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Monday, August 3
 

09:00

Awesome Superproblems (Luke Hohmann)
Abstract:
The agile values and practices we all hold dear give us more than the ability to tackle problems associated with software development. They give us the ability to tackle Awesome Superproblems. These are problems that are bigger than an one person and get worse through inaction. However, when we make progress on solving Awesome Superproblems we find that new patterns that can be applied to solve classes of similar problems.
In this keynote Luke will show the collaborative, social, and serious games that have their roots in the Agile Community have blossomed into multidimensional frameworks that are being used by agilists around the world to solve awesome superproblems. Without any special superpowers except a willingness to try.
Luke is the Founder and CEO of Conteneo, Inc. Conteneo 's collaborative frameworks and data analytics helps enterprises optimize decision making. They span areas of strategy, innovation, business agility and market research. Luke is also co-founder of Every Voice Engaged Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that helps citizens and governments tackle technical and wicked social problems.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .


Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac A/B

10:45

Three Keys to Self-Direction and Leadership (Christopher Avery)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Self-efficacy is the belief in one's competence to produce expected results. Research shows self-efficacy is highly correlated with self-direction and leadership. And, most importantly, self-efficacy can be developed.
Effective application of three mental tools (often unconscious tools with which you are already equipped) develop self-efficacy, self-direction, and leadership. Each of these mental tools can be brought into clearer consciousness and exercised like a muscle so that you become increasingly effective and confident in your abilities to lead yourself and others. And each has been widely studied and documented as an important aspect of leadership.
The three keys are intention, awareness, and confront:
  • Intention means to want, believe, and expect that you will produce an outcome or result. Many models of personal leadership development are built on the power of intention (think of vision or goals, for example).
  • Awareness means that you examine, know, and understand yourself in relation to others and the environment. Awareness is the first key to change. Developing self-awareness has been, and remains, the number one approach to leadership development.
  • The second leading approach to leadership development is progressive challenge, aka, to face or to confront. Confront means to be present and centered with one's uncertainty, fear, or anxiety while stretching into new experiences that allow new discoveries and abilities to unfold. Leaders confront impediments and opportunities.
In this session you will learn to access, apply, and develop your mental powers of intention, awareness, and confront. You will learn to combine them to take ownership of opportunities and to break through problems -- so you have more confidence in yourself, and so others will want to follow you.
Learning Outcomes:
  • After this interactive session, you will be able to
  • Relate intention, awareness, and confront to leadership of self and others.
  • Access your mental powers of intention, awareness, and confront more directly and consciously in times of opportunity or challenge.
  • Understand and have tools to deal with what get's in your way -- what get's you stuck -- when you are trying to use your intention, awareness, and confront.
  • Have language and concepts you can use to discuss, make agreements about, and develop self-direction and leadership in your teams.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery

CEO, The Responsibility Company
UNLOCKING YOUR NATURAL ABILITY TO LIVE AND LEAD WITH POWER. Christopher Avery "The Responsibility Process guy" is a reformed management consultant. After a decade helping corporations help smart, ambitious professionals find ways to cope with lives they don't want and think they... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

10:45

Stalwarts: Ron Jeffries and Chet Hendrickson (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ron Jeffries and Chet Hendrickson

Ron Jeffries is one of the authors of the Agile Manifesto, coached the first Extreme Programming team and is a Certified Scrum Trainer. He is the owner/operator of two of Agile’s most prolific web sites, RonJeffries.com and XProgramming.com. His most recent book is The Nature of Software Development, released early in 2015. He is an outspoken supporter of technical improvement and excellence in Agile Software Development. Despite his sometimes gruff demeanor he is often thought to be a teddy bear at heart. We can neither confirm nor deny this belief.

Chet Hendrickson has been involved with Agile Software Development since 1996, when as a member of Chrysler’s C3 project he helped develop Extreme Programming. In 2000, Ron Jeffries, Ann Anderson, and Chet wrote Extreme Programming Installed. It detailed XP’s core practices, how to do them, and how they work together to help teams be successful. Since 2002, Chet has been an independent consultant, coach, and trainer. In 2009, he was asked by the Scrum Alliance to help develop the Certified Scrum Developer program. Chet and Ron Jeffries taught the first CSD course and continue to offer them in the United States and Europe. He has been a Certified Scrum Trainer since 2009.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.


Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.













Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 2

11:30

'Exploring your Congenital Agility' or 'Why I brought my Mother to Agile 2015' (Caleb Brown)
Abstract:
What does spinning yarn, knitting, and weaving have to do with Agile? Why would a guy willingly choose to do a joint talk with his Mother at a major convention? Simply put: they were major contributors to his Agile understanding, decades before the term Agile even existed. In this talk you will hear a family history of Agility and be challenged to explore your own Congenital Agility along with notions you may hold as "Common Sense". This personal exploration will help you to thrive in that often frustrating pursuit of bringing those around you to an understanding of Agility and help you to better cope with the stresses and frustrations that seem to demoralize too many Agile coaches and champions today.
Learning Outcomes:
  • To come to an understanding of how your personal history, going back to childhood, has affected you in ways you may not even understand when it comes to your Agile thinking, and equip with you a tool to help you cope with the stresses involved in bringing Agile to folks who seem to be frustratingly resistant to the idea.
Attachments:

Speakers
CB

Caleb Brown

Collabnet


Monday August 3, 2015 11:30 - 12:00
Potomac 4

14:00

Stalwarts: Linda Rising (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Linda Rising

Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the area of object-based design metrics. She is an internationally known presenter on topics related to agile development, patterns, retrospectives, the change process, and the connection between the latest neuroscience and software development. Linda is the author of numerous articles and has published several books: Design Patterns in Communications, The Pattern Almanac 2000, A Patterns Handbook, and with co-author Mary Lynn Manns, Fearless Change: Patterns for introducing new ideas and just released in 2015--More Fearless Change. Her web site: www.lindarising.org

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.









Speakers
avatar for Linda Rising

Linda Rising

Queen of Patterns, Linda Rising LLC
Linda Rising is an independent consultant based in Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the field of object-based design metrics and a background that includes university teaching and industry work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 2

15:45

Diagnosing and Changing Stuck Patterns in Teams (Marsha Acker)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you want to be able to “trust the wisdom of the group” but find it difficult? Do you ever feel like you’re having the same conversation over and over again with no real progress? Do you ever feel like you are stuck in a disagreement and not sure how to move forward?
If any of these issues are standing in the way of your work with groups and teams ‐ ‘how’ you are having (or not having) the conversation is likely contributing to your challenges. Research consistently demonstrates that team effectiveness is highly dependent upon the quality of the communication between team members. Yet it’s easy to get into the flow of daily work and be really focused on the ‘what’ in our conversations without much attention to the quality of ‘how’ we’re communicating.
As an agile coach one of the most important ways you can serve your team is to help them unlock the wisdom that exists within the team itself and have the conversations they need to have. We’ll explore a framework for learning to ‘read the room’ using four elements for all face-to-face communication. We’ll do some live practice to apply the framework to a conversation and then identify some typical patterns of “stuck” communications that can lead to “breakdowns” in teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn a language for how to ‘read the room’ and describe the structure of what’s happening in conversations
  • Explore the four elements of all face-to-face communications
  • Discuss the benefits of each element and the traps of ‘stuck patterns’
  • Discuss techniques that can be used by facilitators to create more effective conversations
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marsha Acker

