process and into the implicit and explicit social contracts
  • • Determine your next right thing to do of the 12 success patterns of agile executives



Speakers
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you work with amazing people who want to do the right thing, why wouldn't you want to give it your best? My good ol' conviction in the power of facilitation and... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac D

14:00

Is Agile Project Management an Oxymoron? (Michael Nir)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The concept of Agile Project Management is somewhat controversial and some people might say that the concept of project management is inconsistent with Agile; however:
• If we look closely at a typical Agile team-level project, there is actually a lot of “project management” going on; it’s just a different kind of project management and the project management functions are distributed among different roles on an Agile team rather than being performed by a single individual called a “Project Manager”
• As we scale Agile beyond simple single-team projects to larger and more complex enterprise-level projects, there is definitely a need to integrate some level of project and program management with an Agile development approach
• There are many stereotypes and misconceptions about both “Agile and Waterfall” that make those two approaches seem like binary and mutually-exclusive choices that are polar opposites and are totally incompatible with each other
The objective of this presentation is to separate some of these stereotypes and misconceptions from reality and begin to see Agile and traditional plan-driven project management principles and practices as complementary to each other rather than competitive and examine how these two approaches can be blended together in real-world situations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand stereotypes and misconceptions that exist about traditional project management and Agile in order to develop an objective view of what Agile Project Management is
  • Learn to see Agile and traditional project management principles and practices as complementary rather than competitive and learn how to blend Agile and traditional project management principles and practices together in the right proportions to fit a given project situation
  • Learn the general differences in an Agile Project Management role and the shifts in thinking that project managers might need to make to operate successfully in an Agile environment
  • Discuss specific roles for Agile Project Managers in an Agile environment and the skills that will be needed to play those roles
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Michael Nir

Michael Nir

President, Sapir Consulting
Michael Nir - President of Sapir Consulting US LLC - PMP, Scaled Agile Consultant - has been helping clients overcome business challenges and achieve their potential for over 16 years. He is passionate about Gestalt theory and practice, which complements his civil and industrial engineering background (M.Sc. and B.Sc.) and contributes to his understanding of individual and team dynamics in business. Michael has authored best-sellers on... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

Rebranding as a Product Delivery Office: Transforming Uncertainty into Knowledge (Pat Reed, Walt Wyckoff)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As organizations realize the benefits of agile development and start to transform into agile enterprises, traditional PMO's often struggle to understand their new value proposition and shed traditional governance frameworks and mindsets. This workshop will walk through a Discovery exercise to explore how the Agile PMO delivers value and a rebranding exercise into transforming the traditional PMO framework and practices into a high performing Product Delivery Office (PDO) or even a Value Management Office (VMO). Workshop outcomes will include a deeper understanding of how to transform your PMO into a catalyst for learning and enabling your enterprise transformation.
This workshop will be highly interactive with the following agenda:
1. 15 minute presentation on how Agile PMO's create value (with an emphasis on cultivating an organizational growth mindset and understanding what changes and why)
2. 10 minute table exercise of crafting a new value proposition for your agile PMO using Value Proposition Design combined with an Appreciative Inquiry approach
3. 20 minute table exercise of crafting a new vision, value model and change canvas for transforming your PMO into a PDO or VMO
4. 20 minutes for table presentations and idea sharing where participants from each table will share their top ideas and challenges while facilitators affinity map and mind map
5. 10 minute synthesis of ideas about how participates might take action to apply on the job; Q&A and wrap

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Recognizing challenges and recognizing pitfalls of applying traditional PMO practices in an Agile transformation
  • 2. Emergent thinking and cutting edge techniques for taking the organization to the next level
  • 3. How to create a culture of value and a clear line of sight to teams and individuals
  • 4. Understand that the role of an Agile PMO is to transform uncertainty into knowledge and value through setting the foundation for a learning organization



Speakers
avatar for Pat Reed

Pat Reed

Consultant, iHoriz
Experienced enterprise agile coach and consultant adjunct professor at UC Berkeley Agile Management Program Director on the Agile Alliance Community Leader and co-founder of PMI's Agile Community of Practice experienced Agile Executive for more than 25 years at The Walt Disney Company, Walt Disney Pictures and Television, NBC and Universal Studios, GE and Gap, Inc. 35 years teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac C

14:00

Stalwarts: Dean Leffingwell (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Dean Leffingwell

Widely recognized as a leading authority on software development, Dean Leffingwell is an author, serial entrepreneur, and software development methodologist. He is the creator of the Scaled Agile Framework, and author of five books on software development. His most recent books Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, and Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises, form much of the basis of modern thinking on Lean-Agile software development principles and practices. Founder of several successful startups, including Requisite, Inc., makers of RequisitePro (acquired by Rational), Mr. Leffingwell also served as Chief Methodologist to Rally Software, and prior to that, as a Sr. Vice President at Rational Software (now part of IBM). He currently serves as Chief Methodologist and CEO at Scaled Agile, Inc., which he co-founded in 2011.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.











Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

President, Leffingwell, LLC.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 2

14:00

Prototyping: Iterating Your Way to Glory (Melissa Perri, Josh Wexler)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Feel like your new product ideas are a bit stagnant? Most organizations start off strong in product development, but stop being innovative along the way. This happens when we focus too much on building instead of learning and iterating. In this workshop, you will learn how to overcome the psychological barriers to iteration by introducing a culture of learning into your organization using prototypes. Prototypes are a powerful tool for innovation, yet they are often misunderstood. You will learn about various prototypes, where best to use them, and the different types of fidelity. Through a hands on workshop we’ll get you out testing your ideas!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand a culture of learning and why it is important.
  • Learn about the psychological barriers to iteration and what you can do to overcome them.
  • Learn about the different types of prototypes and when to use them.
  • Learn about fidelity and the different components and levels.
  • Walk away with a useful tool (prototypes) to bring back to your teams that will get them iterating.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Perri

Melissa Perri

CEO of ProdUX Labs, Melissa Perri
Melissa Perri is a product manager, UX designer and speaker based in New York City. As CEO of ProdUX Labs, Melissa works on strategy and training for product management and UX teams around the world. As a practitioner and coach, she tackles her clients’ toughest product problems to find the best solutions. Melissa is the UX/UI coach at the Wayra Accelerator in London. She also teaches in NYC.
avatar for Josh Wexler

Josh Wexler

Director, Originate
Josh Wexler is an expert on early stage software innovation and prototyping process. He is currently a director of solutions at Originate, a digital product development firm. Previously, his company, Occom, was acquired by Originate. Occom was a firm offering ideation and product management as a service. Occom provided a way for clients to visualize and test, with actual users, any new software application before any code has been written... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10/11

14:00

Towards A Theory & Methodology Of Test-Driven Design (Jonathan Berger)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Years ago, Developers had problems and devised Agile techniques to address them. Today, Designers face similar problems. Can we adopt similar techniques? In this talk, we'll explore what automated testing might look like for design. What would it look like to have a more defined definition of "done" for design? What if designers could refactor with impunity? We'll explore testing possibilities for Visual design, User Experience design, and front-end engineering, and suggest a testing pyramid for design as a path forward.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How TDD ideas can support design and UX practices. How to practice various design testing techniques. How to focus design work and expectations around definitions of "done" that the whole team can agree on.



Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Berger

Jonathan Berger

Principal, Discovery Studio
Jonathan Berger is a designer, developer and technologist who has been active in the NYC technology scene since around 2005, helping to organize events like the Agile Experience Design Meetup, the Pivotal Labs Tech Talk series in NY, Startup Weekend, Barcamp, Fashioncamp, and IgniteNYC. He spends his days building software with Pivotal Labs and his nights and weekends working on Market Publique. Prior to that, he earned a Bachelors in... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 6/7

14:00

Be More Than a Proxy (Diane Zajac-Woodie)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As a business analyst on an agile team, do you spend your time gathering decisions from stakeholders and passing them on to development teams? Are you tired of simply being a “proxy without power”? And product owners, you have the power to make decisions on behalf of stakeholders, but is that your only interaction with the team? How can you do more to boost your impact?
Be more than a proxy.
By definition, a proxy means doing a thing “by the authority to represent someone else.” BAs, product owners, and product managers can all act as proxies by representing their customers and other business units. But too often, they limit themselves to specifying requirements and/or answering business questions for the team.
In this workshop, Diane Zajac-Woodie shows you how to go beyond those tasks and become more than a proxy. Through some experiential exercises, you will feel the impact of fast, frequent feedback on results. Diane also teaches you how to capture requirements collaboratively, using an acceptance test format. You will get to practice describing the exact behaviors that you expect in a format that everyone understands.
Coupled with facilitation skills and simple tools like story maps, you can learn to foster a collaborative environment. Be inspired to embrace your role in an agile environment and leave with new techniques that ensure that you will be more than a proxy when you head back to work next week.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience the positive impact that fast, frequent feedback has on results
  • Give some examples of how to use light-weight documentation
  • Explain what a story map is and why they are useful
  • Describe the timing of "just in time" requirements
  • Name several benefits to writing requirements collaboratively
  • Write requirements in a descriptive, collaborative format
  • List at least 3 skills that are valuable on an agile team



Speakers
avatar for Diane Zajac-Woodie

Diane Zajac-Woodie

Agent of Change, Green Jeans Consulting
http://www.greenjeansconsulting.com/ http://agilesquirrel.blogspot.com/


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 1/2/3

14:45

8 Years Agile - From Startup ScrumMaster to Agile Coaching Group at a company of 500. (Heidi Helfand)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As a startup, we felt so strongly about XP and Scrum that we implemented them from a rather command and control perspective. Team dissatisfaction emerged. We dramatically changed our approach. What resulted was the development of a culture based on autonomy, team building and trust. We grew from having a dedicated ScrumMaster into a group of Internal coaches supporting self-organizing teams that choose how they work. In this experience report I will share the ScrumMaster's perspective in particular, and how we organize our Internal Agile Coaching Group.

Learning Outcomes:


  • -Participants will…

  • -see why you might hire a ScrumMaster at a startup to remove company level impediments beyond engineering

  • -be exposed to the concept of Anzeneering and focusing on the needs and feelings of the team as a guiding force

  • -understand the value of retrospectives and qualitative research for guiding the evolution of Agile at a company

  • -gain an awareness of different schools of professional coaching for application in team building

  • -get an example of how an internal agile coaching group with a professional coaching approach is structured





Speakers
avatar for Heidi Helfand

Heidi Helfand

Principal Agile Coach, Independent
Heidi Helfand is an independent consultant who has spent the last 17 years coaching and influencing cross-functional teams at pioneering web software companies. At Expertcity, Inc. (acquired by CitrixOnline) she was on the initial team that built GoToMyPC, GoToMeeting and GoToWebinar, the products which have made Citrix Online one of the largest SAAS companies in the world. She was Principal Agile Coach at AppFolio, Inc., a SAAS workflow software... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:45 - 15:15
Potomac 4

15:45

Facing Fake-To-Fake: Lessons Learned from Distributed Scrum (Vincent Tietz)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Agile and distribution is not a contradiction. The agile principles seem to compensate the risks in distributed development scenarios. This is what the Saxonia Systems AG has learned from numerous distributed projects. With the introduction of agile methods, we seem work significantly better. But, why? This presentation analyzes the main risks in distributed setups and shows how agile principles have impact on the team collaboration and motivation. We show what we have learned from past projects and what we have done to support distributed teams. Finally, we provide an overview about the four pillars of distributed and agile software development: 1) the distributed project room, 2) the tools, 3) the adopted processes and roles, and 4) the motivated team. Finally, we show how these aspects result in our concept ETEO (“Ein Team – Ein Office” which is german and means “one team – one office”) which boosts distributed teams.
The distributed project room consists of a digital scrum board, a high definition video conferencing system which is always on and a general room setup for working and meeting periods. Today, collaboration tools for code review, video chat, screen sharing, synchronized boards and others, support many tasks within a distributed scrum team. Further, we identified additional skills for team members and especially the Scrum Master. As the title suggests, the face-to-face communication is limited which might be experienced as non-natural or "faked". Therefore, we introduced tools to improve awareness and expressiveness of each team member. Finally, the whole team needs to reflect their working culture and should be supported by specialized coaching tools. Continuously, the implementation of the agile principles need to be reviewed to keep the team efficient and motivated. Ignoring at least one of these facts, may lead to dangerous and unpredictable projects, wherein the team needs to invest much time to find out how to work distributed and efficient.
Learning Outcomes:
  • challenges and pitfalls when implementing distributed agile
  • setup of a distributed project room,
  • required tool classes and tool examples,
  • adopted processes and team roles and
  • tools to improve awareness and expressiveness for a truthful team communication
Attachments:

Speakers
VT

Vincent Tietz

Saxonia Systems AG


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 16:15
Potomac 4

15:45

Introduction to Agile Leadership: Recognizing and Removing Impediments (Thomas Perry)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
When not uncovered and resolved, impediments can do harm to an otherwise well run project in ways that are often subtle and easy to miss. If impediments undermine the success of our teams, then we as project managers, leaders, and stakeholders should all be very passionate about removing impediments. In order to accomplish this we need to do three things: we need to give impediments the proper attention, we need to become experts at uncovering them, and we need to integrate them into the process of continuous improvement within the team.
Learning Outcomes:
  • This session will give you hands on experience with impediment busting tools you can apply with your own team.
  • An understanding of the fundamentals of impediment tracking, management, and removal that you can apply to any project.
  • If you are already managing impediments for your team, then this session will give you a few new creative ideas that you can try out as well.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Sr. Principal Transformation Coach, CA
Tom has been working in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management, agile coaching/mentoring and training. As part of his involvement in the greater agile community, he led the Seattle eastside chapter of the APLN. Tom speaks at a wide variety of software... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

15:45

Example Driven Design: Creating Story Maps with Examples (David Hussman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Story maps are great tools for visualizing story relationships and promoting richer product design discussions. They are also great tools for fostering collaboration across skills and roles. UX people mapping with developers and testers can share skills around user centered thinking and other design concepts. If you would like to get quickly into story mapping, example driven mapping is simple, powerful and quick to learn.
You need to show up ready to work. You’ll quickly see that driving a mapping session with examples is a great way to get started but also a great tool for connecting people with different perspectives. Examples being another form of speaking in testable language draws in testers and more quickly surface deeper challenges that arise from testing that cuts across stories (regression testing). Examples also challenge us to keep a user context that spans stories which is of interest to UX people. Last, but not least, example provide a vehicle for the cross cutting thinking needed to create an architectural road map that is product focused and frame customer journeys that replace getting things done iteratively with customer experience validations.
If you are sick of backlogs that are merely to do list, or you want to cast a wider net for your product thinking, show up with one or more examples to explore. If you are not sure what I mean by example, think about someone trying to do something specific with your product (or system) and you’ll be on your way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Introduction to story mapping
  • - Using examples to create maps adds context and helps write fewer of the wrong stories
  • - Examples cut across stories and connect regression testing that also spans stories / iterations
  • - Example help infuse user context into story mapping
  • - Examples ask for value up front, promoting sort of a test driven product value
  • - Attendees will leave with maps they can take back to their team / company



Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
I split my time between leading DevJam and coaching at client sites. My coaching ranges from small teams to large enterprises and entails working with teams, programs and leadership groups. Some days I am doing discovery work, teaching product thinking and agile design and augmenting real agility with user centered design and user experience tools. Other days I am deep in the delivery space helping teams adapt agile methods to meet their needs... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac C

15:45

Are We Doomed to Sticky, Tricky, & Icky?: Women and Men Working Together on Agile Teams (Sharon Buckmaster, Diana Larsen)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you a woman working in software development, or are you a man who cares whether women can fully contribute at work? Have you experienced or heard about situations at work that were complicated by issues about women and men working together? If you answered “yes” to the first question, more than likely you also answered “yes” to the second. Difficult working relationship are endemic when gender expectations clash. We can do better.
Join Sharon and Diana in this session that will explore practical solutions to this tough problem through lively conversations. We will turn actual real life experiences into opportunities to learn from each other's situations, to establish working agreements for acceptable and mutually beneficial professionalism, and to diminish the impact of harassing behavior on individual targets by exploring a greater sense of personal power.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will take away:
  • Better understanding of the obstacles to and enablers of healthy collaboration between women and men at work
  • A list of strategies to apply back on the job, including avenues for taking action
  • Stories/examples of “good practices” that work well in other organizations and might work for you
  • A perspective on the scope of the problem and an awareness of the benefit of making situations visible
Attachments:

Speakers
SB

Sharon Buckmaster

FutureWorks Consulting LLC
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

partner, FutureWorks Consulting LLC
http://www.futureworksconsulting.com/about/diana-larsen


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

Scaling the Social Fabric of Agility (Eric Willeke)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Congratulations! You've received incredible benefit from adopting agile approaches with your teams, and you're exploring and implementing tools to expand those benefits to ever-larger efforts involving more people, bigger goals, and much higher cost and impact for your company. This is the moment when every group needs to struggle with one of the most important challenges: How do we sustain and grow the social dynamics that have made agile successful? Agile processes, regardless of approach, are successful because of changes in how people work together, and failure to address this challenge early typically results in a "big dump process model", rarely resulting in meaningful, sustained change to the organization.
This talk explains six collaboration-focused perspectives and tactics that are consistently found valuable when focusing multiple agile teams on a single larger outcome. The collaboration techniques covered include one shared goal, two axes of engagement, three steering councils, the new gang of four, fist of five, and the six supporting roles. Designing your team of teams considering these six techniques will accelerate your improvement journey and improve your likelihood of successfully implementing any scaling model at the program level. These patterns are extracted from experiences helping launch and evolve programs using multiple scaling approaches (including SAFe, multi-team Scrum, and scaled kanban approaches) across a variety of companies and industries (more than 20 different agile programs of 50-150 people).
Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize the human element of SAFe release trains
  • Seed the social structures that drive real agility
  • Amplify individual excellence across the release train
  • Reduce risk of SAFe being a “big dumb framework”
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Eric Willeke

Eric Willeke

Advisor: Enterprise Agility, CA Technologies
Eric Willeke is an experienced transformation consultant with deep Agile expertise and an extensive history of working with enterprise customers. Eric guides CA|Rally’s largest customers through their complex Agile adoption and transformation efforts, helping them build capability to sustainably and successfully deliver on the needs of their business. For more than a decade, his personal vision statement, “Helping everybody on a project sleep... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13

15:45

Open Source Patterns of Cloud Native Architectures (Andrew Clay Shafer, josh long)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Mobile and the looming internet of things initiatives are driving organizations to adopt cloud technologies and methodologies as software must be delivered at an ever increasing scale. We've all read 'Release It!' and 'Continuous Delivery', but some things are easier said than done and there is so much to do. Luckily, we live in a time when people have solved common problems and made the solution freely available. In this session, we'll look at the manifestation of ideas like circuit breakers, load balancing, service discovery and other related microservices through the lens of the NetflixOSS and Spring Cloud open source libraries deployed to Cloud Foundry. We'll walk through how cloud native patterns are used to build fault tolerant architectures, can be optimal for continuous delivery, require a technical baseline and finish with a nod to leveraging Conway's Law to design your architecture and your org chart.
Learning Outcomes:
  • basic understanding of cloud native architectures contrasted with last generation enterprise architecture
  • introduction to microservices and prerequisites of managing them
  • basic vocabulary around microservices, continuous delivery, devops, how they fit together and reinforce each other
  • patterns for service discovery, fault tolerance, graceful degradation, identity and horizontal scalability
  • map that list of common cloud native architecture patterns, the problems they are solving and examples using NetflixOSS and Spring Cloud deployed to Cloud Foundry
  • demonstrations and github repos with the code


Speakers
avatar for Andrew Clay Shafer

Andrew Clay Shafer

Clown Prince, Parvus Captus
we do what we can


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

Rescuing legacy software from impending doom (Refactoring from the trenches) (Martin Cronje, Jacques De Vos)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Dealing with an ageing code base is one of the hardest challenges that software development teams face. Legacy code bases can slow teams to a crawl, and therefore it is critical to solve this on the road to agility.
Software rewrites fail at alarming rates! Refactoring - a safer approach - has emerged as the de-facto technique to tackle this challenge.
In this interactive session we will equip attendees with techniques and lessons to help them refactor more effectively. We will share our experience gained while working with various software teams, from start-ups to mid-sized, that attempted to rescue their legacy from impending doom.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Effectively justify the investment in refactoring legacy code to Product Owners.
  • When and how to apply different refactoring workflows on legacy code.
  • Practical tips to avoid common pitfalls when refactoring code.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martin Cronje

Martin Cronje

Founder and Developer Coach, nReality
Martin Cronje is a software developer who spends most of his time coaching software teams to help them master their craft. Over his 15 year career he has contributed to projects ranging from mobile, data analytics to high volume mission-critical systems in government and financial sectors. The most notable projects directly affected the South African economy and democracy. When not coaching he spends his time keeping the sword sharp by building... Read More →
avatar for Jacques de Vos

Jacques de Vos

Founder, Developer and Coach, nReality
With more than 10 years of experience in leading development teams on cutting-edge software systems, Jacques is driven to build systems, teams and processes that not only address immediate project needs, but also enable clients to meet their strategic goals.Most of his experience has been in developing crucial font-end applications, specifically in the financial industries: online trading, online banking, insurance and branch banking.Besides... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

15:45

The 10 Myths of DevOps (Seth Vargo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Although not officially coined until 2009, DevOps ideals have been explicitly discussed since at least 2006. Recently, however, the term "DevOps" has gained increasing popularity across a variety of fields and industries. DevOps is not a development methodology or technology; DevOps is an ideology. It is a way to facilitate organizational prosperity and growth while increasing each individual employee's happiness along the way. As DevOps has gained in prominence, a gap has been created between the original definition of DevOps and this new "enterprise-ready" buzzword.
For organizations beginning DevOps practices, this talk will provide a 10,000ft view of DevOps and how you can properly implement DevOps practices in your organization. For organizations that are currently practicing DevOps, this talk will cover common pitfalls, ways to sustain a happy culture, and new tips to foster organizational prosperity.
Learning Outcomes:
  • After this session, attendees will have a firmer understanding of DevOps is, and more important what DevOps isn't. They will be empowered to facilitate change in their organization, while avoiding common pitfalls new organizations trying to "implement DevOps" experience.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Seth Vargo

Seth Vargo

Software Engineer & Evangelist, HashiCorp
Seth Vargo has been a member of the DevOps community for about five years. He is a polyglot software engineer and open source advocate at at HashiCorp. Previously, Seth worked at Chef (Opscode), CustomInk, and a few Pittsburgh-based startups. He is a co-author of O'Reilly's "Learning Chef" and is passionate about inequality in technology and organizational culture. When he is not writing software or working on open source, Seth enjoys speaking at... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Agile Capitalization: Invest in the Future (Dan Greening, John Horton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
In many companies, agile software development is misunderstood and misreported, increasing taxes, volatility in profit and loss (P&L) and costly manual time-tracking. Agile and Scrum teams inherently create production cost data that are more verifiable, better documented, and more closely aligned with known customer value than most waterfall implementations. Better reporting can mean significant tax savings and greater investor interest.
Explore the theory, benefits, regulations, and real-world examples of capitalizing software developed using agile practices. You will learn from members of the team that pioneered defensible agile capitalization practices in a $10B publicly traded company.
Leave with the understanding and resources to lead an agile capitalization effort at your company. Save weeks of research and investigation by attending this powerful briefing.
Learning Outcomes:


  • Improve the company’s P&L

  • Reduce or eliminate need to track actual hours

  • Free up working capital for innovation and growth in software development

  • Reduce future tax burden

  • Improve verifiability for internal and external auditors

  • Increase clarity for shareholders on investments and operational expenses


Attachments:


Speakers
avatar for Dan Greening

Dan Greening

Enterprise Coach, LeadingAgile
I teach, coach and consult on Scrum and agile management practices for CxOs and below. I have served in product and engineering leadership positions in startups and software enterprises. I focus on long-term value creation while implementing and sustaining agility. Unlike some colleagues, I strongly believe managers should add significant strategic value to agile companies. At the same time, I coach and teach engineering teams and departments, to... Read More →
avatar for John Horton

John Horton

Principal Consultant, Senex Rex



Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

So what do we do with the architects? (Ryan Bergman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
You’ve made the switch to agile. You stopped doing comprehensive documentation and you have self directed teams that value emergent design right?. Then you notice that you forgot to give the architects something to do. Architecture is an activity that all teams need to perform and you might just have some experienced individuals around to help lead and guide them. In this presentation we will talk about what software architecture is, how teams accomplish it, and where the people traditionally called “architects” fit in an agile world.
Learning Outcomes:
  • When finished, participants should have a clear understanding of the different activities that architects perform and how self directed teams can accomplish them.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Big Nerd, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include SAAS architecture, application usability, CI, and testing at all levels.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7

15:45

Agile Data Warehousing/Business Intelligence: A Disciplined Approach (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Agile strategies are being applied on more-and-more data warehouse (DW)/business intelligence (BI) projects within government agencies than ever before. The heavy, serial, long-running traditional approaches of yesteryear are being cautiously abandoned for the lighter, collaborative, incremental approaches resulting from agile and lean thinking. But how does this work in practice? Agile strategies call into question virtually every single practice that the data community holds dear, and are often at odds with existing IT governance strategies, so how are agencies reconciling this in practice?
This presentation overviews both an agile and a lean strategy for teams developing a DW/BI solution. These strategies are based on a tailoring of the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) and Data Vault 2.0 (DV2) frameworks. We begin with a review of the differences between the traditional and agile ways of thinking, what the implications are for your organization, and how this can impact government agencies in the process of moving towards more agile ways of working. We then overview two lifecycles for DW/BI development, a Scrum-based agile strategy for the first release of a DW/BI solution and a lean Kanban-based strategy for future releases. Strategies for successfully initiating an agile DW/BI team will be covered, including how to weave user stories, agile data modelling, agile architectural modelling, and light-weight release planning together. A collection of agile database techniques will be overviewed, including agile data modelling, database testing, database refactoring, continuous database integration, and DV2 design strategies. The presentation ends with a summary of the people, process, and tooling challenges that you will face when transitioning to an agile approach on your DW/BI teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover why an agile/lean approach to DW/BI is preferred
  • Learn how successfully initiate an agile DW/BI team
  • Learn how to take agile and lean approaches to DW/BI development
  • Discover a collection of agile development practices for DW/BI teams
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Scott Ambler + Associates
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational level. Scott is the founder of the Agile Modeling (AM), Agile Data (AD), Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), and Enterprise Unified Process (EUP) methodologies. He... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac D

15:45

Thawing the “Frozen Middle” (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Is working with middle management the bane of your existence? Is middle management preventing progress with your agile adoption? Are the teams you are coaching being stifled by middle management? Or are you a middle manager trapped in the system struggling to break out and make a difference for your organisation? If you answered yes to any of the above questions then this session is for you!
Middle management, also known as the "frozen middle", are often bemoaned as blockers to progress. It never fails to amaze me how often a conversation in a room full of agile coaches will turn to the topic of “what to do about middle management”. Frequently the solutions I hear proposed are along the lines of “work around them” or “get rid of them”. In this session we will explore a different approach. Instead of removing middle management from the picture, how can we harness their energy to lead rather than hinder an agile transition?
In this interactive presentation, Em will share with you what it is like to be part of middle management, help you tap into your empathy by putting yourself in the shoes of middle management and provide you with numerous proven techniques to help managers at any level (frozen or otherwise!) accelerate their transition into agile leaders.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Insight into the life of a middle manager
  • A brief introduction to Empathy Mapping
  • Numerous practical tools for helping managers at any level become agile leaders
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Partner, Context Matters
Em is a Partner at Context Matters, Australia's leading Enterprise Agile consultancy. After close to 20 years in business management roles within multinational blue chip corporations, Em discovered Agile and became passionate about the chance it provides to align business and IT around the delivery of value. In 2012, she launched Australia’s first Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Agile Release Train. The story of the cultural transformation that... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

15:45

Games to Learn Stuff (Michael McCullough, Don McGreal)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
This fun, energetic, and interactive session will explore the concept of experiential learning and how it helps in conveying Agile values and principles which are often misunderstood or abused. The audience will experience games that target each of the three major learning vectors: physical, emotional, and impressional.
This session is for Agile trainers, people looking to learn about Agile in a different way, or anyone who has experienced the challenges in conveying agile concepts. After a quick introduction on the difficulty in learning values and principles, the audience will play four or five games selected to demonstrate different styles and topics.
All games and instructions will be made available on TastyCupcakes.org for reference.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the principles behind Agile in a fun and interactive way
  • Understand the different types of games and where to apply them
  • Learn new and powerful techniques to convey Agile principles behind agile such as:
  • - Why games are important for learning
  • - Why we need empirical approaches to software development
  • - How self-organization works and why it is more efficient
  • - Why starting with specification and test is a better way to work
  • - Why context-switching is costly to your team
  • Have fun
Attachments:

Speakers
MM

Michael McCullough

Executive Technical Director, Quadrus
Michael is Executive Technical Director with Quadrus - Improving Enterprises Calgary. Michael leads the training and advisory services for Quadrus Agile Scrum and Kanban services.Michael has been working with business and product companies helping to improve product innovation and systems development for over 15 years. Michael is an experienced consultant and trainer with practical experience delivering projects and improvements to... Read More →
DM

Don McGreal

VP of Learning, Improving Enterprises
In his role as VP of Learning Solutions at Improving Enterprises, Don McGreal is a hands-on agile consultant and instructor.He specializes in agile coaching at the enterprise and team levels within larger organizations.In his role as VP of Learning Solutions at Improving Enterprises, Don McGreal is a hands-on agile consultant and instructor.He specializes in agile coaching at the enterprise and team levels within larger organizations. Don is a... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 1/2/3

