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Learning [clear filter]
Sunday, August 2
 

15:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Get the most out of Agile2015 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2015, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Sunday August 2, 2015 15:15 - 15:45
Potomac 1/2/3

18:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Get the most out of Agile2015 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2015, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.





Sunday August 2, 2015 18:15 - 18:45
Potomac 1/2/3
 
Monday, August 3
 

08:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Get the most out of Agile2015 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2015, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.





Monday August 3, 2015 08:15 - 08:45
Potomac 1/2/3

10:45

Tribal Leadership for Agile Teams (Steffan Surdek)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The book Tribal Leadership introduces five stages that represent a range of behaviors that tribes (ie.: groups of 20 or more people) act and think together. These stages range from Stage 1 where "Life Sucks!" to Stage 5 where "Life is Great!". Most software development teams (and most workplaces) live in the three stages in between.
This talk takes group development model presented in Tribal Leadership and helps coaches, scrum masters, team leaders and managers better understand some of the behaviors they may see every day in their agile software development teams. Participants will experience and explore the stages in various ways such as through music and an interactive game called "Guess that Tribal Stage".
"Steffan's work really brings together the worlds of Tribal Leadership and Agile software development in an interesting way. I think highly of him and how he brings these worlds together in a clear and simple way."
Dave Logan, co-author of the NY Times best-selling book Tribal Leadership
Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this talk, the participants will be able to:
  • * Identify the five cultural stages through language and relationship structures
  • * Recognize the dominant cultural stage in their teams
  • * Use a basic tool set to help team members evolve through the stages
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steffan Surdek

Steffan Surdek

Senior consultant, Pyxis Technologies
Steffan Surdek is an organizational coach and trainer at Pyxis Technologies. As a coach, he strives to create engaged teams led by inspiring and empowering leaders for the sake of making the software development workplace fun again. Mr. Surdek has worked in IT for over 20 years in... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 4/5

10:45

Improvisssssing With Agile (Paul Goddard)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Collaboration is considered a fundamental part of "being agile" but how can you help your team understand HOW to collaborate? "Improvising" is not really about being funny, or panicking when things go wrong. It's a simple process that groups of actors follow in order to create interesting stories and scenes without the aid of a script. This session will show how the five 'secrets' of improvisational theatre can support an agile team's growth and also give you some practical guidance on how to get your team's collaborative and creative juices flowing from the very start!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees have learned some basic agile principles around collaboration and listening
  • Attendees have learned how to run some basic improv games in their own teams
  • Attendees have a five principles to summarise the ethos of improvisational theatre
  • Attendees have realised how collaboration and creativity come hand-in-hand
  • Attendees have had some fun and made some new friends
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Goddard

Paul Goddard

Agilify


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 5/6

10:45

Old Code, New Tricks (Scott Ford)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
For most developers, the majority of their day involves interacting with code that someone else wrote. Working with legacy code is almost inevitable in today's development landscape, yet most of us have a negative outlook on working with existing codebases. This negativity is baked into the language we use. We work on 'legacy projects', 'dirt field projects', 'rescue projects', 'antiquated projects', 'ancient projects', while newer projects get labeled as 'greenfield' and 'blue sky'. In this talk, M. Scott Ford, Founder and Chief Code Whisperer at Corgibytes, a consultancy that specializes in working on legacy projects, shares his perspective on how you can learn to not only tolerate, but appreciate what he calls 'software remodeling'. You’ll walk away with specific techniques for working with older codebases, a new vocabulary to describe existing projects, and a framework for determining when you should re-write versus improve your project.
Learning Outcomes:
  • For most developers, the majority of their day involves interacting with code that someone else wrote. Working with legacy code is almost inevitable in todays development landscape, yet most of us have a very negative outlook on working with existing codebases. In this talk, M. Scott Ford, Founder and Chief Code Whisperer at Corgibytes, a consultancy that specializes in working on legacy projects, shares his perspective on how you can learn to not only tolerate, but appreciate what he calls “software remodeling.” You’ll walk away with:
  • •Specific techniques for working with older codebases
  • •New vocabulary to describe existing projects
  • •A framework for determining when you should re-write versus improve your project
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 8