Marsha Acker

CEO, TeamCatapult
Marsha Acker is a leadership and team coach whose passion and expertise is helping leaders and teams identify and break through stuck patterns that get in their way of high performance. Marsha founded TeamCatapult, a leadership development and organizational change firm, in 2005... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 1/2/3

15:45

Did We Buy or Just Lease the Agile Car? (Matt Anderson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It is no secret that more and more companies are adopting Agile. The challenge is that many of them treat it like buying or leasing a car. They take the Agile car for a test drive, like how it handles and then make the purchase/lease without considering the total price of the vehicle over the lifetime of the investment.
When the Agile car is only leased, it is a business liability that has a planned obsolescence. The company throws money at a short-term problem that they will plan to replace with whatever the next model will be once the lease runs out. Maintenance and care will be invested at only at the level that meets the lease agreement. This short-term approach prevents the cultural all-in strategy that Enterprise Agile requires.
If the Agile car is bought, it becomes a capital asset. It can depreciate depending on what make and model is purchased or it can become a long-term asset that increases in value. Maintenance is included as part of the expense of ownership and is based off of the planned longevity of the asset. Corporate culture is modeled to embrace Agile as a core decision-making tenant, not just for development purposes but across the Enterprise.
Matt Anderson will discuss the common challenges that a sustained enterprise agile adoption will encounter over time and ways to overcome them to ensure the corporate Agile car stays in top condition and is an asset and competitive advantage to the company.
Based on lessons learned at Cerner Corporation, Matt will discuss how to handle sustained enterprise challenges like:
1) Re-organizations
2) Annual Planning
3) C-Suite prioritization shifts
4) Team changes
5) Burn-out and Cargo Cults
6) Suboptimization within organizations that decreases enterprise throughput
7) Leadership power struggles
8) Mergers and Acquisitions
While Kaizen is the desired maintenance approach, Kaikaku "accidents" happen that require some major repairs or restoration. Enterprise Agile has to handle both smoothly to truly be an competitive advantage. This has to be a core competency within the organization, independent of reliance on external consultants.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to:
  • Diagnose potential problems at the enterprise level
  • Determine which tool to use to perform the necessary maintenance. This goes beyond the generic "hold a retrospective" or "collaborate" answers commonly given.
  • Have confidence that Enterprise Agility is not a buzz-word or temporary fad and is attainable and worth the investment
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7

15:45

Six Rules for Change (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Change is often much slower than hoped for, and more painful than anticipated. In the end, you may be left with feelings of frustration and dismay rather than the benefits you hoped for. How can we make change--whether it's adopting Scrum at the team level, or agile at the enterprise level--more successful, and more enlivening?
Through my work with many organizations, I've distilled principles for successful transformation into Six Rules for Change. These principles address both the complexity of the organization and the complexity of the human experience of change. They provide a set of touch-points to guide Change Artists as they support and enable change in their organizations.
  • Center yourself, consider the context and your connection to the people who are being asked to change.
  • Honor what is valuable about the past and what is working now. Honor the human experience of change.
  • Assess what is possible from where you stand, and who will work with you.
  • Assess the trust and advice networks in your organization. Weave intentional networks. Don’t rely only on the formal hierarchy.
  • Guide the change, and consider what aspects can evolve locally and where global principles apply.
  • Design experiments and evaluate results. Big changes scare people. Experiments help people practice and learn.
Following the principles in the Six Rules for Change can dramatically improve the chance the change you want will stick.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The Six Rules for Change, and examples of how to apply them.
  • How the Six Rules fit together and mutually reinforce each other
  • Why the Six Rules work, when traditional change models fail
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

Founder, esther derby associates, inc.
I draw on four decades of experience leading, observing, and living through organizational change. In 1997, I founded esther derby associates, inc. and work with a broad array of clients from Fortune 500 companies to start ups. My approach blends attention to humans and deep knowledge... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac C

15:45

Stalwarts: Jeff Sutherland (Jeff Sutherland)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Jeff Sutherland

Jeff Sutherland started the first Scrum team in 1993 and formalized the Scrum process with Ken Schwaber in 1995. As CEO, CTO, or VP of Engineering he has evolved Scrum in 11 of his own companies and co-authored the Agile Manifesto in 2001. Currently, as CEO of Scruminc.com he leads agile transformations worldwide while serving as Senior Advisor to Open View Venture Partners with almost a billion dollars invested in dozens of Scrum companies. The goal is to more than double investment returns using Scrum. See Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.


Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.











Speakers
avatar for Jeff Sutherland

Jeff Sutherland

Founder and Chairman, Scrum, Inc.
CoCreator of Scrum


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 2
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

09:00

Stalwarts: Jeff Patton (Jeff Patton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton helps companies adopt a way of working that’s focused on building great products, not just building stuff faster. Jeff blends a mixture of Agile thinking, Lean and Lean Startup Thinking, and UX Design and Design Thinking to end up with a holistic product-centric way of working. Jeff is author of the bestselling O’Reilly book User Story Mapping which describes a simple holistic approach to using stories in Agile development without losing sight of the big picture. You can learn more about Jeff at: jpattonassociates.com.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.







Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 2

10:45

Data Done Right: Applying Agile and XP Concepts To Enterprise Data Integration (Joseph Frazier, Randy Loushin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Data projects often come with the perception that they are lengthy and expensive endeavors, which is an issue when speed-to-market is critical to business success. In an age where data is everything, how do you ensure projects are delivered both on-time and with the highest quality?
Come see how Nationwide Insurance has combined the best practices found in Agile, Lean, and Extreme Programming to deliver data integration projects faster, cheaper, and with higher quality. Topics to be covered include:
-- Learn how to achieve smaller, incremental delivery while navigating the waters of big business process. -- Give the customer exactly what they want by tearing down the walls between IT and Business. -- Follow the life of a story card as it enters the development life-cycle, using Cucumber and Rspec to test drive our application. -- Discover how blending the lines between development and testing results in increased productivity and team capability. -- Solve the headaches found during upgrades and regression testing through continuous integration. See all this and more as Nationwide Insurance shows you what we think is the correct way to deliver data!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Practical use of test driven development for data integration.
  • Approach to facilitating poly-skilling of resources between development and testing roles, to build a true software craftsman.
  • How to leverage continuous integration, with data to prevent defect injection in a complex environment.
  • Ability to adapt iterative development concepts to data.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Randy Loushin