15:45

Budgeting vs Estimating for Agile Projects (Debbie Madden, Rex Madden)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Nearly every software development project starts with one question: "How much is this going to cost?" Want to learn a powerful 4 step, tactical approach to budgeting that gives you the confidence to answer this question well and that takes 20% of the time than estimating? Read on.
The Problem
Product managers and stakeholders are constantly deciding, “Should I build this?”, "How big a team do I need?", “Which features should I build next?”, "How long will this take" or "What will I get by X date?" Knowing whether a project is going to take a few weeks or several months is a big factor. But estimating software projects is hard. You're trying to predict the future. Realistically, teams will usually be off by 40% to 50%, maybe even 100% or 200% (http://bit.ly/1yGeybG). And estimating takes time: even the lightest-weight Agile processes take several hours...sometimes even days or weeks. Finally, detailed overly-specific estimates end up restricting creativity. In the end, paying a lot of time for poor estimates that helped lead to the #noestimates movement, with teams refusing to do any estimates up front.
The Truth
Most people know estimates aren’t perfect, but they’d still like to have some sense of scale. “Are we talking days, weeks or months?” is often enough to make a good business decision. After all, a set of features might sound good if it’s 1-3 weeks, but might not be worth it if they’re 1-3 months.
The truth is: It's still the responsibility of the technical team to provide these estimates. Why? Because technical teams are the ones that have the most relevant knowledge to answer the question.
The Solution
We’ve got a powerful solution. For strategic and high level decisions: Stop estimating, start budgeting. We walk you through a tactical, 4 step solution that you can use in your job today to budget both new projects as well as ones that are in progress. We will show you how to fit the process to the decision, doing just enough estimating to satisfy the business side. We will also show you how to present your estimate as a range of outcomes so that you can reinforce the “inexactness” of the estimating process.
Who's This For?
This is truly valuable for anyone on an Agile team that wants or needs to know "How long is this project going to take?", "What features will get done by X date?" or "How many people should I put on this project?" If you are a Product Manager, Project Manager, CTO, VP Engineering, Developer, Stakeholder, CEO, then you will want to attend this session.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Decision-Making - Step 1 of 4 of our tactical solution walks through the importance of clarifying the true decisions you are making. You'll learn how to get to the root of 'Why' you need to know "How much this is going to cost?" and you'll learn techniques you can use to determine if Estimating or Budgeting is the right tool for your specific decision.
  • Probability Calibration - You get to try your hand and probability calibration. Most people aren’t as good at it as we think. Most people are either generally over confident or under confident in their estimations. We teach you techniques on how to level yourself to get better at accurately 'guessing' an appropriate range of how long something will take.
  • Monte Carlo Simulation - We show you how to run your calibrated probability guesses them a Monte Carlo simulation 1000's of times. The result is a range of cost and time results that you can be confident in.
  • Budgeting New and Existing Projects - We teach you how to budget a brand new project as well as use feedback from in progress projects to continue to refine your budget model, in a way that embraces variability and risk inside Agile projects. We walk through a sample project and teach you how to get a realistic budget in 20% of the time it takes to do a full Agile estimating sessions, by using Monte Carlo simulations, or by using Ballpark (www.stridenyc.com/ballpark)


Speakers
avatar for Debbie Madden

Debbie Madden

CEO, Stride
Debbie is the CEO of Stride (www.stridenyc.com), NYC's premier Agile software development consultancy. We help technical teams be their best, both inside the code and out. We embed, colocate with you to add capacity, build products, improve process. And, we launch MVPs and build complex full stack enterprise products.Debbie has built 5 companies from the ground up, and has been CEO of 3 of them. Most recently, she grew Cyrus to a 5-time Inc... Read More →
RM

Rex Madden

CTO, Stride
Tinkering, learning, improving are my passions. As the Technical Co-Founder of Stride, I am bringing 19 years of running startups to the NYC tech community. I've run and formed 5 startups and have been writing code my entire life. Agile software development and Lean Startup drive my thinking. I'm constantly looking for ways to help businesses improve through software. Whether that's using a new technology or improving the team process... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 5/6

15:45

Stalwarts: Craig Larman and Bas Vodde (Bas Vodde, Craig Larman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Craig Larman and Bas Vodde

Craig Larman, named one of the top 20 Agile influencers of all time, is the co-creator of LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum). Since 2005 he has worked with clients to apply the LeSS framework for scaling lean thinking and agile development to large, multisite, and offshore development. Craig is the author of several books, most recently Large-Scale Scrum: More with LeSS and the popular Agile & Iterative Development: A Manager's Guide. He is one of the first Certified Scrum Trainers and Practicing ScrumMasters, starting in the 1990s while at Chevron Research. Other clients include Xerox, Ericsson, JP Morgan, Cisco-Tandberg, Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, Alcatel-Lucent, UBS, bwin.party, Nokia Networks, Siemens Networks, and Ion Trading. Craig also served as chief scientist at Valtech and, while living in Bengaluru India at Valtech’s development centre, helped to create agile offshore development with LeSS.

Bas Vodde is the creator of Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS), a framework for scaling agile development. He authored Scaling Agile and Lean Development, Practices for Scaling Agile and Lean Development and the upcoming Large-Scale Scrum books. Bas led the Agile adoption in Nokia Networks and is involved with Agile adoptions in several large banks. He is the director of The LeSS Company and founder of Odd-e, an Agile software development, coaching, and training company in Asia. He is also the maintainer of the CppUTest C++ unit test framework and the Osaka Mac GUI automation library.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.







Speakers
avatar for Craig Larman

Craig Larman

assistant dishwasher
Biography: http://www.craiglarman.com/wiki/index.php?title=Craig_Larman
avatar for Bas Vodde

Bas Vodde

Odd-e
Bas Vodde is a coach, programmer, trainer, and author related to modern agile and lean product development. He is the creator of the LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework for scaling agile development. He coaches organizations on three levels: organizational,  team,  individual/technical practices. He has trained thousands of people in software development, Scrum, and modern agile practices for over a decade. He is the author... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 2

15:45

Example Mapping (Matt Wynne)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
In this session I'll teach you a simple, practical technique that you can use to break down any user story.
BDD and ATDD enthusiasts already know how useful it is to have the three amigos - tester, product owner and developer - meet to discuss a new user story before they start development. What many teams don't have is a clear structure for these conversations. Sometimes they can take a long time, or drain the group's energy by going round in circles.
Over many years of teaching hundreds of people about BDD, I've developed a simple practical technique that will allow you to break down a story in about 25 minutes. All you need is a pack of coloured index cards, some pens, and a curious attitude.

Learning Outcomes:
  • the purpose of a three amigos session
  • a practical technique for visualising what you know, and don't know about a user story
  • the difference between rules and examples



Speakers
avatar for Matt Wynne

Matt Wynne

Co-founder, director, Chief Mountaineering Officer, Cucumber Limited
Matt is one of the world's leading BDD practitioners. A programmer, coach, trainer and popular international speaker, he was as invited to join the Cucumber core team in 2009. Together with Aslak Hellesøy, the creator of Cucumber, he's co-author ofThe Cucumber Book, Behaviour-Driven Development for Developers and Testers. In 2014, they founded Cucumber Limited together with Julien Biezemans. | Matt has worked with large organisations like... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 3

15:45

Agile Contracts: Blast Off to the Zone of Collaborative Systems Building (Drew Jemilo)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Agile has moved far beyond commercial software into the world’s largest enterprises and government agencies. We have scaling methods which can help launch vehicles into the atmosphere and beyond, yet traditional contract mindsets have put a drag on escape velocity. But there’s good news! We have agile explorers discovering the next frontier of contract agility. Join us for this session and enter the new era!
TRADITIONAL MODELS TO LEAN-AGILE APPROACHES
Fixed requirements, big up-front design, and gated processes have been the norm. The rationale seemed logical in the past. It would not make sense to award a contract or commit to a major development investment without knowing what the system is supposed to do, how much it costs, and when it will be completed. We assumed that complex systems could be fully defined before they were built, that requirements and solutions would not change, and that we could build it right the first time.
Traditional models exist:
  • Fixed Price (also known as Firm Fixed Fee/FFF)
  • Time and Materials (also known as Cost Plus Firm Fixed Fee)
But Lean-Agile approaches are gaining momentum:
  • Variable cost with price ceilings
  • Variable scope driven by vision and backlogs
  • Innovation in timeboxes to explore and exploit new opportunities
  • Fixed quality based on sound technical practices, with “good enough” defined up front
SYSTEM INTENT IN THREE ZONES
We need to balance what is fixed and what is variable to achieve the intent of the system.
  • The Zone of False Expectations – Here, we believe we can define up front what is needed and that we can build it right the first time. For complex systems, we live in a zone of false expectations if we choose a pure Fixed Price or Time and Materials contract. Implementations can crash and burn.
  • The Zone of Innovation and Exploration – Here, you can use a Time and Materials model which operates within a timebox and high level scope reflecting the intent of the innovation and exploration. Undreamed ideas can soar.
  • The Zone of Collaborative Systems Building – This is the zone most enterprises strive for. A hybrid contract based on context can be our launch pad.
ENTERING THE ZONE OF COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS BUILDING
To enter this zone, we need a contracting model which supports realistic outcomes, balances non-negotiables, and builds trusting relationships. An agile guidance system will align procurement officers, lawyers, business sponsors, and project managers for contract agility!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify traditional contract constructs and communicate how they inhibit agility
  • Explain emerging Lean-Agile approaches to contracts in the private and public sectors
  • Understand and explain the "Three Zones of System Intent" model to provide a conceptual contract framework
  • Know how to apply the "Three Zones" model to balance Fixed Priced and Time and Materials terms
  • Identify additional contract terms to enable collaborative systems building
  • Gather the tools to change traditional mindsets which inhibit Agile Contracts
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Drew Jemilo

Drew Jemilo

CTO, Scaled Agile, Inc.
Drew is an enterprise Agile consultant, a principal contributor to the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), and a Scaled Agile Academy instructor. After starting his career at Anderson Consulting in the late 80s and early 90s, he moved to Van Kampen Funds, a subsidiary of Morgan Stanley, where he used early adaptive methods to define and build new software products and to migrate off their legacy systems. Following that, he joined a private startup... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 8

16:30

One Step at a Time Towards One Bug a Month (Csaba Patkos)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
I believe great programmers can create unique software in a way it was never done before. This is a story about me joining a team and how we
came a long way from a traditional development process to an agile one. We will contemplate on the events and decisions that led from chaos to
order and from strict rules to a happy workplace. A place where a complete enterprise storage solution is made with almost no bugs found in
production, thanks to a team ever open to change and continuous learning.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of change in agile.
  • Ideas about how to implement Scrum or Lean practices in a not yet agile environment.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Csaba Patkós

Csaba Patkós

Software Engineering Team Lead, Syneto
Really good technology must help us from our grumpy morning wakeup until we fell asleep at night. This is why I go to work every day. By being the lead software developer at Syneto I contribute to the building of the next generation storage devices, and hopefully a technologically better World. I fulfill my professional dream by writing software, managing teams, leading and mentoring others, and sharing my vision through conferences like this.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Potomac 4

17:30

Industry Analyst Panel Discussion: Agile Trends and Future Directions
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Hear from leading industry analysts as they discuss the latest trends and emerging best practices around Agile software development. Learn how the most successful software organizations are utilizing Agile to drive business performance. Find out how the latest innovations in Agile practices continue to mature as development organizations deploy Agile further across the enterprise.

This year's theme is Agile Trends and Future Directions. Join us to hear unique perspectives and gain industry knowledge from this year's participants:


  • Melinda Ballou, IT Industry Analyst, IDC

  • Steve Dennning, Author & Management Consultant

  • André Girard, Senior Analyst, VDC Research Group

  • Tom Grant, Senior Consultant, Cutter Consortium

  • Ron Jeffries, Extreme Programming (XP) Innovator, Author, Coach, and Trainer

  • Jim Newkirk, VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud (Moderator)




Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:30
Potomac C
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

09:00

Individuals, Interactions and Improvization (Jessie Shternshus)
Abstract:
As Agile Practitioners, we strive to make ourselves, our team and our delivery better. We can do this by being open to learning new ideas from other disciplines. Jessie's keynote, "Individuals, Interactions and Improvisation" will be fun and interactive. In it, Jessie will share stories and exercises from the world of Improvisation.
There are many parallels between agile team principles and the principles of Improvisation. Effective improvisers give their teammates unconditional support. They practice active listening and accept and build on each other's ideas. Jessie will explore these ideas and more. She will help and guide you in making your agile interactions more effective.
Jessie founded The Improv Effect in 2007. Her goal was to help businesses reach their full potential through interpersonal-communication skills training. They use an array of experiential techniques to transform teams and organizations. These cover teamwork, creative problem solving, on-boarding, presentation skills, and product development ideation sessions. Jessie also recently published a book called "CTRLShift: 50 Games For 50 ****ing Days Like today".

Learning Outcomes:
  • .




Wednesday August 5, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac A/B

10:45

National Geographic: How To Implement Agile Processes In A 127 year old Magazine Tradition (Constance Miller)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
What do you get when you mix a magazine that's 127 years old, some Agile training, a small team of designers, programmers, producers, photo editors, and a scrum master, and tell them to build mobile-first? You get a transformation. National Geographic magazine's digital designs were deeply rooted in the magazine, as were many of the processes, but it was time for a change. Here's how the digital team at National Geographic went through the transition from print-first to mobile-first, the ups and downs, and the continued learning of how to work together in a collaborative, transparent, and iterative way.