10:45

The Magic Carpet Ride: A Business Perspective on DevOps (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Having problems convincing your stakeholders to try DevOps? Confused about how DevOps can work at scale? Or even just wondering where to start with DevOps? Don’t worry you aren’t the only one!
Imagine being the business owner of an application that was the complete antithesis of Continuous Delivery i.e. no delivery ever! Ok that might be a slight exaggeration. Let’s just say the realisation of benefits from projects developed on this application were few and far between.
You are presented with Agile - a silver bullet - and you wait, and you wait and you wait, but the magic doesn’t happen. Eventually someone starts a conversation about “agile technical practices”, finally you know the spell to cast to make the magic carpet fly, or so you would think…..
If you want to hear the rest of the story you will just have attend this session. Set in the context of an Enterprise Data Warehouse, this session will tell the story of how a scaled agile adoption created the case for change and subsequent implementation of DevOps practices. This tale from the trenches will provide insights into both the mistakes made along the way and the ideas that made all the difference, in completely transforming the delivery capability of the organisation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Techniques for getting business buy-in to DevOps initiatives.
  • Approaches for funding DevOps initiatives.
  • Pitfalls to avoid when implementing DevOps.
  • Success factors likely to enable success with DevOps.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Managing Director, Pretty Agile


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 6/7

10:45

A (Story Map) is worth a thousand words (Elliot Susel)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Manage project scope from ideation to delivery by using a story map. They’re quick to make, easy to maintain, and perfect for explaining your project to others. Elliot will introduce the fundamentals, and then we’ll break off into teams to build your first story map. You’ll leave with the core concepts, resources for further study, and a killer tool to communicate your product vision.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Ability to articulate when and why you use a story map
  • Ability to create your own story maps
  • Methods for using story maps throughout delivery lifecycle to manage and communicate project scope
  • Methods for using story maps to convey level of effort
  • Methods for using story maps to plan iteration themes, and support cross-team coordination
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Elliot Susel

Elliot Susel

Head of R&D, Paid Services, AOL
Elliot Susel is the Head of R&D for Paid Services at AOL, where he is growing a team that performs lean startup-style concept validation and agile delivery for innovation projects.Prior to this role Elliot was the Acting VP of Technology at the Alexandria-based technology startup... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 13

14:00

Facilitating Operational Retrospectives: 'postmortems' minus the blame (J. Paul Reed)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As organizations experience with greater concurrency and integration between their departments and move toward a continuous delivery of customer-value, failure is assured. Asking "how can failure be avoided?" isn't as useful or relevant as focusing on
  • "How does our organization react when failure occurs?" and
  • "How do we create a sustainable, actionable process for describing, exploring, and remedying failure?"
Of course, retrospectives are not new to the Agile community. But are the "end of sprint" retrospectives we know and love enough?
As organizations integrate the work being done under the "DevOps umbrella" into their Agile practices, the need for a new type of retrospective becomes obvious: the operational retrospective. (Many operations teams know this as the "post-outage postmortem.")
An operational retrospective has a number of important differences from end-of-sprint retrospectives:
  • Events can prompt them at any time, even multiple times per day in large enterprises.
  • These events can generate a lot of data for review.
  • Because they are prompted by performance problems and outages, they are often high pressure situations.
  • Unlike our team retrospectives, many different actors become involved, as cross-functional engineers swarm on problems and leadership demands to know "Why?"
Altogether, this can create a breeding ground for finger-pointing, bias, and a host of other behaviors which destroys our ability to learn anything useful from the event.
But it doesn't have to be this way.
We'll examine the current thinking on organizational and technological failure and look at tools and techniques used by other industries (transportation, construction, manufacturing) to conduct their postmortems. We'll also look at the cognitive biases that often find their way into a postmortem process and why it's important to be aware of them when conducting our own operational retrospectives.
We'll finish by looking at techniques to conduct postmortems within your own organizations, both from a process/skill perspective and from a tooling perspective, to help ensure that the results of your postmortems are incorporated back into the organization's shared knowledge for the next time there's an issue with production, not just stored on some wiki somewhere that no one remembers to look at again.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe existing models for postmortem/retrospective analysis
  • Describe the "New View" model of postmortems/operational retrospectives
  • Recognize bias (situational and social) and how they impact the retrospective process
  • Employ different linguistic structures for postmortem analysis
  • Compare/contrast other industries' postmortem structure and processes and be able to select techniques relevant to their Operations-focused postmortems
  • Familiarity with tools that facilitate the operational retrospective process and how they improve the organization's ability to act on the findings, learn, and improve