Randy Loushin

Nationwide
Randy Loushin has 6+ years in the data integration and data warehousing space, and has been leading data integration projects using Agile and test driven development for the past three years. At Nationwide Insurance, a Fortune 100 company with an operating revenue of $25 billion... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Three Things You MUST Know to Transform Any Sized Organization into an Agile Enterprise (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The deeper we go down the path of scaled agile transformation, the more we are learning that adding additional process and additional complexity can only ever get us part of the way there. At some point size and complexity is going to limit our ability to be truly agile. To be truly agile, we have to reduce size and complexity and move toward greater organizational simplicity.
The challenge is that large organizations ARE often complex and usually anything but simple. Most agile transformations get started by either ignoring the complexity inherent in the system or by wrapping that complexity in planning constructs that can help in the short run, but are ultimately doomed to limit your business agility over time. There has to be another way.
To really achieve agility at scale, we have to stop chasing more advanced ways to manage complexity and seek out more effective patterns for moving toward greater simplicity. In short, it’s not the end state of an agile transformation that we must stay focused on, it’s the systematic process of reducing complexity that is critical to achieving your ultimate business goals.
To transform any sized organization into an agile enterprise, there are only three things you need to know to be successful:
  1. You must have complete cross functional teams
  2. You must have clear backlogs
  3. You must have the ability to produce a working, tested increment of product on regular intervals.
Every other benefit of agile is impossible without creating these three conditions for success; everything that gets in the way of creating these three conditions is an impediment to your transformation which has to be removed; and your transformation roadmap should be solely focused on how your going to make all this possible in your organization. Until you make this happen... nothing much else is going to matter.
This talk will explore patterns for creating cross-functional teams at scale, what that looks like, what get’s in the way, and how to get there. We’ll discover why clear backlogs are so hard to create and what you'll need to do about it. Warning, this will not be easy! Finally, we’ll discuss why working tested software created on regular intervals is the secret sauce to actually getting the business benefits your organization is looking for.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn the critical importance of forming complete cross-functional teams, why many common patterns for forming teams fail, patterns for forming teams successfully, and strategies for progressively reducing dependencies between teams over time.
  • Participants will learn common failure patterns we see around creating backlogs, how the guidance contained in Scrum and SAFe can actually prevent some organizations from creating effective backlogs, and patterns for creating backlogs that really get teams moving quick.
  • Participants will learn what it really means to create a working, tested, increment at the end of every sprint, release, or PI. They will learn how making this kind of progress support solid delivery metrics, increases predictability, and earns the trust of the business over time



Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO and Founder, LeadingAgile
Mike Cottmeyer, LeadingAgile founder and CEO, is passionate about solving the challenges associated with Agile in larger, more complex enterprises. To that end, his company is dedicated to providing large-scale Agile transformation services to help pragmatically, incrementally, and... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

10:45

Stalwarts: Ahmed Sidky (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. (also know as Dr. Agile because of his doctorate in Agile) is the Director of Development Management at Riot Games where he leads a team of 60 internal agile coaches. Ahmed also serves as President of the International Consortium for Agile (ICAgile.com) – a methodology-agnostic accreditation and certification body helping deepen people’s agile competencies. Throughout his career, Ahmed has led a number of Fortune 100 companies through large-scale agile transformations using his culture-led transformation approach, which focuses on changing and introducing organizational habits critical to sustaining agility. He is the co-author of “Becoming Agile in an Imperfect World”, and is a seasoned speaker who has made several keynote appearances worldwide.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.











Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky

Head of Business Agility, Riot Games
Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. known as Doctor Agile, is a well-known thought-leader in the Agile community. He is currently the Director of Development Management for Riot Games and before that he was a transformation consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the co-author of Becoming Agile... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 2

14:00

A Quantum Physicist and an Agile Executive Walk into a Bar (Jean Tabaka)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Woe to you agile executive in this 21st century world of disruption, chaos, non-local causes, unknown unknowns. You are expected to tend to your teams as they go through the agile adoption you’ve asked for. But who is watching over you and the toll this adoption takes on you? How do you make sense of all the pressures, caught between an existing bureaucracy and the demand for innovation. It is enough to drive one to drink. But if you happen to be walking into the bar with a quantum physicist, you are in for some surprising solace. More importantly, our physicist can warm you with amazing advice about the way of the world and what you can do about it. At last, some empathy. In this talk, Jean Tabaka takes us on the journey of the woeful agile executive struggling to succeed in a business structure that still embraces a Newtonian view of the world. Through empathy, a belief in the power of disorder, and the conviction that we all deserve joy in our work, we’ll explore what life is currently like for these executives; what we’d want it to be; and, how to get us there via 12 valuable practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Understand the power of the sense of our work (it sucks or it's great)
  • • Embrace chaos and disorder effectively in managing disruption and creativity based on quantum physics principles
  • • Create empathic contracts with those you report into and with those who report into you
  • • Amplify your successes beyond process and into the implicit and explicit social contracts
  • • Determine your next right thing to do of the 12 success patterns of agile executives



Speakers
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac D

14:00

Is Agile Project Management an Oxymoron? (Michael Nir)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The concept of Agile Project Management is somewhat controversial and some people might say that the concept of project management is inconsistent with Agile; however:
• If we look closely at a typical Agile team-level project, there is actually a lot of “project management” going on; it’s just a different kind of project management and the project management functions are distributed among different roles on an Agile team rather than being performed by a single individual called a “Project Manager”
• As we scale Agile beyond simple single-team projects to larger and more complex enterprise-level projects, there is definitely a need to integrate some level of project and program management with an Agile development approach
• There are many stereotypes and misconceptions about both “Agile and Waterfall” that make those two approaches seem like binary and mutually-exclusive choices that are polar opposites and are totally incompatible with each other
The objective of this presentation is to separate some of these stereotypes and misconceptions from reality and begin to see Agile and traditional plan-driven project management principles and practices as complementary to each other rather than competitive and examine how these two approaches can be blended together in real-world situations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand stereotypes and misconceptions that exist about traditional project management and Agile in order to develop an objective view of what Agile Project Management is
  • Learn to see Agile and traditional project management principles and practices as complementary rather than competitive and learn how to blend Agile and traditional project management principles and practices together in the right proportions to fit a given project situation
  • Learn the general differences in an Agile Project Management role and the shifts in thinking that project managers might need to make to operate successfully in an Agile environment
  • Discuss specific roles for Agile Project Managers in an Agile environment and the skills that will be needed to play those roles
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Michael Nir

Michael Nir

President , Lean Agile Inspiration Expert, Best Selling Author and Speaker, Sapir Consulting US
As an Agile Leadership Expert and Executive Coach, Michael’s initiatives with one Fortune 100 company are saving over $12 million in program costs, with completion dates more than a year ahead of schedule.Michael Nir, President Sapir Consulting US, is an enterprise lean-agile expert... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

Stalwarts: Dean Leffingwell (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Dean Leffingwell

Widely recognized as a leading authority on software development, Dean Leffingwell is an author, serial entrepreneur, and software development methodologist. He is the creator of the Scaled Agile Framework, and author of five books on software development. His most recent books Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise, and Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises, form much of the basis of modern thinking on Lean-Agile software development principles and practices. Founder of several successful startups, including Requisite, Inc., makers of RequisitePro (acquired by Rational), Mr. Leffingwell also served as Chief Methodologist to Rally Software, and prior to that, as a Sr. Vice President at Rational Software (now part of IBM). He currently serves as Chief Methodologist and CEO at Scaled Agile, Inc., which he co-founded in 2011.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.











Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

Chief Methodologist, Scaled Agile, Inc.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 2

15:45

Agile Data Warehousing/Business Intelligence: A Disciplined Approach (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Agile strategies are being applied on more-and-more data warehouse (DW)/business intelligence (BI) projects within government agencies than ever before. The heavy, serial, long-running traditional approaches of yesteryear are being cautiously abandoned for the lighter, collaborative, incremental approaches resulting from agile and lean thinking. But how does this work in practice? Agile strategies call into question virtually every single practice that the data community holds dear, and are often at odds with existing IT governance strategies, so how are agencies reconciling this in practice?
This presentation overviews both an agile and a lean strategy for teams developing a DW/BI solution. These strategies are based on a tailoring of the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) and Data Vault 2.0 (DV2) frameworks. We begin with a review of the differences between the traditional and agile ways of thinking, what the implications are for your organization, and how this can impact government agencies in the process of moving towards more agile ways of working. We then overview two lifecycles for DW/BI development, a Scrum-based agile strategy for the first release of a DW/BI solution and a lean Kanban-based strategy for future releases. Strategies for successfully initiating an agile DW/BI team will be covered, including how to weave user stories, agile data modelling, agile architectural modelling, and light-weight release planning together. A collection of agile database techniques will be overviewed, including agile data modelling, database testing, database refactoring, continuous database integration, and DV2 design strategies. The presentation ends with a summary of the people, process, and tooling challenges that you will face when transitioning to an agile approach on your DW/BI teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover why an agile/lean approach to DW/BI is preferred
  • Learn how successfully initiate an agile DW/BI team
  • Learn how to take agile and lean approaches to DW/BI development
  • Discover a collection of agile development practices for DW/BI teams
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Disciplined Agile, Inc.
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac D

15:45

Stalwarts: Craig Larman and Bas Vodde (Bas Vodde, Craig Larman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Craig Larman and Bas Vodde

Craig Larman, named one of the top 20 Agile influencers of all time, is the co-creator of LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum). Since 2005 he has worked with clients to apply the LeSS framework for scaling lean thinking and agile development to large, multisite, and offshore development. Craig is the author of several books, most recently Large-Scale Scrum: More with LeSS and the popular Agile & Iterative Development: A Manager's Guide. He is one of the first Certified Scrum Trainers and Practicing ScrumMasters, starting in the 1990s while at Chevron Research. Other clients include Xerox, Ericsson, JP Morgan, Cisco-Tandberg, Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, Alcatel-Lucent, UBS, bwin.party, Nokia Networks, Siemens Networks, and Ion Trading. Craig also served as chief scientist at Valtech and, while living in Bengaluru India at Valtech’s development centre, helped to create agile offshore development with LeSS.

Bas Vodde is the creator of Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS), a framework for scaling agile development. He authored Scaling Agile and Lean Development, Practices for Scaling Agile and Lean Development and the upcoming Large-Scale Scrum books. Bas led the Agile adoption in Nokia Networks and is involved with Agile adoptions in several large banks. He is the director of The LeSS Company and founder of Odd-e, an Agile software development, coaching, and training company in Asia. He is also the maintainer of the CppUTest C++ unit test framework and the Osaka Mac GUI automation library.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.







Speakers
avatar for Craig Larman

Craig Larman

assistant dishwasher
Biography: http://www.craiglarman.com/wiki/index.php?title=Craig_Larman
avatar for Bas Vodde

Bas Vodde

Odd-e
Bas Vodde is a coach, programmer, trainer, and author related to modern agile and lean product development. He is the creator of the LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework for scaling agile development. He coaches organizations on three levels: organizational,  team,  individual... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 2
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

09:00

Individuals, Interactions and Improvization (Jessie Shternshus)
Abstract:
As Agile Practitioners, we strive to make ourselves, our team and our delivery better. We can do this by being open to learning new ideas from other disciplines. Jessie's keynote, "Individuals, Interactions and Improvisation" will be fun and interactive. In it, Jessie will share stories and exercises from the world of Improvisation.
There are many parallels between agile team principles and the principles of Improvisation. Effective improvisers give their teammates unconditional support. They practice active listening and accept and build on each other's ideas. Jessie will explore these ideas and more. She will help and guide you in making your agile interactions more effective.
Jessie founded The Improv Effect in 2007. Her goal was to help businesses reach their full potential through interpersonal-communication skills training. They use an array of experiential techniques to transform teams and organizations. These cover teamwork, creative problem solving, on-boarding, presentation skills, and product development ideation sessions. Jessie also recently published a book called "CTRLShift: 50 Games For 50 ****ing Days Like today".

Learning Outcomes:
  • .




Wednesday August 5, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac A/B

10:45

Using a Design thinking process to approach a shift to Agile culture (Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Abstract:
Design Thinking refers to the methods and processes to investigate
complex problems in highly uncertain systems. This workshop is about
how to use this iterative process of observation, ideation and
implementation to better understand organisation's culture and create
reasons for people in the organisation to embrace Agile.
Summary:
This workshop is about how to use a design thinking process an
techniques to better understand organisation's culture and minimize
resistance to change in the creation of an Agile culture. The strategy
is to combine empathy for the context, creativity in the generation of
insights and solutions, and rationality to analyze and fit solutions
to the context. This solutions are aimed to create reasons for people
in the organisation to embrace Agile.
Description:
Design Thinking refers to the methods and processes to investigate
complex problems in highly uncertain systems, acquiring information,
analysing knowledge, and positing solutions. This workshop is about
the usage of this process to better understand organisation's culture
and minimise resistance to change in the creation of an Agile culture.
The strategy is to combine empathy for the context, creativity in the
generation of insights and solutions, and rationality to analyse and
fit solutions to the context. This solutions are aimed to create
reasons for people in the organisation to embrace Agile.
This iterative process of observation, ideation and implementation can
be integrated within your retrospectives and also applied outside IT
to create a continuous improvement engine for organisational culture
in organisations.
Mechanics:
10-15 minutes introduction
15-20 minutes for inspiration/observation techniques
(probably customer modelling & empathy map)
15-20 minutes for ideation techniques
(probably think in reverse & ideal world)
15-20 minutes for implementation techniques
(probably business model canvas & elevator pitch)
5-15 minutes closure

Learning Outcomes:
  • Deeper understanding of cultural change in organisations
  • Design thinking process
  • Design thinking inspiration/observation techniques
  • Design thinking ideation techniques
  • Design thinking implementation techniques



Speakers
avatar for Angel Diaz-Maroto

Angel Diaz-Maroto

Founder, DiazMaroto Corporate Coaching
Angel is a very energetic, proficient and forward-thinking Coach who specialises on coaching organisations throughout their Agile journeys. His pragmatism and experience in Organisational Coaching and Business Agility are the driving forces behind his perceptive methods of action... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 1/2/3

10:45

Stalwarts: Jim Benson (Jim Benson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Jim Benson
A pioneer in applying Lean and Kanban to knowledge work, and an internationally recognized speaker and author, Jim Benson is CEO of the collaborative management consultancy Modus Cooperandi and founding partner of Modus Institute. He is a fellow in the Lean Systems Society and recipient of the Brickell Key Award for Excellence in Lean Thinking. He is the creator of Personal Kanban and co-author of Personal Kanban: Mapping Work | Navigating Life, winner of the Shingo Research and Publication Award. His other books include Why Plans Fail, Why Limit WIP, and Beyond Agile.
What is a Stalwarts session?
Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.
Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.