Learning Outcomes:


  • Steps to take when considering implementing an Agile framework

  • How to evangelize Agile processes in your organization

  • Ways to support staff while pulling them through the transition to Agile

  • How to be consistent and strong when getting push back from existing staff

  • How humor and humility go a long way when working with a group in transition





Speakers
CM

Constance Miller

Digital Media, National Geographic


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Potomac 4

10:45

Introduction to Agile Product Management (Rich Mironov)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Product owner is a critical role for agile/scrum teams, as a key stakeholder and representative of users, customers or markets. Commercial software companies have a broader role -- product manager -- responsible for identifying market needs/opportunities, making product-level decisions about offerings/benefits/pricing/packaging/channels/financial goals, and managing sales/customer relationships on behalf of executives. Since products often span multiple scrum teams, some products have a mix of product owners and product managers.
We'll introduce product owners, map that against software product managers, and talk through approaches to meet all of the product needs for a market-successful product.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - what is a product owner?
  • - for revenue software companies, how does this align with product manager?
  • - failure modes for product owners/managers and strategies to avoid those failures
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

10:45

Coaching Flow: Moving Past Resistance (Mike Lowery, Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
“They are resisting the changes I am trying to implement!” It’s a common refrain when people don’t embrace a change with the speed or enthusiasm desired. Do you keep pushing, give up or call in the big guns? How you respond to resistance can doom the change to failure, or boost the chance of success.
As coaches, we introduce new ideas in many different contexts. Relying on positional authority (our role as coach), or calling on outside authority (the managers who hired us) isn't likely to get those ideas a fair hearing.
In this talk, Mike and Esther will help you see resistance from a new perspective. By understanding how much influence you have, what forces are interacting around you and seeing different ways to re-frame your issues you can still get your message across without “inflicting help” on others.
Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Re-framing coaching problems by focusing on your relationships and sources of power other than positional power.
  • 2. Understand the sources of power and their appropriate contexts
  • 3. Real connections that make a real difference take time and real effort
  • 4. The key factors that help us to connect to others
  • 5. How to map and understand the relationships around you
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

esther derby associates, inc.
avatar for Mike Lowery

Mike Lowery

Senior Agile Specialist, Mxi
An advocate for continuous improvement and Agile delivery. An Agile coach who’s in it for more than just a trendy label, in fact he’s the opposite of trendy labels. A certified Master of scrums with practical experience to share. Mike first saw the light of Agile while working as a senior project manager at the BBC,His UK Army background has prepared him for the vagaries and realities of IT projects.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10/11

10:45

Build Strong Teams through Trust & Alignment (David Hawks, Doc List)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
One of the key aspects of high performing Agile teams is trust. Trust is hard to define, and sometimes hard to earn and to give.
In this session, as a group we explore common team dysfunctions, such as lack of trust and alignment. You will learn a number of techniques for coaching teams such as journeylines, personal maps and constellation. After exploring and learning, you will conduct two exercises in groups: Moving Motivators, and a Team Values Exercise. These tools help teams work through conflict and change, and are valuable tools in your toolbox. These exercises also empower you to create and commit to an action plan that strengthens your team through trust and alignment.
Learning Outcomes:
  • List three or more common team dysfunctions
  • Identify five techniques for building team trust
  • Feel comfortable facilitating a “team trust and alignment” exercise
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Hawks

David Hawks

CEO, Agile Velocity
David Hawks is a Certified Scrum Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer who has played almost every role in product development: developer, architect, ScrumMaster, manager, Product Owner, and executive. He has a background of building highly productive Agile teams and a passion for helping others achieve similar success. David speaks frequently at conferences and local user meet-ups. As CEO of Agile Velocity, David brings his broad experience... Read More →
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

Senior Director, Training, Agile Velocity LLC
It's all about the people. Practices and methods and frameworks and... all of that is in service to enabling and supporting people in working effectively and working together.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Stop “Going Agile”! The three conversations you need to have before you start. (Heather Fleming)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
All too often, companies set out with the mission to “go agile” before truly understanding what that means. Business managers are quick to jump on the agile bandwagon, believing that “going agile” will magically make projects happen faster. Teams are getting certified in Scrum as if it’s a silver bullet that will suddenly make everyone more productive. Inevitably, cracks begin to show, and expectations are missed--leaving everyone involved questioning the value of “going agile” altogether.
There is a better way! The truth is that going agile will result in more productive teams and faster delivery of projects--but only if everyone can agree on the rules of the game.
Come hear Heather Fleming and Justin Riservato from Gilt discuss why gaining consensus on the principles of Agile is more important than implementing a process, and learn how having these three conversations can save you from an agile disaster:
  • “But when will you be done?” Why getting rid of the concept of deadlines is the most important (and most difficult) conversation when going agile.
  • “This is my top priority, but I can’t meet with you until next week.” What to do when your business partner can’t (or won’t) be a full member of the team.
  • “I just want to code. Why do I have to be in all these meetings?” Why implementing Scrum is not the first step to going agile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Setting up the conversations necessary to have before you "Go Agile"
  • Making sure all departments have the same understanding for what to expect.
  • Solving common problems when going agile or implementing scrum.
  • Setting up a winning experiment to rally people to your agile cause.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Heather Fleming

Heather Fleming

Senior Director, PMO, Gilt
As Senior Director of the Program Management Organization at Gilt, Heather Fleming oversees the execution of strategic technology initiatives across the companys 170-member tech team. Her chief aim: to challenge the status quo of project management best practices by continually experimenting with agile project management methodologies. Since joining Gilt in 2010, Heather has directed a wide variety of customer-facing, international, and back... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 8

10:45

Essential Skills for the Agile Developer (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It is time to get back to basics. People believe that since they know what the strategy, iterator, adapter or composite pattern are they believe they know design patterns. Unfortunately, this is akin to someone who knows 4 recipes thinking they are great cooks. Design patterns give insights into the proper way of design. The patterns, as solutions themselves, are only somewhat valuable. A major challenge in the Agile community today is people not manifesting what they know in their code. What you know in your head has no value if it doesn't manifest in your code.
Al Shalloway has been teaching design patterns for almost 2 decades. This talk is about getting the essence of the teachings of design patterns at a basic coding level. That is, by focusing on 6 basic practices:
1 Programming by intention
2 Separate Use From Construction
3 Consider tests before writing code
4 Encapsulation as a design technique
5 Avoiding redundancy that will come back to cost you
6 Refactor To The Open Closed
Our experience has shown that if you write code with these practices, your code will be of high quality even if you are not aware of the patterns you are likely implementing.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to write code in an extensible manner by attending to a handful of basic practices.
  • How the aforementioned practices will result in design patterns being used.
  • That writing code with high quality takes less time than writing code with low quality.
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 4/5

10:45

How DevOps Will Fix Government IT: Agility in a Low Trust Environment (Mark Schwartz)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We all know that agility requires trust, but the government is an extreme example of a low trust environment. We all know that agile approaches focus on maximizing business value delivered, but the definition of business value for a government is not at all clear. We all know that Lean approaches work to remove waste, but the government is designed around heavyweight processes that we know as red tape. Lean, agile IT seems like an impossible fit with a government environment.
Or - perhaps - the government is a perfect laboratory for pushing the boundaries of the agile approach and working on its most difficult issues.
I contend that every organization has a unique set of needs. The government's special needs result from its constant exposure to the cynical public eye, its complex oversight structure based on a system of checks and balances, and its foundations in a rule-based system to ensure accountability to the public. An IT project must meet these "business needs" in addition to any product-specific business needs - and the best way to meet business needs is to empower self-organizing teams to find the best way to do so. In other words, agile teams can self-organize to meet the deep needs of the bureaucracy, in addition to meeting any product-specific business needs.
At US Citizenship and Immigration Services, we have found that a DevOps framework, properly applied, can be a perfect way to meet the government's deeper needs. For example, scripted deployments can make it easier to change development contractors, which makes the government procurement system more open and more fair. By turning compliance requirements into automated tests, a DevOps team can make it clear to oversight bodies that it is fully compliant; by making metrics transparent across the entire delivery process, from development through production, DevOps can support the government's oversight processes. A DevOps-based security model can be made consistent with the government's new focus on Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation. DevOps can help us make government IT lean - while at the same time supporting the government's needs for oversight, transparency, and accountability to the public.
At USCIS we have taken an agile approach to our agile adoption - self organizing to meet the needs of the bureaucracy in a way that is lean and delivers value.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Applying agile approaches in a low-trust environment; using DevOps to meet needs of compliance and oversight; maximizing learning about deep organizational needs, not just product needs.



Speakers
avatar for Mark Schwartz

Mark Schwartz

CIO, USCIS


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 12

10:45

A Roadmap to your very own Yellow Brick Road (Matt Arena, Bhupendra Ubeja)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
PayPal competes as a market leader in a highly contested market place - the “prize” is big, startups are well funded and the industry is ripe for disruption. We realized we needed to increase responsiveness to market opportunities and competitive threats to be successful.
At scale, increased responsiveness requires that information critical for product planning and decision making remains complete, timely and accurate. For PayPal to continue to grow we needed an increased line of sight to producing and managing business value at scale.
Our response to this Strategic Imperative has been to develop and implement Continual Roadmap Planning at Scale (300+ teams) in an Agile enterprise.
In this interactive workshop, we'll practice developing a product roadmap and confront complex roadmaps at scale with dependencies. Participants will leave the workshop with a crisp list of steps to drive Continual Roadmap Planning and how they can act on their own strategic imperative to implement this in an Agile enterprise at scale.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - Appreciation of what’s involved in Roadmap Planning at Enterprise Scale
  • - Setup for looking at how this could apply in your situation
  • - Discover something about Agile Planning that you didn’t know
Attachments:

Speakers
MA

Matt Arena

Senior Transformation Engagement Lead, PayPal, Inc.
Matt is currently an Enterprise Transformation Architect within PayPals Agile Transformation Group. He has been leading process transformation efforts for over 15 years, currently leading efforts at PayPal across the Enterprise Agile space including Roadmap Planning, Release Planning and Defect Management. Matt comes from a deep Supply Chain and IT background having had Director level roles at Hewlett Packard and Genentech. He is a certified... Read More →
BU

Bhupendra Ubeja

Director, Enterprise Transformation, Planning & Portfolio Management, PayPal Inc.
Bhupendra Ubeja is Director, Enterprise Transformation at PayPal. He is currently responsible for leading Transformation to Agile at Scale, and also leads Enterprise Planning & Portfolio management for PayPal. | | Bhupendra joined PayPal in August 2008 and since have led various Change management, Product / Program management, Strategic planning, operations at scale and delivery execution roles. He led program & portfolio management... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

10:45

Using a Design thinking process to approach a shift to Agile culture (Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Abstract:
Design Thinking refers to the methods and processes to investigate
complex problems in highly uncertain systems. This workshop is about
how to use this iterative process of observation, ideation and
implementation to better understand organisation's culture and create
reasons for people in the organisation to embrace Agile.
Summary:
This workshop is about how to use a design thinking process an
techniques to better understand organisation's culture and minimize
resistance to change in the creation of an Agile culture. The strategy
is to combine empathy for the context, creativity in the generation of
insights and solutions, and rationality to analyze and fit solutions
to the context. This solutions are aimed to create reasons for people
in the organisation to embrace Agile.
Description:
Design Thinking refers to the methods and processes to investigate
complex problems in highly uncertain systems, acquiring information,
analysing knowledge, and positing solutions. This workshop is about
the usage of this process to better understand organisation's culture
and minimise resistance to change in the creation of an Agile culture.
The strategy is to combine empathy for the context, creativity in the
generation of insights and solutions, and rationality to analyse and
fit solutions to the context. This solutions are aimed to create
reasons for people in the organisation to embrace Agile.
This iterative process of observation, ideation and implementation can
be integrated within your retrospectives and also applied outside IT
to create a continuous improvement engine for organisational culture
in organisations.
Mechanics:
10-15 minutes introduction
15-20 minutes for inspiration/observation techniques
(probably customer modelling & empathy map)
15-20 minutes for ideation techniques
(probably think in reverse & ideal world)
15-20 minutes for implementation techniques
(probably business model canvas & elevator pitch)
5-15 minutes closure

Learning Outcomes:
  • Deeper understanding of cultural change in organisations
  • Design thinking process
  • Design thinking inspiration/observation techniques
  • Design thinking ideation techniques
  • Design thinking implementation techniques



Speakers
avatar for Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez

Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez

Agile Coach, Agilar
Angel is a very energetic CEC (Certified Enterprise Coach by the Scrum Alliance) who truly enjoy challenges. Making Agile work in complex environments is his specialty and passion. Currently he’s part of Agilar, one of the leading Agile coaching firms in Europe and Latin America. As a trainer, coach, and mentor, he supported several multinational organizations in their Agile journeys. | During his 17+ years of experience in IT Angel has... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 1/2/3

10:45

Agile Planning and Estimating Techniques in a Federal World (Brandon Raines, Edric Spruill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The government is seeing the merit of using agile practices to develop software. However, the fallacy that you can’t estimate projects using agile in the government still exist. The result is that many projects that want to use Agile begin in a very waterfall way developing the initial plan and are forced to stick to that plan throughout the project despite using sprints throughout the ‘development phase’. Many falsely believe they are stuck in the tradition of estimating everything in the beginning. During this presentation, through lecture and based upon real experiences, we will demonstrate techniques for developing a project plan and estimating techniques to satisfy the typical government compliance requirements using Agile practices and principles. Hear from a Government Division Manager who implemented these techniques within his Division. In essence, we will together learn how to build the bridge from the traditional government practices to a brave new world where we can plan, estimate and still inject agility.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the different levels of planning and how each level serves its purpose
  • Demonstrate estimating techniques at each level of planning
  • Demonstrate Agile planning and estimating techniques to answer typical government control gates and milestones without losing agility
  • Demonstrate techniques to track your estimates
  • What to track? What not to track?
  • Demonstrate techniques to track your budget against the value being incrementally delivered
Attachments:

Speakers
BR

Brandon Raines

Shokunin
Over a career spanning 15+ years, Brandon has been a developer, tester, project manager, architect, certfied scrum master, certified scrum practitioner and agile coach. Mr. Raines has helped teams mainly in the federal government as an Certified Scrum Coach(CSC) in their transition to Agile ranging in size from 10 people to 150. In addition, Brandon has been instrumental in the acceptance, transition and training for enterprises. Mr. Raines was... Read More →
ES

Edric Spruill

Dr., US Government
Dr. Spruill has taught at several colleges and universities over the last several years to include Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Salem International University as well as other institutions. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he is a retired United States Army First Sergeant and currently works full time for the Federal Government as a Division Manager. He is also a Speaker/Coach, real estate investor, and author. Dr. Spruill... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

10:45

Waterfall comfort in an agile world: Give Federal Execs the answers they 'used to get' (John Hughes)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Your effective agile program can go downhill fast even in the most progressive Federal organization if executive leadership begins to think that the answers they used to get in the "Waterfall world" are no longer available to them in an agile world. Federal Executives have elevated reporting responsibilities and need to answer to the public, sometimes even to Congress itself, therefore pressures are high for proper communication flow. Don’t let your program get to the point where “agile just doesn’t work for us.”
Requirements such as the OMB Exhibit 300 which updates the Federal IT Dashboard and Earned Value Management which is required for larger IT efforts put pressure on Federal executives. They understood how to request the information they needed before going agile, and their teams knew how to get it to them. Agile teams typically no longer create fully resourced project schedules, Gantt charts, and comprehensive requirements documents. Leadership gets frustrated when they can’t get a “straight answer” to questions they are used to having answered such as “what is the project schedule’s critical path showing,” or “are we staffed properly to complete all the remaining requirements by the end of the contract.”
The answers are still there and the information is still available but the tools and methods by which we produce this information are now different. We need to be able to translate the questions being asked and help Federal executives understand how to better ask the questions to get what they are really looking for. Learn how to extract the necessary information from our agile toolset (Roadmap and Backlog, Velocity, Burndowns, User Stories, etc.) to give our Federal executives what they need to be successful meeting the myriad requirements applied to Federal IT programs.
The goal for this session is to provide you the tools you need to continue giving your Federal executives what they need to manage and report on their programs effectively. You will gain insight into what is required of Federal IT programs and therefore what is really being asked, and to help your leadership better ask the questions “in an agile way” so that you may deliver impactful answers derived from our agile tools. You will understand how our agile tools are used and combined to provide the same answers the "Waterfall tools" used to provide Federal organizations. You will go back able to save your agile project from potential doom in the hands of executives under pressure to report against practices they no longer understand.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The goal for this session is to provide you the tools you need to continue to give your Federal Executives what they need to manage and report on their programs effectively. You will gain insight into what is required of Federal IT programs and therefore what is really being asked, and to help your leadership better ask the questions “in an agile way” so that you may deliver impactful answers derived from our agile toolset. You will understand how our agile tools are used and combined to provide the same answers the "Waterfall tools" used to provide Federal organizations.
  • Besides putting you in your customer or leader's shoes for a moment, this session will also strengthen your knowledge of our agile toolset, metrics, and practices as well as how they tie together to give essential program information in the Federal space.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Hughes

John Hughes

Strategist, Blackstone Technology Group
John Hughes is an Agile Coach with Blackstone Technology Group's Federal Practice. He has developed and delivered solutions in the Federal IT space for over 17 years.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 3