Speakers
avatar for J. Paul Reed

J. Paul Reed

Managing Partner, Release Engineering Approaches
J. Paul Reed has over fifteen years experience in the trenches as a build/release engineer, working with such storied companies as VMware, Mozilla, Postbox, Symantec, and Salesforce. In 2012, he founded Release Engineering Approaches, a consultancy incorporating a host of tools... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

Games Gone Wild (William Krebs)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Enterprise Gamification. Does that sound like a contradiction in terms? It turns out we can learn a lot from the gaming culture. Gamers come together to collaborate, communicate, and optimize team performance based on metrics. What do they do that would make us better at managing our Agile Projects?
In this talk we will frame the context of 'Serious Games' such as Lego(R) for Serious Play(R), Innovation Games(R), simulations, open environments, and Gamification concepts of points, badges, and leader boards. These concepts are used both in training and operation in a variety of themes - some more creative, some more subtle and serious.
Join AgileBill as he shares what he has studied in two Master's degree programs on how core elements of gaming concepts can improve teamwork, training, and innovation for you and your group.
Learning Outcomes:
  • After attending this talk attendees will be able to
  • 1) List categories of games, examples in each category, and their potential uses.
  • 2) Compare and critique games in key categories such as platforms, open play, structured games, simulations, and gamification, online, and face to face.
  • 3) Relate the games to educational theories that support their effectiveness
  • 4) Use a game for Agile training
  • 5) Judge situations where some game formats will not work.
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac D

14:00

Consensus That 'Sticks' (Jeremy Kriegel)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
An important aspect of your role on a team is facilitating large and often very different groups of people. We may be generating ideas, gathering information, processing ideas, or collecting feedback. Each person has something important to contribute and the success of the project is likely related to how successfully these interactions are facilitated.
In this intense workshop, you will use variations on simple techniques that will help you extract the maximum knowledge of your participants in a democratic way that will make sure everyone feels like they had a voice in the outcome. You will work through a number of different kinds of problems with a small team. You'll brainstorm using open-ended affinity mapping, and experiment with structured mapping to answer specific questions. You'll reorganize and prioritize. In short order, you'll have a clear consensus among the group that you can act on.
Whether you are an experienced facilitator or just starting to find yourself responsible for corralling a team of stakeholders, you will benefit from this workshop. Newer practitioners will learn a new tool that you can add to your practice and experienced practitioners will get some variations and polishing techniques to improve the use of this tool in your practice.
By the end of this session, you'll have the ability to identify which combinations of techniques will be useful for whatever problems your team is facing and have the confidence to lead them through the exercise. Once you are familiar with these techniques, you will find that they are very easy to deploy with little or no advanced preparation. All you need is a surface and a pad of sticky notes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the value of broad engagement for certain decisions
  • Understand the difference between collaborative idea generation and individual idea generation and when to use each
  • Understand the difference between structured and unstructured organization and when to use each
  • Experience with multiple combinations of each variant
  • Ability to lead the exercise themselves with their own teams



Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Director, Audible
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 20+ years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