Learning Outcomes:


  • .




Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 2

14:00

Entangled: Solving the Hairy Problem of Team Dependencies (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When portfolio and program managers undertake quarterly (or annual) feature and portfolio planning, understanding team dependencies is made necessary to identify constraints and avoid overburdening one team. Complexity quickly grows beyond intuition after two or three team dependencies are identified, rendering current forecasting techniques unsatisfactory. This session will discuss the inadequacies of current tools and frameworks used to manage the dependency planning problem, and introduce the choices you have for reducing the complexity and new planning techniques that untangle dependencies into a doable plan.
At the end of the session, attendees will have a new understanding of the complexity team dependencies add to planning, and have a set of strategies and techniques to predictably manage products built in high team-dependency organizations. This session looks at example dependency graphs and graphical matrix techniques that are quick to build and give clear risk insight.
It often shocks organizations to learn mathematically that each team dependency HALVES the chances of an on-time completion of component or delivery. With two dependencies, there is a 1 in 4 chance of no delay; with three dependencies, there is a chance of 1 in 8 delivering on-time. One large legacy application the author worked with had seven dependencies from a core library to a user interface – that is a 1 in 128 chance no team will be delayed (127 times more likely to experience one or more delays). Planning clearly needs to consider how dependencies might impact each teams ability to integrate and build.
It is not as dire as it sounds, not every team suffers the same chance of delay. We look at how to analyze historical examples of delayed work to identify types of features that will encounter dependency delays in the future. Building a map (linked graph) and matrix visualizations of team dependencies gives a basis for examining this historical likelihood of delay and planning team organization structures or staffing plans that compensate. It is possible to predictibly plan in high dependency environments, its just too hard to do in ad-hoc ways.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the impact of multiple team dependencies on planning and scheduling predictability
  • Introduce ways to identify and visualize dependencies for planning
  • Understanding current strengths and weaknesses of dependency management approaches
  • New strategies for minimizing the impact of dependencies and planning cross team capacity
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

14:00

Stalwarts: Luke Hohmann (Luke Hohmann)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Luke Hohmann

Luke Hohmann is the Founder and CEO of Conteneo, Inc. Grounded in the science of play, Conteneo’s enterprise software platforms and professional services merge serious games, data analytics, domain expertise and collaboration to help enterprises optimize decision making in areas of strategy, innovation, sales, product development and market research. Conteneo's games include Innovation Games®, Knowsy® and Strategy Engine. Luke is co-founder of Every Voice Engaged Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that helps citizens and governments tackle technical and wicked social problems. He’s also written four books with long titles and has served on the Board of the Agile Alliance.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.






Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 2

15:45

The Sprint 3 Revolt - How our large scale transformation nearly failed (Raj Mudhar, Jason Alexander)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
At the start of 2014, we cut over 2000+ people at American Express from waterfall to a full agile concept and delivery life cycle. Confidence was high despite the risk. A year of diligent preparation had put all the textbook conditions for success in place: senior leadership was on board; employees were psyched; we had coaches on the ground; a well thought-out agile Software Development Life Cycle; and a continuous integration and delivery infrastructure ready to go. Expectations were managed for the whole organization that the first few sprints for the 40+ scrum teams would be turbulent. Then Sprint Three happened. A revolt erupted across our teams that threatened the whole transformation. The window of opportunity to get it back on track was dwindling. This talk lays out what happened, the five-WHYs behind it, the resolution, and what others can learn from our experience when embarking on a large scale transformation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Transformation Conditions for Success - what every large organization needs to succeed
  • Optimizing the Whole - How failing to look at the bigger picture can spell doom
  • Leadership - the importance of rapid response at the right time
  • Lessons Learned Summary - what you can do to avoid the mistakes we made, and a few things we did right along the way (including building an early warning system)
Attachments:

Speakers
JA

Jason Alexander

Head of Digital Delivery, Chase
Jason recently joined Chase to lead Delivery across the rapidly evolving Digital efforts of the bank. Prior to Chase, Jason led Product Development for Enterprise Growth at American Express. In his four years in Enterprise Growth, he led User Experience, Product Strategy and Planning... Read More →
RM

Raj Mudhar

Deloitte Canada


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 5/6

15:45

Stalwarts: Elisabeth Hendrickson (Elisabeth Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Elizabeth Hendrickson

Elisabeth Hendrickson, better known as testobsessed, has been kicking around the software industry for a couple decades in a variety of roles including tester, developer, and agile enabler. Author of Explore It! from Pragmatic Bookshelf, she is also known for her Google Tech Talk on Agile Testing and popular Test Heuristics Cheatsheet. She won the prestigious Gordon Pask Award from the Agile Alliance in 2010. In 2012 after more than a decade as an independent consultant, she joined Pivotal, the company where she first learned extreme programming. She is now a senior director of engineering.

What is a Stalwarts session?

Stalwarts sessions are built around your questions.

Stalwarts bridges the gap between introductory sessions and advanced sessions, focusing on specific, real-time questions, challenges, dilemmas, and issues that attendees bring to the conference. Experienced agile/lean practitioners - folks who have been in the trenches for many years, who wrote the books, maintained useful blogs, created the methods and approaches, coached the coaches - show up for a focused conversation with you in an open fishbowl format. There will be no prepared slides or talks, just spontaneous dialogue with you about your real challenges and questions.


  • This is what an open fishbowl format looks like and how it works.

  • This session is a 75-minute block, with the following timings:

    • 5-minute introduction with rules and speaker introduction by facilitator and an overview of current area of interest by speaker.

    • 60-minutes for the session - If you have a question, simply join the fishbowl.

    • 10-minute closing by speaker and facilitator.





Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 2
 
Thursday, August 6
 

09:00

Nine Immutable Principles of Lean-Agile Development at Enterprise Scale (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Software is consuming the world. Industries of all types are faced with growing competitive pressures that can be addressed only through more innovative and productive IT operations, software-based systems, products, solutions and services. Many of today's systems are of such complexity that they require hundreds, and even thousands, of practitioners to build.
As always, we, the software development community, have the responsibility to develop and deploy the next generation of practices than deliver better quality, faster. Fortunately, in addition to our traditional experience in building successful systems, we have access to new knowledge pools that can help us address this challenge. These include not only Agile methods, but Lean and Systems Thinking, and Product Development Flow.
In this tutorial, Dean Leffingwell will summarize some of this knowledge into a manageable and memorable set of nine core principles that can be implemented in any software business context. Building on Agile, Lean Systems Thinking and product development flow, the principles are:
• Take an economic view
• Apply systems thinking
• Assume variability; preserve options
• Build incrementally with fast, integrated learning cycles
• Base milestones on objective evaluation of working systems
• Visualize and limit WIP, reduce batch sizes; manage queue lengths.
• Apply cadence; synchronize with cross-domain planning
• Unlock the intrinsic motivation of knowledge workers
• Decentralize decision-making
Understanding and applying these critical principles can unlock significant business benefits, regardless of business context, development frameworks and specific methods of choice.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain an understanding of how these three new bodies of knowledge can be summarized, communicated and applied in a simple and effective way



Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

Chief Methodologist, Scaled Agile, Inc.