10:45

Territories, Not Hierarchies - Pressfield's War of Art as a Frame for Modern Leadership (Gary Pedretti)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Steven Pressfield's The War of Art: Winning the Inner Creative Battle is well-known to artists, especially authors struggling with writer's block. It's a bedrock inspirational tome, focused on the artist finding his or her true self, breaking through resistance, and contributing his or her unique gifts to the larger whole of society.
If what we do when we create software isn't engineering, isn't factory work, and isn't science - aren't we saying it's creative work? Art? Craft? We shouldn't be surprised that Pressfield's classic for artists chasing the muse has a lot to teach us in the realms of modern business and software.
In this presentation, we'll focus on an important aspect of the book - the artist's orientation - of which Pressfield provides two possibilities, hierarchical or territorial. We'll examine how this relates to modern leadership, effectively and appropriately breaking down organizational hierarchies, product vision, intrinsic motivation, and craftsmanship.
Be prepared for a unique, artistic view of our industry!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding modern business and software as creative, artistic endeavors
  • Using an artist's mindset to tackle common leadership issues
  • Using connections between The War of Art and modern leadership as effective metaphors for organizational change and learning
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gary Pedretti

Gary Pedretti

Owner, Sodoto Solutions
I am an agile practitioner, Scrum trainer, application architect, and software craftsman. With over sixteen years of experience, I help companies achieve their goals in delivering business value through software. In 2006, I took a class on Scrum with Ken Schwaber. Since then I have worked to evangelize Scrum and other agile frameworks. I see these ideas as a natural outgrowth of the lessons learned in the software industry, including lessons I... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 6/7

10:45

Your Assignment: Use Agile to Teach Yourself Agile (Richard Kasperowski)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Want your students to really learn Agile? Have them teach it back to themselves. Here’s their assignment:
//"Design, implement, and deliver courseware that teaches you everything you need to know about Agile."//
Guide your students one step at a time through the complete Agile product development lifespan, from team formation all the through product delivery and team retrospective. Your students leave your class with:
  • a demonstrated high level of Agile proficiency—they delivered an actual product,
  • high internalized knowledge of Agile—they taught the subject matter to their teammates, and
  • an important artifact—a student-specific guide to everything they need to know about Agile

Learning Outcomes:
  • Teaching is the best way to learn. Here’s a proven approach for teaching your team or your students Agile at the highest level of the pedagogy scale, a means for them to obtain practical knowledge of Agile (or any complex skill) that endures after the training sessions ends.
  • In this session, you’ll learn:
  • * Pedagogy traditions, both new and old, that inspire innovation in pedagogy, including martial arts training, university foreign language acquisition, language hunting, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and Core Protocols BootCamp
  • * Effective pedagogy: transitioning skills from short term memory to long term embodiment
  • * A new three-level model for pedagogy
  • * How to teach Agile at the highest level of the pedagogy scale: a repeatable method for the learners to teach it to themselves
  • * How to create an environment in which learners rapidly advance from pedagogy level 1 to level 3



Speakers
avatar for Richard Kasperowski

Richard Kasperowski

Cofounder, Greatness Guild
Richard Kasperowski is a cofounder of the Greatness Guild, a signatory of the Manifesto for Greatness, and the author of The Core Protocols: A Guide to Greatness. He leads clients in building great teams that get great results, using the Core Protocols, Agile, and Open Space Technology. Richard teaches the class Agile Software Development at Harvard University. Follow him on Twitter at @rkasper, read more about him at www.kasperowski.com, and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

10:45

Kicking off an Agile Product, Team and Culture (Darren Hoevel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As Agile sweeps through the industry at amazing speed, organization struggle how to “transform” their culture and adapt their project execution in their new enterprise. Meanwhile, the business and IT struggle to understand what is expected from them as they enter new projects under the “Agile template”... In this session we will discuss how “setting the stage” for an Agile product, team and organization will help to level set expectations and increase the probability of business value delivery by everyone involved. We will leverage standard project documentation, Agile best practices and facilitation games to emulate an Agile product kick off. Our goal for this session will be to provide the group with an Agile kick off “template” that will increase team buy in and minimize team hurdles along your journey to happy customers. DISCLAIMER: No magic fairy dust will be provided... just a compilation of tools for you to utilize as you feel fit.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Provide a proven, scalable framework for Organizations and Agilist to "Kickoff" their Agile projects and teams.
  • • Driving executive engagement, Team buy in, clear customer expectations, and product vision.
  • • Provide a template the audience can scale up or down in their organization for their next Agile kickoff!



Speakers
avatar for Darren Hoevel

Darren Hoevel

Agile Junkie, Cultural Renovator, Customer Ambassador, Pliant Solutions
Darren Hoevel is a passionate Agile realist, organizational change advocate, corporate cultural renovator, customer ambassador and founder of Pliant Solutions. He is driven by transforming organizations into self-managing, self-organizing teams with high morale. Darren prides himself on being not just a coach but a leader, helping team members achieve success on an individual level through a collaborative environment which, in turn, contributes... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 5/6

10:45

Research Short Papers (10 Minute Presentations) (Rafael Prikladnicki)
Abstract:
Join us for 6 short Research presentations:
  • Symbolic Innovation in Agile Transformation - Doug Rose
  • The Impact of Human Factors on Agile Projects - Aline Chagas, Melquizedequi Santos, Célio Santana, Alexandre Vasconcelos
  • Is Agile Portfolio Management Following the Principles of Large-Scale Agile? - Maarit Laanti, Mirette Kangas
  • Development of Complex Software with Agile Method - Alan Braz, Cec´ılia M. F. Rubira, Marco Vieira
  • Gap Analysis Between State of Practice & State of Art Practices in Agile Software Development - Abdul Rauf, Mohammed AlGhafees
  • A Lean Design Methodology for Business Models and Its Application to IoT Business Model Development - Masahiro ide, Yukio Amagai, Mikio Aoyama, Yasuhiro Kikushima
Learning Outcomes:
  • .



Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Open Jam

10:45

Stalwarts: Jim Benson (Jim Benson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Jim Benson
A pioneer in applying Lean and Kanban to knowledge work, and an internationally recognized speaker and author, Jim Benson is CEO of the collaborative management consultancy Modus Cooperandi and founding partner of Modus Institute. He is a fellow in the Lean Systems Society and recipient of the Brickell Key Award for Excellence in Lean Thinking. He is the creator of Personal Kanban and co-author of Personal Kanban: Mapping Work | Navigating Life, winner of the Shingo Research and Publication Award. His other books include Why Plans Fail, Why Limit WIP, and Beyond Agile.
What is a Stalwarts session?
Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.
Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.




Learning Outcomes:


  • .




Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 2

10:45

Agile Testing in the Enterprise (Janet Gregory)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When agile development first gained popularity, agile meant collocated teams, including testers, programmers, analysts, and customers who were expected to perform many functions. As agile methods have spread and expanded, large organizations and those with globally-distributed teams are facing challenges with their testing in their agile deployment. One example is dependencies between teams mean that a single team cannot necessarily have complete control over testing a feature. Economies of scale for testing is something that many organizations have not considered; think about what testing belongs at the team level, and what testing may go beyond.
Having worked with many such teams, Janet Gregory has observed ways that testing in agile teams can still help deliver a high-quality software product. Whether your agile team is part of an enterprise solution, or part of a distributed team is scattered across time zones with individuals working remotely from home, or is part of an offshore outsourced project, you’ll take away methods and tools to help develop open communication, deal with cultural differences both within an organization and across continents specifically related to testing activities.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • Concrete ideas of how to tackle some of the testing issues that large teams and organizations face.
  • • Suggestions on how to problem solve your specific testing issue that your team faces
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Janet Gregory

Janet Gregory

Agile Coach, DragonFire Inc.
An agile testing coach and practitioner, Janet Gregory (@janetgregoryca) is the co-author of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams, More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team, and a contributor to 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know. Janet specializes in showing agile teams how testers can add value in areas beyond critiquing the product for example, guiding development with business-facing tests. For the... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac D

11:30

Rebooting Agile @ GE Transportation (Jesse Fewell, Julie Wenzel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
What do you do when your Agile journey isn't going where you'd hoped? GE Transportation had been on a multi-year Agile journey, but recently challenged itself with hard questions: Are we getting what we want? What if we turned everything upside down? What if we leverage our maintenance burden to increase innovation? What if labor capitalization increased our transparency? What if going offshore actually increased our collaboration? Come hear the honest story of the largest builder of railroad equipment leverage impediments into improvements.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why you might reboot an Agile program
  • Understand ideas for generating executive buy-in BEFORE making changes
  • Understand ideas for overcoming both known impediments and unexpected surprises
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Fewell

Jesse Fewell

Agile Coach & Trainer, JesseFewell.com
Jesse Fewell is a writer, coach, and trainer in the world of management and innovation. From Minneapolis to Malaysia, he's helped startups and conglomerates alike catapult to breakthrough results. His adventures are written down in "Can You Hear Me Now", his handbook for remote teams. A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, he helped bring agile methods to PMPs around the world by co-creating the PMI-ACP agile certification, and co-authoring... Read More →
JW

Julie Wenzel

IT Program Manager, General Electric Transportation
I am a recent graduation of GE's prestigious Information Technology Leadership Program (ITLP) where I successfully completed four six-month rotational assignments in data modeling with SAS solutions, supply chain, finance enterprise standards, and in global signaling. I am a result driven, energetic and adaptable IT Project Manager with a proven execution ability in fast paced environments with an end user focus.



Wednesday August 5, 2015 11:30 - 12:00
Potomac 4

14:00

Lessons learned from testing a mission critical and complex system (Melanie Hopwood)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
In this Agile software development environment, are you working on legacy software that has an impact on our nation's security? Or are you asking yourself how can I do test driven development with such a huge legacy code base? Would it take you forever and a day to test everything in your system? We have felt these pains and have some suggestions on how to utilize user data, metrics and risk planning to resolve these hard questions.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Ideas on how to automate test scenarios that involve sensors
  • How to create test scenarios to ensure performance of an aging code base
  • How to maximize the value from exploratory testing of a complex system
  • How to best integrate live data into automated testing for complex scenarios
  • How to establish criteria to gain consensus of an appropriate level of testing on a complex system
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Melanie Hopwood

Melanie Hopwood

QA Advocate, Asynchrony
3 years experience working with an experienced Agile team developing software for support of first responders


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Potomac 4

14:00

The Prevalence of UX Design in Agile Development Processes in Industry (Tina Oevad)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The gap between how the academic world develops usability and user experience (UX) methods, and how the industry employs these methods is perceived as both broad and deep. But is that the real picture – and has there been a change in how companies work within these fields over the past two years? By conducting interviews with eight companies, this paper tries to answer these two questions. The companies were initially interviewed in 2013 and by follow-up interviews in 2015 the paper draws a picture of how the companies work with UX and usability in an agile development environment. We identify the challenges they are facing and if, and how the work progresses. We found that the UX maturity during these two years had changed significantly. This was revealed by the fact that almost all of the companies in 2015 had implemented or were in the process of developing a UX strategy together with more formalized UX processes. They also allocated more resources to conduct UX and usability work than earlier. We found that all of the companies made use of low-fi prototyping, followed by usability testing, workshops, personas, expert evaluations, user or customer journeys, customer visits and user task analyses. Almost all the companies carried out development using the Scrum framework. All of the companies were interested in the idea of agile UX, and found the idea of using the developers as a UX resource interesting. This, together with an idea of modifying existing usability methods to be used in an agile, industrial setting could be a solution to bridge the gap between academia and the industry.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
National Harbor 8

14:00

Introduction to Agile Helpers and Guides: Working with Coaches and Consultants (Ray Arell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Over the past 8 years, I have been working to transform my company of ~100K people to an Agile development culture. At many times this has been a daunting and complex task. One key lesson that I have learned is that a “go it alone” strategy puts your adoption and transformation at greater risk of moving too slow or even failing completely. In this talk we will explore when is the right time to use consultants and freelance coaches to accelerate your work. We will also explore the key transformation strategies to get the highest value from this investment, ways to grow your own internal capability, how to transfer know-how across your organization, and key considerations and learnings to help you successfully apply external experience.

Learning Outcomes:


  • Adoption scenarios and reasons to use/not use coaches and consultants

  • Know-how management and distribution

  • Identifying the Snake Oil Salesperson





Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

14:00

Great Coaching Conversations Workshop (Martin Alaimo, Olaf Lewitz)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As a ScrumMaster, Team Facilitator, Agile Coach or Enterprise Agile Coach you’ll be assisting people, either on the team, executive or individual level, to identify and remove the different impediments that prevent them from achieving their goals. Facilitating the impediments removal is not the same as removing the impediments by your own. The latter might be easier at first, but the former is the one that will help people improve their skills and self-organizing abilities.
In this workshop we’ll be going through a series of stages and powerful questions that can help you have great coaching conversations with the individuals or teams in order to facilitate those impediments removal and, at the same time, improve their abilities and skills.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to identify the 4 main areas of a coaching conversation design:
  • 1) goal setting,
  • 2) impediments identification,
  • 3) facilitators discovery and
  • 4) action plan design.
  • Each of the main areas have different sub-areas and each of them also have different powerful questions that will help a coach assist their coachee in the process of self-discovery.
  • You will learn something in this session that you can put to use next Monday: You will be able to have great coaching conversations with your coachees and the members of the teams that you facilitate.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martin Alaimo

Martin Alaimo

Agile Coach & Trainer, Founder, Kleer
I work as Organizational Coach and professional trainer. As a Certified Scrum Coach (CSC) and Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), my main area of intervention is team work under a collaborative and relational environment within the scope of technological products development. My main concern today is about helping other areas, beyond the technology one, to perceive and capitalize the benefits of this new working proposal, emphasising interpersonal... Read More →
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10/11

14:00

Agile Jesters, Magicians, and Clowns: Using the unexpected to move mountains and your team (Adam Weisbart)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Scrum is excellent at helping surface team and organizational dysfunction, but dealing with dysfunction can be uncomfortable. As an agilist, how do you help your team work through these newly voiced challenges?
Court jesters have a long history of helping give voice to uncomfortable truths, often speaking words that would have others killed. In the 1300's when the French fleet was destroyed by the English at the Battle of Sluys, the French king's jester told him that the English sailors "don't even have the guts to jump into the water like our brave French". This session will help you become an agile jester - speaking difficult truths through humor.
During this workshop you'll get hands-on experience using practical tools drawn from improvisational comedy, the art of magic, and clowning. Every agilist should have these tools in their bag of tricks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover improvisational comedy techniques and games to help elevate the mood of your team, discover hidden strengths, and find solutions to challenges your team is facing
  • Learn new retrospective techniques that will give your team an enjoyable, fulfilling, and powerful way to solve their current challenges
  • Experience how sudden juxtapositions, like those found in jokes, can help your team discover solutions to problems that seemed unsolvable



Speakers
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam is a passionate Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Coach based in San Francisco. He has created several training modules including Build Your Own Scrum which is used by trainers around the world to teach Scrum from the back of the room. He's the creator of the viral video "Sh*t Bad Scrum Masters Say", the baker of Retrospective Cookies, and author of the upcoming book Agile Antipatterns: The Scrum Master's Guide to Traps, Tripwires... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 3