Liven Up Agile Learning with Code Jams (Sondra Ashmore, Jodi Jones)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
One of the biggest challenges for organizations who would like to start adopting more Agile methodologies is helping their staff (and leadership) get past the uncertainty of working in a new way and embracing cultural changes. Leaders direct them to classes, books, blogs, and conferences and yet they still are not sure what steps they need to take first or what success will look like for them. Failing fast and frequently does not sound like a positive proposition to them. After all, most leaders expect them to try it out for the first time on a project that will have a direct impact on their yearly rating and salary.
What if they could try it out on a real project that benefits their business, encourages innovation, while also providing a safe environment? Sound too good to be true . . . it’s not. At the Principal Financial Group we introduced Agile methods by introducing code jams (similar in nature to hackathons) both company wide and on individual teams that were one to three days in duration. The code jams provided a platform for them to try out some of the basic Agile methods such as Scrum, XP, and Kanban that ultimately gave them a better understanding of the terminology and value that the new methods provided.
In this session we will share how you can use code jams as an Agile education tool in your organization. We will share our lessons learned on selling the idea of code jams to upper management, describe the anatomy of a code jam, and provide ideas on how to sprinkle Agile learning opportunities into these fun and innovative events.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Introducing Agile methods in your organization in a fun and approachable format
  • Action learning
  • Encouraging Agile adoption in a traditional Waterfall organization
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sondra Ashmore

Sondra Ashmore

IT Assistant Director, Principal Financial Group
avatar for Jodi Jones

Jodi Jones

Assistant Director - IT, Principal Financial Group


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 16:15
Potomac 4

15:45

Drive: How we used Daniel Pink’s work to create a happier, more motivated workplace (David Mole)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you inspired and happy in your work? Do you feel motivated to give your best every single day? Inspired by Daniel Pink, we delved into the research of what actually motivates people and can now tell you the intriguing story of what we learned and how we were able to create a significantly happier, more productive, motivated workplace by focusing on Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose - the key concepts made famous by the book Drive (and the associated TED talk and online video clips).
Through a combination of research, coaching and lots of trial and error we made a range of changes to the way we worked and to our environment. Proudly, we were able to significantly increase happiness and in turn directly impact the productivity of our Agile teams (although the happiness spread into the wider workplace too!). Of course not everything worked and you will hear about the strategies that triumphed and those that (sometimes spectacularly) flopped! After hearing this talk, you will not only be able to understand what we did and why but you will also take away techniques and ideas for experiments that you can try for yourself.
Debunking stubborn workplace myths along the way, we can also demonstrate exactly what happens to an organisation when you focus on happiness and motivation as your key measures and all the other KPI’s take a backseat. Importantly this is about much more than the theory, yes we will cover that along the way, but we will also tell the story of how we have been able to strategically improve happiness and productivity at one of New Zealand’s largest organisations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The audience will:
  • - Understand the key concepts which sit behind happiness and motivation at work
  • - Understand why old fashioned thinking and myths no longer apply in the modern workplace
  • - Take away ideas and techniques for measuring happiness and understand which ones may be most applicable at their organisation.
  • - Identify and understand the overlap between happiness, motivation and Agile the principles.
  • - Understand the link between happiness and productivity with strategies for influencing both.
  • - Hear a real story of how this work has been applied at one of New Zealand's most well known businesses.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Mole

David Mole

Agile Coach, Nomad8
After speaking about Self-Selecting teams at last year's conference, this year I will be speaking about how we used Daniel Pink's work around Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose to create happier more motivated teams. @Molio https://nz.linkedin.com/in/davidmole


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13

15:45

Launching MSN on Azure a Story of the 76 point checklist (Eric Passmore)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Get specific and learn twelve categories and 76 points to make any cloud service successful. Cloud services on commodity hardware are less resilient and fail more often requiring more work to build a rugged and responsive system. This checklist is the recipe that will turn any dev team into devops superstars.
As a bonus hear first hand stories of moving Microsoft's MSN service of 450 million users to Azure. Stories that will make you laugh and cry!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the specific check list to make any cloud service successful.
Attachments:

Speakers
EP

Eric Passmore

CTO MSN, Microsoft
Eric is passionate about coaching and mentoring people to be better technical leaders. He has experience leading software teams in a diverse set of cultures across Microsoft, AOL, CNET, and a few startups. During that time Eric has build global online applications supporting hundreds... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