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 4/5

09:00

Business Models, Pivots, Architecture and Agility (Jason Tanner)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We can’t always be Agile...And we can’t just change our technical architecture on a dime without considering business model impacts. Likewise, we can’t change the business model without understanding architectural impacts.
This workshop thoroughly examines the linkage between business models, technical architectures, Agility and the implications of change to make faster pivot decisions. Further, this session will explain how business model or architectural changes can constrain Agility.
This session for product owners, product managers, and leaders ventures far beyond backlog prioritization. Through an interactive case study format, attendees will receive a model for understanding the interrelationship between business models and architectures and limitations on Agility. This model will help attendees avoid countless hours grappling with tough decisions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply a business model generation framework.
  • Practice mapping business models to the generation framework.
  • Identify value exchange models and their relationship to architecture.
  • Describe what can and cannot be Agile about business model and architectural changes.
  • Manage architectural change through collaborative roadmapping.
  • Determine how business model change influences product roadmaps.
  • Manage business model change.
  • Describe how product owners and product managers leverage this model to manage backlogs of features and epics.



Speakers
avatar for Jason Tanner

Jason Tanner

CEO, Applied Frameworks, Inc.
Jason Tanner is the CEO of Applied Frameworks, a product management consulting firm. Jason’s passion is coaching people to develop products that customers love. He mentors, teaches, facilitates and sometimes does the work to identify and apply the optimal frameworks for a situation... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10/11

09:00

Value Network Mapping - Raise portfolio performance by balancing demand and supply (Bruce Winegarden)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Participants will learn a proven technique for modeling how to organize development teams while minimizing dependencies and maximizing business responsiveness. Value Network Mapping builds on Lean’s value stream concept by recognizing two orthogonal dimensions; 1) the business value stream for how the business generates value through interactions with customers, plus 2) the delivery value stream from concept, through development and launch. Part one of the session will discuss the concept and advantages of this approach, then participants will do a Value Network Modeling exercise to experience it for themselves.
Value Network Mapping makes it easier to match business demands to the capabilities and capacity of the knowledge worker supply. The traditional view of programs and projects can cause problems when moving to agile techniques because they typically represent both the demand side and supply side of the equation. This coupling makes it more difficult to fund and staff stable, dedicated teams and complicates portfolio capacity planning. This exercise has proven valuable for dozens of companies and is particularly well suited for transaction-oriented businesses such as insurance, financial services, telecom, and retail that rely on an array of different information systems.
This approach overcomes limitations in popular scaling frameworks such as SAFe because it addresses the entire set of work in a software or IT portfolio, and can be used in mixed mode environments where some groups may be agile and others use different development methods.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Split traditional project view to decouple demand and supply
  • Match business demand to the capabilities and capacity of IT supply
  • Reduce dependencies and increase throughput and quality
  • Experience technique for modeling complex IT portfolios
  • Overcome limitations in agile scaling frameworks
Attachments:

Speakers
BW

Bruce Winegarden

Agile Transformation Consultant, Rally Software
Bruce Winegarden combines extensive business experience with Agile and Lean knowledge to transform software and IT organizations. He focuses on adaptive business techniques to overcome the inertia of traditional plan driven approaches and achieve breakthrough results. Bruce has a... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

10:45

An Agile Triple Play: Business Process Re-Engineering meets SOA meets Large Scale Agile (Denis Doelling, Edward Goldgehn)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
This experience report will address the volatility, challenges and solutions implemented within a Fortune 500 Order to Delivery manufacturing program with the goal of re-engineering and aligning global business processes with Web-services and Service Oriented Architecture. The program utilizes large scale agile to manage multi-year planning of incremental releases with delivery of quantifiable business value in each release.
Initially, IT led the program by starting work on initial set of requirements using a waterfall approach. After transitioning to a large scale agile framework and increasing the involvement of the Business, the program continued to attempt delivery using large batches of work driven by annual funding cycles and led to limited delivery of value and significant technical debt. Instead, the program required an iterative and collaborative approach between Business and IT that delivered business value through incremental implementation and adoption of the new technology and processes.
The report will present the techniques used to help put the Business in the driver’s seat of the program through the development of a backlog using the TOGAF SOA Referential Architecture with Large-Scale Agile to define an series of incremental releases. The report will also describe an Agile Design and Elaboration (ADE) framework that was implemented to ensure traceability between the business process design and the production release of business capabilities. This framework facilitates collaborative dialogue between all stakeholders and reinforces an iterative Large-Scale Agile Delivery Lifecycle process. Finally, the report will identify challenges to some of the commonly held agile approaches, such as feature/story authoring and vertical slicing of work when developing business-centric services using a SOA framework for Enterprise modernization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Techniques used to help the business in incremental developing and defining a multi-year production release strategy that will implement the future state of the re-engineered business process.
  • Techniques used to guide the collaborative development of a multi-year production release strategy that will incrementally deliver value.
  • Techniques used to drive the development of an architectural roadmap to support a multi-year production release strategy while balancing team driven design with intentional Service Oriented Architecture using a large-scale Agile practices framework.


Speakers
avatar for Denis Doelling

Denis Doelling

Agile coach, Cognizant Technology Solution
For many years I have been working in an agile manner and helping project teams and clients to do the same regardless of the maturity of their practices. I would like to discuss how others have approached the adoption of Agile thinking in organizations and how to deal with the cultural... Read More →
avatar for Edward Goldgehn

Edward Goldgehn

Associate Director - Principal Architect, Cognizant Technology Solutions
Mr. Goldgehn has more than 25 years of solutions architecture, pre-sales technical consulting, business process management and re-engineering, content management and technical project management experience in a wide variety of industries. Mr. Goldgehn has extensive expertise in the... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Potomac 4

10:45

Outcome Driven Organizations (ODO): A new operating system for organizational change (Skip Angel, Richard Watt)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Over the last 15 years Agile has moved beyond a grassroots effort to a mainstream approach taken by organizations in hopes of transforming the way they think, work and deliver solutions. Despite some success adopting specific practices like Scrum and Kanban, there aren't many published stories of measurable and sustainable long-term success by organizations. How many companies that adopted Agile practices in the early days are still doing it today? If the lack of published Agile case studies is any indication, we haven’t had a great track record.
As coaches, we have worked with enough companies to realize that there is something missing in the way we lead and execute Agile transformations. We can't continue to take a haphazard approach to change where we might get lucky and stumble on to something that works. It also can't be something in which we throw a lot of change at once and expect everything to stick and be sustainable. Agile has great potential but we have only touched the surface of what it could do for organizations. We need a different way of tapping into that potential.
We are excited to introduce a new approach to organizational change. It starts with the end in mind, those outcomes that we can measure and desire for our organization. With strong alignment and a clearly defined purpose, we begin to define small incremental and controlled experiments. Through these improvements, we will develop the capabilities and behaviors needed to not only improve short-term performance but to ensure long-lasting resilience.
During the session, you will explore the details of this approach with us and learn ways to apply to your organizational change efforts. It's time we had better stories of how companies have succeeded by executing against better outcomes, and finally reaping all of the benefits promised by Agile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize the challenges you may be having in your organization against patterns we have seen in our companies adopting and scaling Agile
  • Understand the capabilities and behaviors needed for your company to achieve the best outcomes
  • Determine where your organization may be in its journey for agility using an Capability Health Check
  • Learn about how to set up an organizational change process that will help you sense and adapt towards a specific purpose
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Skip Angel