14:00

The Agile BA: For an Agile team...you complete me! (Robert Woods)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Business Analysts assigned to assist Agile teams or working directly on an Agile team may find themselves either torn in many directions or struggling to see where they fit in. Business Analysts considering Agile as professional growth may be hesitant due to rumors they've heard about struggles for Agile BA’s and the nightmares of going from a strict Waterfall environment to an Agile one. Robert Woods from MATRIX will help attendees tackle head on some of the rumors and myths surrounding the Agile BA and very common struggles a Business Analyst may encounter with Agile teams. Attendees will see how the Business Analyst role is actually critical to the Agile team's overall success. We will answer questions such as:
• What is the role for an Agile BA?
• How can I help my Agile team with compliance and documentation needs?
• Why is my Waterfall experience not a bad thing?
• How will Agile improve my overall collaboration on business requirements?
• How does my job as an Agile BA create real business value?
• Where are my opportunities for professional growth on an Agile team?
Attendees will walk away with practical ways they can become active leaders for their teams, achieve professional growth and help bridge the Business and IT Alignment gap so many organizations strive for!
Learning Outcomes:
  • • The critical role an Agile BA brings to their team and organization
  • • Dispelling rumors around Agile documentation
  • • How a BA with Waterfall experience brings value to an Agile team
  • • How Agile has helped BA's improve how they elicit requirements and features
  • • How successful Agile Business Analysts have created professional improvement and growth opportunities for themselves.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Robert Woods

Robert Woods

Agile Coach & Delivery Manager, MATRIX Resources
Robert Woods serves as an Agile Coach and Delivery Manager at MATRIX. He has been in IT for over 18 years serving in such roles as Sr. Systems and Networking Engineer, Project Manager, Program Manager, and Agile Coach. Robert has spent years working with organizations on collaborative lean development, Agile testing techniques, requirements analysis, project envisioning, relationship management, Agile within ITSM and Agile leadership.Robert has... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 5/6

14:00

From Zero to Continuous Validated Learning: Lean Startup on PaaS (Chris Sterling)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
This session will take us on a journey from idea to "validated learning”, implementing an idea and measuring for its expected effect on behavior. Cloud computing, Agile software development, and Lean Startup have all contributed to lowering the cost of learning and accelerating time to market for businesses. Platform as a Service (PaaS) is further accelerating the validated learning cycles in application development to increase successful business outcomes. We will show how to use Cloud Foundry as a PaaS and a Lean Startup approach to take us from zero to a valuable platform that helps us inspect and adapt our business based on validated learning.
  • Using Lean Canvas to identify our first experiment
  • Developing a Landing Page MVP application to run the first experiment
  • Deploying to Cloud Foundry, a Platform as a Service (PaaS), for executing the experiment
  • Measure the results of the experiment
  • Reviewing the Lean Canvas to decide what we need to learn next
  • Use a Blue/Green Deployment approach for updating our application

Learning Outcomes:
  • After this session, participants will take away an approach for validating their own business ideas through fast, focused learning cycles. Software developers will also take away tools and techniques for enabling fast feedback using Cloud Foundry as a PaaS.



Speakers
avatar for Chris Sterling

Chris Sterling

Product Owner - AppFog, CenturyLink Cloud
Chris Sterling is a Product Owner for AppFog, a public platform to deploy cloud native applications, at CenturyLink Cloud. Chris has an extensive technology, process, and consulting background and brings his experience and deep passion for software development into his daily work. Chris published the book Managing Software Debt: Building for Inevitable Change with Addison-Wesley in 2010 to provide a framework for teams and organizations to assess... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

14:00

Hands-on: Let's save some Legacy Code (Arlo Belshee, Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Like everyone else, you have a large product that is hard to work with. We're going to change that in 75 minutes. Together we will save some gnarly legacy code (one thousand-line function). We will start with something hard to read, untested, and possibly buggy. We will finish with code that is stupidly easy to modify. You'll learn 6 trivial techniques that you can apply over and over to fix 95% of the messiest code you have. You can take home this exercise to help the rest of your team learn these techniques. You'll also learn how your team can teach itself a bunch more techniques to handle the other 5%.
We are going to save some legacy code. In 75 minutes. While adding features. We will mob program; you will save this legacy code. We won't introduce any bugs along the way. We will spend the time that you would normally use reading code to instead make it readable. You can apply these techniques and reduce the cost of coding within 48 hours of getting home.
We have done this exercise with dozens of teams. They code differently now. Changing existing code is actually safer and cheaper than writing new code. Their designs get a little better each day. This session will improve your code and show you what skills to learn to gain further improvements.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Know the 6 refactorings required for reading code by refactoring it.
  • Differentiate between refactoring and micro-rewrites (code editing), and choose each where appropriate.
  • Have fluency in the key refactorings with one tool set and know how to spread that fluency to other tools and to broaden the skills within that tool set.
  • Able to start successfully saving legacy code without making major investments, even with no tests.
  • See an obvious path for continuing to learn design and refactoring skills - know where and how to get feedback and can create own curriculum for next 1.5-3 years of improvements.



Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Sr. Program Mgr, Microsoft
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. | | More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant you will ever need to hire. After 6 months, you should be able to adapt your culture, practices, and company structures to meet novel challenges, each... Read More →
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight author.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

The ABCDs of Database Development: Always Be Continuously Delivering (Elizabeth Ayer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Imagine the freedom you would have to develop great software if making changes to the database were both faster and safer. Hard to picture? Perhaps not - database changes are not so different from code, except for one essential difference: the data.
This session will explore the tension between the speed imperative of Agile and the safety requirements of database administration. Despite years of practices built around assumptions to the contrary, we will see how both needs are better satisfied when the two sides join forces. Faster and more reliable deployments can be achieved through a combination process change, education, and technology.
Together we'll walk a happy path through the technologies needed to automate a database delivery process. With actual customer case studies, we will look at steps to transformation, drawing out the common methods from their unique situations. You will come out with an understanding how to customize practices and toolsets, building a database delivery pipeline best suited to your environment. The result will accelerate your own database delivery, while protecting your organization's most valuable asset: its data.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand process and technology requirements to automate your release pipeline step-by-step.
  • Learn about the organizational changes necessary to support process modifications.
  • Appreciate why these changes are necessary to match modern development and deployment methodologies.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Ayer

Elizabeth Ayer

Product Manager, Redgate
In a past life, Elizabeth Ayer was a software developer at a large enterprise software organisation. In a sustained backlash against this, she has since focused her energy on creating the right environment for collaboration and innovation at all levels. Elizabeth is now a product manager with Redgate Software, a company with 15 years' history in Database Lifecycle Management solutions. She's worked with teams building everything from Open... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 12

14:00

Entangled: Solving the Hairy Problem of Team Dependencies (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
When portfolio and program managers undertake quarterly (or annual) feature and portfolio planning, understanding team dependencies is made necessary to identify constraints and avoid overburdening one team. Complexity quickly grows beyond intuition after two or three team dependencies are identified, rendering current forecasting techniques unsatisfactory. This session will discuss the inadequacies of current tools and frameworks used to manage the dependency planning problem, and introduce the choices you have for reducing the complexity and new planning techniques that untangle dependencies into a doable plan.
At the end of the session, attendees will have a new understanding of the complexity team dependencies add to planning, and have a set of strategies and techniques to predictably manage products built in high team-dependency organizations. This session looks at example dependency graphs and graphical matrix techniques that are quick to build and give clear risk insight.
It often shocks organizations to learn mathematically that each team dependency HALVES the chances of an on-time completion of component or delivery. With two dependencies, there is a 1 in 4 chance of no delay; with three dependencies, there is a chance of 1 in 8 delivering on-time. One large legacy application the author worked with had seven dependencies from a core library to a user interface – that is a 1 in 128 chance no team will be delayed (127 times more likely to experience one or more delays). Planning clearly needs to consider how dependencies might impact each teams ability to integrate and build.
It is not as dire as it sounds, not every team suffers the same chance of delay. We look at how to analyze historical examples of delayed work to identify types of features that will encounter dependency delays in the future. Building a map (linked graph) and matrix visualizations of team dependencies gives a basis for examining this historical likelihood of delay and planning team organization structures or staffing plans that compensate. It is possible to predictibly plan in high dependency environments, its just too hard to do in ad-hoc ways.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the impact of multiple team dependencies on planning and scheduling predictability
  • Introduce ways to identify and visualize dependencies for planning
  • Understanding current strengths and weaknesses of dependency management approaches
  • New strategies for minimizing the impact of dependencies and planning cross team capacity
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology has always been a passion for Troy. After cutting his teeth on early 8-bit personal computers, Troy moved into electronic engineering, which later led to positions... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

14:00

The Agile Value Chain — Embracing Agile Throughout the Enterprise (Ken Rubin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you work in an organization that expects development to be agile but doesn’t see any advantage of changing the way the rest of the organization operates? Do your colleagues in sales, marketing, finance, legal, HR, governance, etc., unintentionally make your job more difficult just by doing things they way they’ve always done them? Do you try to explain that agile requires changes across the organization, only to hear, “But agile is all about development, right?”
If so, I bet you’ve heard all the same excuses I have. Sales can’t operate in an agile-like way because legal demands they write fixed-priced, fixed-scope, fixed-date contracts. Finance would love to be more agile, but budget realities require that you submit a spending plan detailing where every penny will be spent a year or more ahead of time—and yes, you will be held accountable to that. Senior management would love to help limit the number of projects, but that would mean saying no to one or more stakeholders, which just isn’t politically feasible. So for now, they’d like to have all the teams show a little progress (however small) on every project.
It is a miracle that we can do any kind of reasonable agile development in this environment! The reality is that if we want to be successful with agile, I mean truly reap the benefits of what we expect to get from agility, then we need to embrace agile throughout the full value chain. In other words, the non-development parts of the organization have to embrace agile and align their efforts with those of development.
This presentation presents various strategies for aligning groups like sales, marketing, legal, finance, HR, and senior management with core agile principles. The goal is to create an agile organization, instead of one that all but guarantees a continuous stream of impediments that interfere with team-level agility and sub-optimize delivered value.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what is an agile value chain and why is it important to reaping the benefits of agility
  • Understand reasons why core agile principles are not being adopted through the value chain
  • Learn approaches to align sales, marketing, legal, and HR with agile development efforts
  • Learn how to include portfolio-level planning in the agile value chain
  • Understand the importance of including partners in the value chain and how we can do it
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac D

14:00

Road to No Management (Pawel Brodzinski)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We often connect leadership with management. It is a common misconception. On one level – self-organizing teams – we find it rather easy to accept that these are in fact independent concepts. We want the whole team to show leadership and take responsibility for their commitments within the constraints defined by a project, a hierarchy and a method. The same pattern, however, can go way further than that.
What would happen if we adopted the same paradigm when designing the whole organization, not just a team?
The No Management theme is used to label different approaches that refuse to use traditional management paradigms. While the stories differ one of the common parts is emergence of leadership across organizations on all levels. At the same time I don’t consider No Management a destination. It’s more of a journey and as such it can be used to drive leadership in all sorts of organizations.
I will share the story of Lunar Logic, where we evolved from a traditional organization to pretty radical approach where almost everyone is a leader and there’s no formal hierarchy. Some of the ideas are easily applicable on a team level, some require more positional power. All of them are inspiring.
It’s not just a story though. I will cover elements of systems thinking, organizational culture, anthropology and psychology that are building blocks that enable such stories to happen in a repeatable manner. Do you want to be a part of one? Join me at this session.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learning the idea of No Management organizations and why they perform so well
  • Understanding building blocks for creating an environment where leadership emerges across all the ranks
  • Learning ideas that enable emergent leadership
  • Challenging traditional management paradigms
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Pawel Brodzinski

Pawel Brodzinski

Chief Cook and Bottle-Washer, Lunar Logic
Pawel Brodzinski is a leader, a team builder and a change agent, but most of all he is an always experimenting practitioner trying to make his teams work better (and learn in the process).He is an active member of global Lean Kanban community. He led the first Kanban implementation in software industry in Poland.Pawel leads Lunar Logic (http://lunarlogic.io), an off-shore web software shop, where he practices of what he preaches. He blogs sharing... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 1/2/3

14:00

Introducing getKanban v2.0: Lean Principles for Experiential Learners (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Who loves sitting in a training room being lectured about agile? Yeah, me neither.
There are lots of agile games, where experiential learners can get hands-on and explore the principles of Lean and agile at their own pace. What makes an agile game great? The right mix of accurate—staying true to the principles and practices it teaches—and engaging—giving students a reason to care about the outcome so they'll play (and learn) from the heart!
In this session, we'll learn about one specific tried-and-tested great agile game. Using the open-source getKanban Version 2.0, we'll step through its game mechanics and review, in some detail, how each design decision helps to illustrate the fundamentals of Kanban. Along the way, we'll review a few key Lean principles and show how the game enlivens those lessons. When we're finished, you'll be ready to download the free getKanban game kit and play by yourself, or with your team, or even run your own big getKanban session with multiple play teams!
This session covers the basics of getKanban Version 2.0 for new players, plus a review of limiting WIP, creating a pull system, and working in cross-functional teams. Experienced Kanban trainers and coaches can also learn some new techniques for facilitating the game.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of learning styles when teaching agile
  • Recognize the ways getKanban illustrates real-world Kanban mechanics
  • Appreciate how limiting WIP is used in Kanban to create a pull system, and understand how T-shaped individuals help work flow
  • Learn how to facilitate a session of getKanban, including for large groups of multiple play teams



Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

CTO, Peak Medical Technologies
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight, and mentored former COBOL devs into true-believing unit-testing XP evangelists, all of which leads her to believe that anything is possible. She is not sorry for... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

14:00

Taming the Agile Release Planning Beast (Linda Cook, Doug Depew)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Trying to figure out Agile Release Planning? We've done it and we've done it well. Twelve teams - done! Twenty teams - done! Forty teams - done! If your organization needs to tackle the enterprise release planning beast, you should attend this session. Whether you are struggling with planning a large Agile release planning event or simply trying to figure out how to improve your current Agile release planning events, this session will provide nuggets of learning from planning teams with hundreds of people spread around the globe. Many organizations have tried to conduct enterprise Agile release planning and gave up because they could not overcome some of the basic obstacles like who to invite, where to hold the event, and how to keep everyone engaged.
If you are trying to figure out how to coordinate two teams or dozens of teams, this session will provide insights into what works and what doesn't. You will gain experience by practicing actual Agile release planning exercises to help you prepare for your organizations next Agile RP event. The learning experience starts with a presentation on the key steps to consider as you launch a large Agile program.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn how to plan, execute, and iterate through Agile release planning for 2 - 50 teams. Learning outcomes include how to:
  • » Start at scale
  • » Plan the 1st Agile release planning event
  • » Pre-plan activities
  • » Budget
  • » Prepare the Release Backlog » Coordinate logistics
  • » Keep participants engaged
  • » Facilitate and execute Iterate using retrospective outcomes
  • » Map dependencies across multiple teams
  • » Slot stories across the release



Speakers
avatar for Linda Cook

Linda Cook

Chief Learning Officer, Project Cooks, LLC
Early in 2015, I made the decision to re-launch my consulting practice to help organizations find their way to agility. My small team is made up of collaborators, employees and business partners aimed at delivering the best training, coaching and mentoring. All our work is based in agile values and principles without prejudice for any one methodology. My work is driven by my mission to reduce unnecessary suffering in the workplace. If you... Read More →
avatar for Doug Depew

Doug Depew

Enterprise Agile Conslutant, Looking Glass Consulting LLC
Agile / Lean Consultant who has experience with some of the largest enterprise agile adoptions in the US. From the team level to C level, Doug has helped organizations go from Forming to Performing. Check out his workshop with Linda Cook on 'Taming the Agile Release Planning Beast' on Wednesday.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 7/8/9

14:00

Stalwarts: Luke Hohmann (Luke Hohmann)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Luke Hohmann

Luke Hohmann is the Founder and CEO of Conteneo, Inc. Grounded in the science of play, Conteneo’s enterprise software platforms and professional services merge serious games, data analytics, domain expertise and collaboration to help enterprises optimize decision making in areas of strategy, innovation, sales, product development and market research. Conteneo's games include Innovation Games®, Knowsy® and Strategy Engine. Luke is co-founder of Every Voice Engaged Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that helps citizens and governments tackle technical and wicked social problems. He’s also written four books with long titles and has served on the Board of the Agile Alliance.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.






Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 2

14:00

A Poet's Guide to Automated Testing (George Dinwiddie)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When first starting out with automated acceptance tests, people are often happy just to get them to run correctly. Soon, however, they start finding they have to rewrite their old scenarios when new features are added. Or they disable some scenarios "for now" so they can continue to make progress. Newcomers need explanations to understand the tests. So do the business analysts. It even takes you awhile to figure out some of the older tests. Then, one day, the VP stops by, asking about them...
The crucial aspect of test automation is creating clear and expressive descriptions of the system being built. It’s easy to write tests that a computer can understand. But can you write tests that people, even non-technical people, can understand? Will it be obvious whether or not the test is correct? This is not a matter of dumbing things down.
Highlight the concepts. Express just the right details. There is a synergy between the expressiveness of tests and the maintainability. Achieving clarity in natural language is essential for their long-term viability. Come get some hints on expressing your tests clearly and succinctly.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Notice the effect of word choice
  • Select words for clarity and descriptiveness
  • Describing the assumed context
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Software Development Coach, iDIA Computing
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 6/7

14:00

User Story Mapping: Don't Lose the Big Picture (Jeff Patton)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
A story map is a simple way to visualize your product idea from your users’ perspective. Mapping your product's story uses the same approach scriptwriters use to think through a movie or TV story idea. It's fast, collaborative, and telling your product's story helps you spot the holes in your thinking. Once created, a map lets you think through options and alternative ideas that'll make your product better. It's easy to slice out what you think is a smallest viable product, and to identify the next experiment that'll help you validate your product concept.
In this workshop, you'll learn story mapping by building a simple map collaboratively with others. You'll learn how to use story maps to make sense of how users and customers do things today, and how they might do things better with your product. You'll learn how to use story maps to drive Lean Startup style experimentation, as well as heads-down Agile software development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how to use story maps to break down large feature ideas into small deliverable pieces
  • Understand how release strategies focus your release on smaller minimum viable product releases
  • Understand how development strategies reduce risk and increase learning
  • Understand how experimentation helps validate your product assumptions before you build



Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written code, and fast delivery isnt the secret to success, its just table stakes. Its actually deep understanding of your customers and users coupled with a desire to... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac C

14:45

Organization and Business Agility: Managing the Portfolio Backlog in Large Organizations (Ken Power)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Working in a multi-team, multi-program, multi-product environment brings several challenges. One of those is providing a smooth flow of work to teams, and incorporating their feedback, while staying responsive to the needs of the business in a changing environment. This Experience Report documents several years’ experience working in such environments. The focus of this Experience Report is specifically on managing the portfolio backlog, not the full scope of what could be considered under a portfolio management strategy and implementation. We have found that getting the portfolio backlog management strategy right is a key element in the success of the overall portfolio management approach.
It sounds like it should be straightforward: create a list of all the work the organization has to do, get the right people together, prioritize the work, make changes as needed. The reality proves to be far from obvious. The attempt to provide a portfolio backlog approach brings the organization’s agility into sharp focus. Those business units that make it work effectively find that having an approach for managing the portfolio of work contributes to overall organization responsiveness.
This Experience Report will share several lessons learned, and highlight some pitfalls to avoid, when designing your own portfolio backlog management approach.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Challenges and lessons drawn from several years of implementing portfolio backlog management approaches in multiple business units
  • Definitions that we use
  • Useful practices
  • Value of portfolio management
  • Relationship between managing the portfolio backlog, and the work done by teams
  • Relationship between product managers and product owners
  • Metrics
  • Visibility and transparency
  • Flow of work
  • Explicit investment in different area: features, capabilities, architecture and more
  • Rolling roadmaps, and how to communicate the portfolio to customers
  • The role of continuous planning
  • The portfolio backlog management meeting
  • The portfolio leadership team
  • Collaborating with customers and other stakeholders
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Principal Engineer, Cisco Systems, Inc.
Ken is a Principal Engineer and internal coach and consultant with Cisco Systems, Inc. He lives in Galway, Ireland and works with teams and organizations around the world. His responsibilities include leading the agile transformation for Ciscos largest software group. He also works with universities and research groups in agile, lean and software engineering research. He is currently completing a PhD in Lean Flow and understanding impediments... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:45 - 15:15
Potomac 4

14:45

Managing Technical Debt in Software Projects Using Scrum: An Action Research (Frederico Oliveira)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Ward Cunningham in his experience report presented at the OOPSLA'92 conference introduced the metaphor of technical debt. This metaphor is related to immature, incomplete or inadequate artifacts in the software development cycle that cause higher costs and lower quality. A strategy for the technical debt management is still a challenge because its definition is not yet part of the software development process. Carolyn Seaman and Yuepu Guo proposed a technical debt management framework based on three stages. First, debts are identified and listed. After that, debts are measured by their payment efforts and then debts are selected to be considered in the software development cycle. This study evaluates the application of this framework in the real context of software projects adopting Scrum. Action research is conducted in two companies where their projects have significant technical debt. We performed three action research cycles based on the three stages of the framework for both companies. The main contribution of this paper is to provide real experiences and improvements for projects using Scrum and that may adopt the technical debt management framework proposed by Seaman and Guo. Both teams recognized that the proposed approach is feasible for being considered in the software development process after some modifications. Because of projects time constraints and ease of use, we reduced the use of the proposed metrics to two: Principal and the Current Amount of Interest. In consequence, decision-making was benefitted by the early consideration of the debts that really need to be paid. Instead of using probabilities to find the interest, these are registered every time the technical debt occurs. During the first phase, the debts identification was improved when all Scrum roles participated, while measurement and decision-making were improved when the team was responsible for these phases. The Product Owner role in both companies understood the importance of Technical Debt monitoring and prioritization during a development cycle. With these changes, the two teams mentioned they would remain using the resulting approach.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Frederico Oliveira

Frederico Oliveira

Gerente de Desenvolvimento, Atlantic Solutions
Graduado e mestre em Engenharia de Computação, também com pós-graduação em Gerenciamento de Projetos e Engenharia de Software. Possui as certificações OCA Java 7, Scrum Master (SCM) e Management 3.0. Foi palestrante na Agile 2015 em Washington/EUA, além de participações nacionais como no TDC Florianópolis 2016, TDC Porto Alegre 2015 e Caipira Ágil Campinas 2015. Envolvimento no estudo/aplicação de assuntos relacionados a... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:45 - 15:15
National Harbor 8

15:45

Can you be remotely agile? (Mark Kilby)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Can you mix distribute open source culture with agile and lean principles? Sonatype is a unique company of open source leaders that produces software development support tools for companies that are struggling to keep track of their usage and risks of open source software components. Come hear how this startup has successfully used Scrum with completely distributed teams spread across multiple time zones. Find out what pre-conditions exist, principles we’re discovering, practices we use and continuing challenges we face as we coordinate the work of multiple teams across an open source product line with everyone working from a home-based office.

Learning Outcomes:


  • * What are possible pre-conditions for a successful completely distributed agile team?

  • * What are emerging principles for completely distributed agile teams?

  • * What practices work well for completely distributed agile teams across multiple time zones?





Speakers
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

Agile Coach, Sonatype
Since 1990, Mark Kilby has guided individuals, teams and organizations to develop unique software and system solutions for government, industry and academia. His roles have included software developer, technical lead, rocket scientist, principal investigator, technical architect, web development manager, methodologist, scrum master, product owner and agile coach (since 2003). His experience spans complete software development life cycles for a... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 16:15
Potomac 4

15:45

Introduction to Agile in Government Agencies (Sujatha Augustine)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
placeholder for curated track session

Learning Outcomes:


  • tbd





Speakers
SA

Sujatha Augustine

Director, Program Office, Millennium Challenge Corporation
Sujatha Augustine is the Director of the Program Office at the Millennium Challenge Corporation. She manages the disbursement, tracking, oversight, and governance of multi-million dollar budgets with international portfolios. Sujatha has over twenty-five years of extensive experience on diverse multi-million dollar projects with wide exposure to domestic and international business transactions. Prior to joining MCC, she founded Vital Partners... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

15:45

Global Teams: Cracking the Culture Code (Mike Palladino, David Bulkin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
More and more agile efforts involve development teams and stakeholder groups dispersed throughout the world. Distributed projects are more difficult to execute for obvious reasons, including time differences and language barriers, but cultural differences, and the lack of understanding them, create problems that no video conference, wiki, or international flight can solve.
You need to crack the culture code. By cracking the culture code for agile teams, you can establish credibility, overcome communication barriers, create an environment of trust and get things done.
Come to this interactive session that has been honed by over a decade of delivery and learn how to work with international teams and execute successful projects across geographical and culture divides.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop both cultural and self awareness
  • Learn ways to address cultural differences
  • Learn ways to build trust across cultures
  • Learn how to view cultural differences in a new light
  • Learn how cultural differences impact everyday interactions



Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

Managing Directior, Grow-Lean LLC
David Bulkin is the Managing Director at Grow-Lean where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience delivering software and systems and has been applying agile methods for 14 years across the entire value stream from strategy and product ideation to development and... Read More →
MP

Mike Palladino

Senior Manager, App Dev, ABIM
Michael Palladino is a Project and Program Management consultant and professional with broad experience across industries. He has held a variety of roles, including program and project manager, portfolio manager, business relationship manager and operational support. Mike has more than 20 years of information technology experience in a variety of industries, including health care, pharmaceutical, financial, insurance, music distribution and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

To collaborate, let's stop talking first (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Don't you just hate it when a collaboration conversation stalls out and the only sound you hear is crickets? Awk-waard. Or, when a conversation becomes a battle of wills between two strong people, each advocating for their idea as if it's life or death? Here we are, agilists, and we're supposed to know how to do collaboration, yet the reality of team collaboration is often not as rosy as the buzzword. We still largely rely on talking as a primary means of collaboration, but that is not always the highest bandwidth form of communication, surprisingly enough. In fact, methods that have people collaborate silently FIRST can be a better way to go.
In this session, you will experience one such method known as informal constellations -- they unstick conversations when they stall, unknot excessive advocacy and, generally, get the team's creative juices flowing again. They are incredibly powerful for helping a team see what's really happening so that they can make wiser decisions of all kinds, including how to better self-organize!
This is a workshop. First, you will experience the power of informal constellations as we do a few together. Then, you will be led, step-by-step, through the process of crafting constellations for your teams back home. In addition, the key aspects of successfully facilitating constellations will be revealed so that you can determine if you, or someone else, should step into the role of facilitator. This is a hands-on practical session, and includes a handout you can take home so you can better integrate what you learned. Constellations are fun and amazingly effective! Come play and learn.
Learning Outcomes:
  • people experience one method for juicing up collaborative conversations when they stall (informal constellations)
  • people see what is required to facilitate something like this successfully, and may begin to see the gap for themselves
  • people walk away with something ultra practical: an approach for conducting informal constellations with their teams
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac C

15:45

Sustainable Test-Driven Development (Scott Bain)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Sustainable Test-Driven Development
As Test-Driven Development has gained in momentum and popularity, it has also been called into question as a viable development strategy past the first 3-4 iterations in Agile projects. Many report that the test suite generated by the process can become a maintenance problem in and of itself, eventually collapsing under its own weight.
Is this an inherent problem with TDD, or simply a result of a misunderstanding of how TDD works, and what needs to be emphasized in order to keep it sustainable? In this presentation we will introduce the basics of automated test-driven development, and then briefly examine the specific factors that make it a sustainable process. This requires more than simply knowing how to write unit tests, but implies a style of test design that does not become un-maintainable as the test quite matures and grows in size.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to conduct the Test-Driven development process in a sustainable way. Also learn how/why TDD is also Test-Driven *Design*.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Bain

Scott Bain

Senior Trainer/Consultant, Net Objectives
Scott Bain is a 35+-year veteran in computer technology, with a background in development, engineering, and design. He has also designed, delivered, and managed training programs for certification and end-user skills, both in traditional classrooms and via distance learning. Scott teaches courses and consults on Agile Analysis and Design Patterns, Advanced Software Design, and Sustainable Test-Driven Development. Scott is a frequent speaker at... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

Introduction to Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS) (Bas Vodde)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS)
LeSS is a lightweight (agile) framework for scaling Scrum to more than one team. It was extracted out of the experiences of Bas Vodde and Craig Larman while Scaling Agile development in many different types of companies, products and industries over the last ten years. There are several case studies available and an upcoming book describing LeSS in detail.
LeSS consists of the LeSS Principles, the Framework, the Guides and a set of experiments. The LeSS framework is divided into two frameworks: basic LeSS for 2-8 teams and LeSS Huge for 8+ teams. All of these are also available on the less.works website.
LeSS is different with other scaling frameworks in the sense that it provides a very minimalistic framework that enables empiricism on a large-scale which enables the teams and organization to inspect-adapt their implementation based on their experiences and context. LeSS is based on the idea that providing too much rules, roles, artifacts and asking the organization to tailor it down is a fundamentally flawed approach and instead scaling frameworks should be minimalistic and allowing organizations to fill them in.
Introduction to LeSS
In this session, Bas Vodde and Craig Larman, the creators of LeSS, will be introducing some of the LeSS principles and run through the basic LeSS and LeSS Huge framework. This will be followed up with an interactive Q&A session with the audience.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What is LeSS?
  • What are the LeSS Principles?
  • How do the two LeSS Frameworks work?
  • Why should you scale up rather than tailor down?