Games for Learning about Conflict Resolution (Ellen Grove)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Conflict isn’t inherently a bad thing – it’s inevitable when people are working closely together on things that they care about. In fact, diverging viewpoints can bring new insights to help teams move forward and create something new. Dealing with conflict head-on is challenging for many people, yet few teams spend time explicitly considering “how will we work together when things get rocky?” Teams need to build the skills to be able to navigate through rough times together and come out with win-win solutions.
This workshop will present useful models for considering team conflicts supported by games teams can use to develop and practice conflict resolution skills. The models address underlying drivers of conflict, modes for responding to conflict, assessing conflict severity to determine appropriate interventions, and the patterns of principled negotiation. The games build on the concepts to help participants gain insight and develop important skills in a non-intimidating and memorable way.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding our own beliefs about and reactions to conflict
  • A useful model for identifying the drivers underlying conflict
  • A pattern for constructive conflict resolution based on principled negotiation
  • Games that can use with your teams to develop conflict management and resolution skills
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Grove

Ellen Grove

business agility coach, Agile Partnership
Ellen Grove is an Agile coach and trainer who helps teams to do better work by coaching them to cocreate the circumstances in which they can work productively and effectively. Her Agile coaching practice is founded in over 18 years’ experience leading software testing, development... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

09:00

Create Influence, On Demand (Bernie Maloney)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Want Jedi like leadership?
Come grasp why Agile teams communicate 5x+ more effectively and the underlying principles you can use to
Create Influence, On Demand
From addressing resistance to change to instilling self-direction in teams, Agile relies on Influence rather than Authority. Agile practices like co-location and standups actually amplify influence by leveraging behavior patterns built in to humans through biology and social conditions. This workshop teases apart those patterns, turning them into conscious tools for leadership through influence. Exercises take participants through the application and practice of techniques to lower resistance to communication, whether face to face or over a phone. This session is ideal for anyone seeking to tap the latent genius present in the people, teams and businesses with whom they work in order to accelerate the arrival of high performance.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will
  • • Grasp the full power of practices like standups, co-location and task boards, and how each leverages communication programming built-in to human beings
  • • Amplify their ability to influence by quickly establishing Rapport
  • • Understand How to build Rapport with both Voice and Physiology
  • • Understand How to use Rapport to Pace and Lead Teams and Individuals
  • • Practice building Rapport, as well as breaking it (helpful when pulling discussions out of ratholes)
  • • Be able to immediately apply these techniques, even when constrained to no more than a telephone call
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bernie Maloney

Bernie Maloney

Agile Coach | Accelerating Genius, Persistent Systems
Bernie’s career started with a flash and a bang. Literally. His first position was designing devices that protect telephone networks from lightning strikes. A few career pivots later, he had a flash of insight: it was possible to tap into latent potential in every person, every... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 3

09:00

Being Agile: Having the Mind-set that Delivers (Gil Broza)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you excited about adopting Agile? Have you put in place the roles, artifacts, meetings, tools, lingo, and teams? Are you then realizing the promised benefits -- happy customers, quality product, reliable delivery teams, faster releases?
Would you honestly answer "yes"? Or would your answer really be "only some of the benefits," "inconsistently," or "we did, initially"? If so, you're not alone. In most organizations, these results are due to an Agile implementation that is mechanical, rigid, and driven by tools and so-called "best practices." But Agile is much more than a process; it’s first and foremost a mind-set that permeates your actions. Without the mind-set, you cannot achieve and sustain great results.
In this talk, Gil Broza will guide you through the values, beliefs, and principles that define Agile thinking. You’ll learn how to choose Agile-minded methods, process, and practices for your needs and context. And with the deep understanding of what makes Agile work, you’ll be able to support mindful implementation and the necessary culture change.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain clarity on the values, beliefs, and principles that define Agile thinking
  • Learn how to choose Agile-minded methods, process, and practices for your needs and context
  • Support mindful implementation and the necessary culture change
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gil Broza

Gil Broza

Agile Mindset Coach and Trainer, 3P Vantage, Inc.
Gil Broza can help you increase organizational agility and team performance with minimal risk and thrashing. Dozens of companies seeking transformations, makeovers, or improvements have relied on his pragmatic, modern, and respectful support for customizing Agile in their contexts... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10/11