Skip Angel

Chief Pathfinder, CA Technologies
I have over 25 years of experience in software development in a variety of roles such as Developer, Project Manager, Consultant and Chief Technology Officer. Over the last 7 years, I have provided thought leadership, training and coaching to new and experienced teams interested in... Read More →
RW

Richard Watt

Mr., GE HealthCare
Richard is a proven Technology Director with a record of successfully leading and coaching business and technology teams in the delivery of first-class solutions. He is a recognized leader in the field of Agile Software Development with over 20 years of experience in organizational... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

10:45

Visual Testing: It’s Not What You Look At, It’s What You See (MIke Lyles)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
How many times have you driven all the way home, only to realize you didn’t remember anything from the drive. Your mind was in a different place, and you were driving on autopilot. Or maybe you walk out to your garage and get in your car every day and are so used to the surroundings that you don’t notice that something has been taken or moved to a new location. When our eyes are so familiar with the things we see every day, our brains are tricked into believing that there is nothing that has changed.
In the popular TV show, “Brain Games”, we find many exercises where you, the audience, are asked to pay attention and focus on what is happening. That simple focused attention gets the majority of people in trouble, because the art of focusing on a specific area or activity prohibits the audience from seeing things that are going on around them. This “inattentional blindness” causes key details to be missed. Your brain is the most complex tool that you will ever have in your possession. However, with a highly complex tool comes the need to ensure that it is used appropriately and to its full potential.
In the testing profession, such focused concentration, leading to “inattentional blindness” can be detrimental to the success of the product being delivered. As testers, we must find a way to constantly challenge our visual images and prohibit our brain from accepting that there are no changes which could impact the quality of the product. It is critical to be aware of the entire surroundings of the testing activity and to be able to recognize and call out changes that may be easily overlooked without an attention to detail.
In this session, Mike Lyles will challenge the audience to literally “think outside the box”. The audience will be given specific exercises to show how that the human mind sometimes overlooks details when they seem visually insignificant or unrelated. We will examine how testers can become better prepared for such oversights and discuss strategies that can be used immediately in your organizations. The key to eliminating the risk of oversight and missed problems is learning how to identify the areas where you may have originally ignored a focused effort.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Key Takeaways:
  • • An understanding that no matter how good we believe we are as testers, we have to realize that there is the possibility of being so familiar with a product that our eyes do not notice changes that sneak in.
  • • Tips to recognizing patterns and potential gaps that many visual testing activities may miss.
  • • Techniques that can be used in becoming a better visual tester.



Speakers
avatar for Mike Lyles

Mike Lyles

Director of QA and Project Management, Bridgetree
Mike Lyles is a Director of QA and Project Management with 25+ years of IT experience in multiple large organizations. He has held various leadership roles: software development, PMO, and software testing. He has led various teams within testing: Functional, Environments, SCM, TDM... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 13

15:45

How to SWITCH to Agile in the Federal Landscape (James Barclay, Jon Ruark)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The White House has recognized the need for change in the federal government in order to efficiently address advancing technologies and to deliver value to customers by taking advantage of those new technologies. This modernization in the way the government develops software will provide efficiencies in the long term. The effort to realize those efficiencies will require a significant shift in culture from traditional waterfall development to a culture of agile development; which will result in saving time, resources, and most importantly, delivering value to the end- user.
Our agency has been in the process of transitioning away from the traditional waterfall development for the past 24 months. In our experience, the adoption of agile is not as simple as choosing a framework and immediately executing it. The challenges we face are not inconsequential and need to be addressed. These challenges include:
• Shifting toward a culture of urgency, accountability, and value
• Servant leadership & management support
• Change management
• Lean-Agile budgeting and estimation
• The dangers of up-front requirements
• Participation and collaboration in traditionally stove-piped organizations
As is described in the book “Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard,” knowledge is not enough to change behavior. Therefore, knowledge alone of an agile framework is not enough to transition away from a deep seeded foundation of inefficiencies and bureaucratic behavior. Agile is a new destination, and you need to determine how you are going to reach that destination. It is as if you have a vehicle, a map, and the organizational challenge to convince everyone that the trip is worth the effort. Understanding the inherent challenges within the government, communicating those challenges, and sharing those experiences and results, are all part of that journey.
OCC Approved 2-19-2015 C15-234
Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this presentation, the audience will:
  • Be able to identify near-term, end-state, and transitional activities to ensure a successful transition to Agile
  • Gain knowledge from the presenter’s past experiences navigating the governmental landscape
  • Gain additional insight into where the federal government is heading and how to support it in its transition
  • Have key takeaways to ensure that not only the logical needs, but more importantly the emotional needs of government leaders and practitioners are addressed
  • Learn that “Being Agile” is not the same as transitioning to an agile enterprise
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for James Barclay

James Barclay

Sr. System Engineer, NGA
avatar for Jon Ruark

Jon Ruark

Director of Strategic Operations, TRIAEM LLC
SPC, CSPO. I'm a fan of Agile values for everything. Ask me how you can do anything using Agile!


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

Advanced Discussion of StoryPoints for Project Management (Dan Rawsthorne, PhD, PMP)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We know that StoryPoints are "a relative measure of size that can be applied to Stories and Epics." Beyond this simple statement there is not much about StoryPoints that we can all agree on - teams and organizations are free to estimate and use StoryPoints as they see fit. Well, I want to use them to aid in Project (not Sprint) Management, and in this talk I present a way to define StoryPoints for this purpose. Come and hear words like "Ideal Effort", "Intrinsic Difficulty", "Function Points", and "Earned Value", and how StoryPoints become the basic currency for Release budgeting and metrics.
Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding that StoryPoints are not a trivial matter.
  • An understanding of what StoryPoints need to look like to make them useful for Project Management
Attachments:


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac D

15:45

Governance, Phases, and Milestones, are not Agile Dirty Words! (Mark Lines)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Despite claims to the contrary, the need for governance does not disappear for agile projects. Your project sponsors have a right to know the status of the health and risk of their investments. But trying to blend traditional agile methods such as Scrum with traditional stage gate approaches can cause frustration for both project teams and their stakeholders. Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) provides straightforward and common sense ideas for applying governance in a lightweight fashion for agile projects. DAD has been adopted organization-wide in some very large companies and in many cases the primary motivations have been related to its hybrid method approach as well as the built-in governance that it provides.
In this talk Mark reviews the four DAD lifecycles along with their associated phases and milestones. He will explain which milestones are highly recommended vs those that are considered optional. He will show how a lightweight Vision statement created in Inception can be used as a governance mechanism for moderating uncontrolled change that often happens on agile projects.
Mark will share stories and tips about how to effectively apply these concepts to avoid late projects surprises. He will also review several examples of applying DAD governance such as how DAD was used to bridge the governance gap between an organization's Scrum teams and their corporate mandate of using PRINCE2.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the mismatch between traditional and agile governance expectations
  • Learn the four DAD lifecycles that support various approaches such as agile, lean, and continuous delivery
  • Understand why DAD has phases and why they are valuable
  • Learn the value of DAD's Vision statement as a mechanism for good governance
  • Learn about the DAD milestones as well as where and when to apply them
  • How to enhance your end of iteration demos to incorporate lightweight milestone reviews
  • Contrast traditional governance metrics with some suggestions that are more applicable for agile projects