Speakers
avatar for Bas Vodde

Bas Vodde

Odd-e
Bas Vodde is a coach, programmer, trainer, and author related to modern agile and lean product development. He is the creator of the LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework for scaling agile development. He coaches organizations on three levels: organizational,  team,  individual/technical practices. He has trained thousands of people in software development, Scrum, and modern agile practices for over a decade. He is the author... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

The Sprint 3 Revolt - How our large scale transformation nearly failed (Raj Mudhar, Jason Alexander)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
At the start of 2014, we cut over 2000+ people at American Express from waterfall to a full agile concept and delivery life cycle. Confidence was high despite the risk. A year of diligent preparation had put all the textbook conditions for success in place: senior leadership was on board; employees were psyched; we had coaches on the ground; a well thought-out agile Software Development Life Cycle; and a continuous integration and delivery infrastructure ready to go. Expectations were managed for the whole organization that the first few sprints for the 40+ scrum teams would be turbulent. Then Sprint Three happened. A revolt erupted across our teams that threatened the whole transformation. The window of opportunity to get it back on track was dwindling. This talk lays out what happened, the five-WHYs behind it, the resolution, and what others can learn from our experience when embarking on a large scale transformation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Transformation Conditions for Success - what every large organization needs to succeed
  • Optimizing the Whole - How failing to look at the bigger picture can spell doom
  • Leadership - the importance of rapid response at the right time
  • Lessons Learned Summary - what you can do to avoid the mistakes we made, and a few things we did right along the way (including building an early warning system)
Attachments:

Speakers
JA

Jason Alexander

Head of Digital Delivery, Chase
Jason recently joined Chase to lead Delivery across the rapidly evolving Digital efforts of the bank. Prior to Chase, Jason led Product Development for Enterprise Growth at American Express. In his four years in Enterprise Growth, he led User Experience, Product Strategy and Planning and Product Management for Serve. In 2014, he led the transition of Enterprise Growth to Agile including running the teams handling prioritization, definition, and... Read More →
RM

Raj Mudhar

Deloitte Canada


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 5/6

15:45

Value Stream Mapping Workshop (or: Improve your Organizational Efficiency) (Nayan Hajratwala)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Do you wonder how to go about improving:
  • the three weeks it takes to onboard a new employee?
  • the eight weeks it takes to get a new laptop provisioned?
  • the three months it takes to get a feature deployed into production?
  • the six months it takes to get a new server installed in the data center?
Value Stream Mapping is a technique that can help to uncover bottlenecks, queues, and silos in any of your organizational processes. In this session you'll see real examples of Value Stream Maps from my clients and how they were used to make changes. We'll then break up into teams and create value stream maps of your processes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the components of a Value Stream Map
  • Understanding how to translate a Value Stream Map into actionable tasks.



Speakers
avatar for Nayan Hajratwala

Nayan Hajratwala

Lean / Agile Coach, Chikli Consulting
Nayan Hajratwala is the owner of Chikli Consulting. A Lean/Agile Coach with over 15 years of hands-on experience delivering software, he has significant programming experience and is a deep technologist always exploring new languages and ideas. His specialties include training software teams to increase their productivity and decrease their time-to-market while improving the quality of their product. Nayan is a speaker at many user groups and... Read More →


VSM pdf

Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

15:45

'What?', 'So what?', 'NOW WHAT?' How to use data to influence others (Larry Maccherone)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
The evening before the space shuttle Challenger explosion, scientists at NASA caught what they thought was a potentially catastrophic risk with the o-rings considering the unusually cold temperature expected for the morning’s launch. They brought the issue to management attention but failed to influence the final decision enough to stop the launch. As a leader in your organization, your failure to influence may not cost lives but it could be “catastrophic” for your business.
Metrics and data are just the "What?" You need comparisons, trends, and benchmarks to get at the "So what?" But none of that matters until it changes what you and your organization do next... the "Now what?" Fact is, "We don't see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." ~The Talmud. Metrics are used as often as not to simply justify our past decisions. It takes a different approach to get the right decisions and behavior change out of your data.
This talk addresses the people side of metrics and data. How do you steer the emotional elephant of your organization or appeal to the risk tolerance level of your stakeholders? How to think about decisions in a way that avoids your own cognitive biases and those of your executives? Come to this session for the answer to these questions and more.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to get action and behavior change from data analysis
  • The do's and don'ts of visualization
  • How others lie with data
  • How to communicate uncertainty and still get action
  • * Understand cognitive biases and how to avoid them in yourself and others



Speakers
avatar for Larry Maccherone

Larry Maccherone

Optimizer, AgileCraft
Larry Maccherone is an accomplished author and highly rated speaker who has regularly presented at major international conferences on Lean and Agile. He is very excited to have recently joined AgileCraft where his passion for analytics and visualization is helping AgileCraft be the best way to scale Agile. Prior to that, he led the Insights product line at Rally Software. His core area of expertise is drawing interesting insights from data... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7

15:45

Can you hear me now? Start listening instead (Judith Mills)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Have you experienced teams that lack ownership, that keep going to management for the answers that just won’t “step up”? In this session we will discuss why listening can help people and teams rise to the occasion and take ownership. By listening effectively we can ask the right questions for people and teams to change perceptions and take ownership.
In this interactive session we will talk about and practice listening and asking questions.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Scrum Master, coaches, mentors, and leaders at all levels will experience:
  • 1. How we stop listening once we think we know the answer
  • 2. How listening builds trust and respect
  • 3. How listening and asking builds ownership
  • 4. How asking questions can change perceptions
  • 5. Types of questions: Permission; Sharp; Probing; Outcome; - Reflection; Default/Always available questions; checking assumptions
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Judith Mills

Judith Mills

Coach, Judith Mills LLC
Judith Mills is an experienced software executive turned independent coach specializing in making organizations efficient with multiple Agile methodologies. Judith has extensive experience in guiding large organizations and teams through the adoption of Agile to create efficient and adaptable departments that deliver reliably and repeatedly. These organizations and teams have varied from smaller teams with everyone in one room to... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 3

15:45

Lightning Talks: Technical and People (Crowd Sourced Voting) (Lightning Talks)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The purpose of the Lightning Talks Track is to provide a lightweight, flexible opportunity for speakers to share valuable information with participants. Presentations style include 7 minute Pecha Kucha style presentation and slideless 3 minute Lightning Talk.
If statements are evil! (Declan Wheelan)
Hunting Robots: Rapid creation of a mobile/iBeacon app (Anton McConville)
DevOps for the Cloud (Arthur Meloy)
Abstraction v. Duplication (Tim Ottinger)
The Virtue of Coercion (Dan Mezick)
The Spine Model (Kevin Trethewey)
Take Back Agile (to it's lightweight productive roots) (Ron Quartel)
Just-in-time Lightning Talks: If you want to give a just-in-time talk, you can sign up in Open Jam or 10 minutes prior to the start of a session.
Lightning Talk submissions can be seen here: http://agile-lightning.ideascale.com/
Learning Outcomes:


  • .




Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

15:45

Agile Chartering from Strategic to Tactical: Managing Risk & Quality (Ainsley Nies, Elizabeth McClellan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Agile chartering adds practices associated with starting a project or stream of work– previously missing from the Agile “body of knowledge”–and connects the work with the larger organizational strategy and direction. Through agile chartering we consider the whole system that delivers business value. In this interactive session Ainsley, Elizabeth and Diana will demonstrate how the model of agile chartering from Liftoff: Launching Agile Teams and Projects can clarify direction through all organizational levels and amplify strategic intent with aligned tactics. We will present a high-level description of the agile chartering elements and participants will practice the activities used to mitigate project risk and reinforce the team’s ability to deliver quality products.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will:
  • • Identify a list of tools and techniques for chartering teams to strengthen business strategy, mitigate risks, and achieve quality
  • • Practice with visual tools and techniques for elements of chartering
  • • Discuss pros, cons, and applications of tools and techniques for chartering
Attachments:

Speakers
EM

Elizabeth McClellan

Visual Notes Artist, Elizabeth McClellan
Conversations are not linear. Topics move round and ideas bounce. My challenge is to capture the moment with text and images in order for participants to retain information. Ask me how to make your conversations visible.elizmcclellan.com


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Stalwarts: Elisabeth Hendrickson (Elisabeth Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Elizabeth Hendrickson

Elisabeth Hendrickson, better known as testobsessed, has been kicking around the software industry for a couple decades in a variety of roles including tester, developer, and agile enabler. Author of Explore It! from Pragmatic Bookshelf, she is also known for her Google Tech Talk on Agile Testing and popular Test Heuristics Cheatsheet. She won the prestigious Gordon Pask Award from the Agile Alliance in 2010. In 2012 after more than a decade as an independent consultant, she joined Pivotal, the company where she first learned extreme programming. She is now a senior director of engineering.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.





Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 2

15:45

UseTables to Drive out Ambiguity/Redundancy, Discover Scenarios, and Solve World Hunger (Ken Pugh)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ambiguous or missing requirements cause waste, slipped schedules, and mistrust with an organization. Implementing a set of misunderstood requirements produces developer and customer frustration. Creating acceptance tests prior to implementation helps create a common understanding between business and development.
Acceptance tests start with communication between the members of the triad- business, developer, and tester. In this session, we specifically examine how to use tables as an effective means of communication. Employing tables as an analysis matrix helps a team discover missing scenarios. Redundant tests increase test load, so we show how performing an analogy of Karnaugh mapping on tables can help reduce redundant scenarios. We demonstrate that examining tables from various aspects, such as column headers, can reduce ambiguity and help form a domain specific language (DSL). A consistent DSL decreases frustration in discussing future requirements.
We briefly show how to turn the tables into tests for Fit and Gherkin syntax.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to elicit details of a requirement using tabular format
  • How to use tables to search for missing scenarios in acceptance tests
  • How to discover ambiguity and redundancy in acceptance tests
  • A way to logically connect tables to classes and modules
  • How to break complicated requirements represented by tables into smaller ones
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ken Pugh

Ken Pugh

Fellow Consultant, Net Objectives
Ken Pugh (ken.pugh@netobjectives.com, @kpugh, facebook/kpughconsutl) is a fellow consultant with Net Objectives (www.netobjectives.com). He helps companies transform into lean-agility through training and coaching. His particular interests are in communication (particularly effectively communicating requirements), delivering business value, and using lean principles to deliver high quality quickly. He also trains, mentors, and testifies on... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13

15:45

User Experience Branding: How to build products that create loyal customers (Bill Beard)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Why do certain products create passionate users while others struggle to gain traction? Is it Design? Usability? Simplicity? No. It’s branding. Branding isn’t just the purview of the marketing team anymore. In today’s crowded marketplace, making a product that works--or even works well--is no longer good enough. User Experience Branding is a process that helps build loyal customers and brand ambassadors by integrating our brand experience with our user experience.
Tailored for anyone involved or interested in the product development process, at any experience level, from CEOs to designers and developers, this talk will cover the role of emotion within the decision-making process and how influencing a user’s emotions during a product experience translates to brand loyalty. I’ll explain the fundamentals and purpose behind branding and why we need to focus on it more when designing experiences. I'll demonstrate, with examples, how certain product organizations stay ahead of their competition by curating their brand. Finally, I’ll offer some quick tips for building your brand through your product, called Branding Moments, designed for Lean/Agile teams to execute swiftly, that they can start implementing immediately.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Why minimum viable products are no longer viable
  • Why certain products develop loyal users and others fail to gain traction
  • How emotions influence decision-making
  • The role of emotion in branding
  • Why the way we execute branding has had to change in the face of Lean/Agile
  • Why incorporating brand into your experience is critical
  • How to turn users into loyal customers
  • Tactics for applying User Experience Branding within your experience
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bill Beard

Bill Beard

Founder & Creative Director of Beard Branding
Bill Beard is the founder of Beard Branding, a Lean Branding, Copywriting and UX firm. He helps organizations of any size build loyal a customer base by developing brands that can adapt and succeed in today’s competitive marketplaces. Bill has worked with organizations such as UCLA, Philips, Gilt, JPMorgan Chase, TheLadders, and startups including Ribbon and Wherewithal. He has spoken on branding at conferences throughout the U.S. and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 8

15:45

No Dream Crushing: Human Centered Solutions using Design Thinking (Kathryn Kuhn, Skip Angel)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What do our customers really need? This question plagues every Product Owner and yet so few Product Owners feel like they are equipped to answer this question well. Asking the customer directly is one method, but all too often the customer isn’t able to express that answer in an actionable way. We spend more time trying to manage large backlogs and write stories rather than working closer to customers to discover what they really need.
The solution? Design Thinking has been an approach for many years in the design world, made popular by IDEO and taught at places like Stanford’s D School. Only recently, have some in the Agile community started to apply this process to software product discovery. Lean Startup and Customer Development techniques are teaching us to get outside the building and validate our ideas with our true customers. In this session, you’ll learn to leverage key insights from both of these to create a collaborative and experimental framework to sense, create, and respond to ever-evolving user needs.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduction to Design Thinking and how it has been applied to Product and Customer Discovery
  • How Design Thinking can help inform better customer interviews as well as better organization of the information gathered about customers and potential customers
  • How the Build-Measure-Learn framework can help inform and structure the overall Product Management and Scrum framework
  • Gain insight on how to apply this to your current Agile team and where to learn more
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Skip Angel

Skip Angel

Chief Pathfinder, CA Technologies
I have over 25 years of experience in software development in a variety of roles such as Developer, Project Manager, Consultant and Chief Technology Officer. Over the last 7 years, I have provided thought leadership, training and coaching to new and experienced teams interested in agile practices including Lean/Kanban, Scrum, and Extreme Programming (XP). My unique focus in helping companies achieve organizational agility and transformation... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Kuhn

Kathryn Kuhn

Director of Services - West Region, Ca Technologies/Rally Software
@kathryn_e_kuhn Kathryn is a Director of Agile Services and Transformation Consultant with Rally (now CA Technologies). Kathryn began her career at Accenture in Washington DC, has done service work in Guatemala, moved her family to Singapore and now calls the San Francisco Bay Area home. She’s been practicing Agile techniques in its various forms for about 12 years in large and small companies. She holds several Agile certifications including... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 1/2/3

16:30

Lean Sales Up - Making value since the pre-sale stage (Jorge Silva)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The process of pre-sales can be painful, long and expensive.
It’s the first negotiation stage. You have to convince the prospect that you are the best
option. And we have to adjust the customer’s always-high expectations. And therefore,
this leads to over estimation, lies about times and deadlines, and a lot of non-healthy
behaviors that get the relationship dirty at the beginning.

However, there is always a way to improve and to get a balance, where both the
customer and the provider feel confortable, satisfied and secure.
In this report experience, we will explore how to merge the delicate and costly sales
process with the agile/lean principles.
We will reflect about how to identify what really adds value to the proposal or contract.
Since this is an experience report, we will stand in real experiences and real examples,
which will go with every concept, idea and thought mention in this report. So this is no
theory on practice, but theory from practice.
The goal is to show how to start adding value from the ground-zero stage. The idea is to
generate value from the conception of the product/project. Eliminate waste as the lean
thinking predicates.
To meet our goal, we will share our experience in several sales processes, talking
mainly about these topics:
• How to manage time request
• How to generate trust through transparency
• How to give flexibility and empowerment to the customer
• How to revert the "fix feature oriented” thought to a more time box approach.
• How to educate the customer with some agile concepts and practices.
• How to become a partner with the customer, and stop being a provider
Learning Outcomes:
  • Audience could take lot of tips, tools and ideas sprung from real experiences. It most important, it will be able to start using it easily in their daily work.


Speakers
avatar for Jorge Silva

Jorge Silva

Co-Founder, 10Pines
I'm a software developer who has more than 10 years in the field. In the last 5 years Im leading a company that is strongly based on the agile principles. Lately we had participated in several bids, generating time for reflection and to improve our sales skills. In particular, bids for companies such as Starbucks, Burger King and Telecom with successful results.