09:00

Reflections on an 18-Month Federal DevOps Transformation (Dan Craig)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Eighteen months ago my company was asked to serve as the primary change agent during the transformation of a large, civilian agency towards agile/CD/DevOps practices. During the sales cycle our early impressions of the the client were fantastic: they had experience with agile delivery; a CIO with a history of IT innovation; leadership that already worked well with each other and a large, highly-visible NextGen effort making everyone eager to embrace any practices that could make them more efficient. What could go wrong? We learned that even under the most favorable circumstances, enterprise-wide change is not easy. It takes significant commitment from leadership and a willingness to continually revisit the people, processes and tools involved with delivering software.
This talk provides brief background on the state of the organization when we first engaged, and highlights the major successes (and growing pains!) we encountered while building an agile/CD platform, on-boarding over 100 projects and moving the agency up the DevOps maturity curve:
The Backdrop…
• Pressure to Deliver Suite of NextGen Applications
• Highly Visible Legacy Blow-Ups (CM, Deployment)
• Infrastructure & Networking issues
• Various methodologies/technologies
• No central source for CM, Development, Test or Deployment of Systems
• No shared priorities=organizational conflict
Building the Platform…
• Introducing Open-Source & Retiring Expensive Licensed Products
• Integrating Agency Tools (Selenium, LoadRunner, WebInspect…)
• Networking Considerations (DNS Names, Publicly Accessible)
• Standardizing Environments
• Moving towards the Cloud
Creating the “Platform Playbook”…
• Platform Onboarding & Project Maturation Process
• Inter-Organization Touch-points
• Piloting Migrations to the Platform
• Refactoring Process at we Learn
Shoring Up Agile Practices…
• Agile Assessments/Metrics
• Tailored Best Practices, Standards
• Training
• Codified Enforcement of Standards
• Automated Builds
Aligning the Organization…
• Ensuring Shared Priorities
o Quarterly CIO Summit (Roadmap)
o Monthly Stakeholder (Objectives)
o Weekly Planning (Stories)
• Communication (newsletter, website, brown-bags, Kanban wall)
Victims of our own Success…
• One-Size-Fits-All Pilot no longer works at more teams onboard
o Expanded Training for users at lower levels of process expertise
o Increased support for diverse technologies via plug-ins and customizations
o Large Diversity in Technologies & Target Environments
o Revised Bundling Technique
• Rising fixed costs for Administration
o Moved to LDAP Groups to offload user access
o Created Administrative Reports
o Automated Platform Deployments
• Difficulty Policing Platform Customers
o Implemented Templates (Jenkins)
o Automated Compliance & Administrative Reports
• Heavy Load at Peak Periods
o Jenkins Slaves
o Labeling
Finally, automating Deployments…
• Release bundles
o Environment Agnostic
o Release Documentation
o Traceability
• Automated deployments
o Jenkins/Scripts
o Puppet
o Ansible
Knowledge Transfer and Signs of Growing DevOps
• Puppet & Ansible can live together
• Co-Location
• Shared Dashboards
Closing\Q&A
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will leave with an understanding that:
  • • An enterprise level shift towards DevOps is difficult even in the most favorable situation
  • • People, Process and Tools are all important during transformation
  • • Process and tools become more important in organizations (i.e., Government) where contracted staff is always in transition.
  • • There will be growing pains as you move from pilot to enterprise-wide adoption. What works today will not work tomorrow. Plan for it.
  • • A solid foundation in Agile best practices is critical to the success of a lasting CD/DevOps practice
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dan Craig