Speakers
avatar for Mark Lines

Mark Lines

Managing Partner & Agile Coach, Scott Ambler + Associates
Mark is an Enterprise Agile Coach, change agent, and co-creator of the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) framework. With Scott Ambler, he is co-author of Disciplined Agile Delivery: A Practitioner's Guide to Agile Software Delivery in the Enterprise. He helps organizations all over... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 5/6
 
Friday, August 7
 

09:00

Scaling Agile with Open Space (Daniel Mezick)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Open Space gatherings arranged inside organizations are totally unlike the Open Space events you may be familiar with during public conferences. As described in the book SPIRIT from Harrison Owen, Open Space is actually designed to enable development and transformations in organizations. This session is about how to leverage Open Space to scale Agile across the enterprise.
At the root of effective Agile is the self-managed team...a self-organizing system. At the core of Open Space is the power of self-organization. In this sense, effective Agile adoptions and Open Space are very, very similar.
During this session I will present narratives, pictures, videos and testimony from C-level people as well as team members. Each will describe how Open Space inside their Agile adoption literally changed their lives. Of particular interest are the stories executives tell about how they learned to let go and trust their people to provide everything the Agile adoption needed to succeed at scale.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to apply Open Space for ensuring effective Agile adoptions
  • Understand how to bring executives into the self-managed world of Agile and Open Space
  • Gain knowledge of at least 7 experience reports detailing various approaches, tools and techniques



Speakers

Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10/11

09:00

Spine Model - A systemic approach to effective leadership (Kevin Trethewey, Danie Roux)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Great people, great ideas, great work environment. Often all the ingredients are there, but somehow there always seems to be fires to put out, misunderstanding to smooth over, damage to be undone.
Being an effective leader is hard when there is just so much to be done all the time.
As a leader in an organisation you are only effective when there is a shared perception of the way things currently are and productive debate on the way they should be. An effective leader makes it clear where the boundaries are and empowers people to make choices within them. Without an effective mental model of your work system that is easily shared with others this becomes an intractable problem that consumes your energy as well as that of all those who look to you for direction.
The Spine Model is a systemic approach to mapping a work system that will enable you to be a more effective leader. It provides an explicit way to determine your responsibilities as a leader and those that should be delegated to the people doing the work. It shows how and where to place enabling constraints into a work system that will allow the people most familiar with the current local context to decide how that work should be done.
The Spine Model has emerged from our coaching through necessity rather than intent. We have been applying and refining it for some time and, recently, teaching it to others. We have found that it meets a large need, particularly for people that have started to move beyond basics of Scrum and Agile practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Create and maintain a shared perception of how things are, and why.
  • Lift conversations to an effective level, breaking agreement deadlocks.
  • As a leader, place enabling constraints into the system and know when to intervene effectively.



Speakers
avatar for Danie Roux

Danie Roux

Danie Roux Consulting
People person, change agent. Journeyer through problem and solution space. Interested in being interested. I consult on the Why and How of Value creation.
avatar for Kevin Trethewey

Kevin Trethewey

Founder, Driven Alliance
Over the course of my career I have had the opportunity to work in and observe projects, teams and organisations in vastly different environments, and seen vastly differing levels of success amongst them. Through my experiences I have grown an understanding of the values, principles... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 4/5

09:00

Achieving transformational agility through enterprise architecture - a Cisco case study (Gustav Toppenberg)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Most industries in today’s competitive environment are undergoing some level of business transformation to evolve its value and impact. As organizational leaders look to continue to differentiate their companies from those in the marketplace they plan transformational efforts to build or maintain competitive advantages.
Change initiatives are time consuming and costly, significantly impacting an organization’s drive toward success and nearly half of them fail. In the face of mounting pressures to continue to deliver value fast, organizations are looking to agile practices and principles to generate the needed speed to deliver solutions to the marketplace faster than their competitors.
Agile practitioners will not be surprised to learn that while 82% of Fortune 500 CEO's feel their organization did an effective job of strategic planning. Only 14% of the same CEO's indicated that their organization did an effective job of implementing the strategy.
Change and transformation is unavoidable, organizations need to resolve how to successfully adapt and sustain change, bridging the gap between strategic intent and execution to deliver the intended value.
In this session, Gustav Toppenberg will share how Cisco Systems is implementing ‘delivery transformation’, a combination of Agile Development and Continuous Delivery practices and principles to ensure the speed of value delivery is faster than the pace of its competitors. As the head of enterprise architecture operations in Cisco IT, Gustav will share how in the face of the need to change the pace Cisco has changed the role of enterprise architecture and portfolio management, capabilities that spans beyond IT & technology to business and operating models, to enable a succinct and coordinated approach to enable the execution teams to ensure their work is tied directly to strategic intent.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The presenter will share the Cisco ‘Architecture-led Investment Planning’ process utilized at Cisco pausing to show specific examples of how the EA and the Portfolio Mgmt. capabilities have changed to be useful and enabling for agile delivery teams. The examples will include the connection of architectural roadmaps, investment planning and the transfer of architectural decision to agile teams.
  • Participants will have real-life examples of the challenges and benefits Cisco is seeing from this transformation. They will also see first-hand the roles and responsibilities architects, agile team members and others in Cisco IT have that make the transformation possible.



Speakers
GT

Gustav Toppenberg

Head of Enterprise Architecture Operations, Cisco Systems, Inc.
A goal-oriented, insightful and seasoned strategic leader & transformation agent, with 14+ years of experience in start-up, high-growth and fortune 100 companies. Extensive experience building & leading transformational efforts for both small & global operations. A strong track record... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 12

10:45

Want Better Collaboration? Don't be so Defensive! (James Tamm)
Abstract:
Jim's keynote will challenge you to look at yourself through self-critical eyes. Entitled "Want Better Collaboration? Don't be so Defensive!", Jim will discuss skills essential for effective collaboration. In particular, he will focus on achieving success even during difficult interactions. He will show how your own defensiveness is a key factor in resolving conflicts and building collaboration. He will share practical tools designed to help you manage your own defensiveness.
For most of his career, Jim was a Senior Administrative Law Judge for the State of California. He had jurisdiction over public sector disputes in the workplace. He mediated over 1,500 labor disputes, including more school district labor strikes than any other person in the United States. For several years he was a member of a collaboration special task force. They designed and taught collaboration skills to highly conflicted public sector organizations. The project was wildly successful. It helped build trust, reduce conflict and create more collaborative working environments.
Jim is President of RC Group, LLC. He maintains offices in South San Francisco, California, Cuernavaca, Mexico and Stockholm, Sweden. He specializes in building cultures of collaboration within organizations. He also trains other consultants and trainers how to teach collaborative skills.
Learning Outcomes:
  • .
Attachments:

Speakers

Friday August 7, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac A/B