Dan Craig

Director, Agile Delivery, Steel Thread Software


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac 5/6

09:00

Not Doing SAFe? No problem. Not doing these? Big Problem (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
SAFe has attracted a lot of attention. While its detractors claim it is mostly good marketing, it is actually because SAFe addresses many key issues in Agile at scale that are ignored by virtually all of the current popular approaches. This talk presents what one must attend to regardless of one's approach. It then describes how these challenges are addressed in SAFe. Participants interested in scaled Agile in general or SAFe Agile in particular will find this talk of great value.
The talk discusses the following Agile at scale issues:
  • Why using a foundation of Lean-Thinking is essential
  • Why having explicit workflow and decision policies greatly increases learning
  • Why you must build quality in with Acceptance Test-Driven Development
  • Why it is important to delivery business incrementally
  • Have architecture epics be a peer with business epics
  • How to guide business value to be delivered in a hierarchy of portfolio, program, team and why this is necessary
  • Taking a four step process to large scale implementation 1) Use a portfolio kanban system to limit work on the development teams 2) Create cross-functional teams to the extent appropriate while organizing these teams so that they can work together 3) Adopt the appropriate work flow that includes test-first at at least the acceptance level and provides a common cadence of all teams to enable continuous integration 4) Use kanban to manage WIP at the front of the value stream
  • Have an owner for the development value stream
Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of the challenges facing an organization that develops software, either as a product or for IT
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac D

09:00

Challenges for Agile in Government - “Culture eats Strategy for Breakfast” (Bob Payne, Beth Miller)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Peter Drucker is attributed with saying “Culture eats Strategy for Breakfast”. Teams and organizations in the public sector are increasingly adopting Agile delivery methods, which can come with great cultural challenges. We often forget about the human aspect of transformation. Organizations need to understand that culture is just as important as process and strategy.
Public sector culture is very unique and can be challenging to understand. We have seen that Agile transformations can be supported by organizational culture but more often than not, the existing culture kills the transformation. In this workshop, we will explore this cultural shift and develop concrete strategies within the working groups. This talk is informed not just by theory, but by our Agile coaching work within a large government program with dozens of teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • This talk/workshop will help individuals to understand cultural challenges and best navigate through them
  • Attendees will also learn to align people around and create a culture that supports Agile delivery
  • Attendees will create techniques/activities to manage the non human aspect of the transformation
  • Attendees will walk away with strategies they can apply in their transformational shifts
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Beth Miller

Beth Miller

Managing Agile Consultant, Lithespeed
Beth Miller began her Agile journey as a Project Manager turned Scrum Master in 2006. She quickly gained interest in becoming an Agile coach and made that shift in 2011. As a coach she has worked with teams, individuals and leadership on their Agile transformations, both large and... Read More →
avatar for Bob Payne

Bob Payne

SVP of Agile Transformation, LitheSpeed
An early adopter of Extreme Programming, Scrum, and SAFe, Bob Payne has worked exclusively as a Lean+Agile Transformation leader since 1999.Bob hosts the Agile Toolkit podcast and has produced over 170 podcasts, recording a variety of industry leaders and Agile practitioners. His... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac C

09:00

Automated Testing of Mobile Apps (Karl Krukow)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Quality on mobile is a challenge! Developing mobile apps requires dealing with multiple platforms, OS versions, form-factors and resolutions, varying hardware capabilities and network conditions. At the same time, users have extremely high expectations for the mobile experience and will promptly punish with bad App Store reviews when disappointed. User expectations are set by fast-moving consumer apps such as Facebook, YouTube and Google Maps which deliver fast, responsive, quality apps with frequent release cycles.
Do you want to get started with automated testing (and perhaps BDD) while delivering on the technical challenges posed by mobile? This session is for you! The talk aims to inspire and empower attendees to start mobile test automation today -- the time is right and the tools have matured.
We set the stage by discussing the challenges of mobile quality, and argue that automation is central in scaling QA and moving towards continuous delivery. Then we show you a way forward by providing an introduction to the most popular open-source mobile test automation tools out there suitable for use with the most popular devices. We have a love for BDD and in our demos, we show how to create executable specifications for mobile apps which act as cross-platform automated acceptance tests.
If time permits, we will very briefly show how one might tackle the device fragmentation problem using Xamarin Test Cloud, a cloud-based service that provides managed access to more than a thousand mobile devices for the purpose of mobile quality assurance.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will leave with:
  • - An understanding of the importance of quality in mobile.
  • - A strong belief that professional practices can be applied in mobile too. That the tools have matured, and that automated testing, BDD, continuous integration and (almost) deployment is now viable and necessary.
  • - A way forward: how to get started today with cross-platform automated testing for mobile.
  • - Advice on technical best practices and pitfalls from an experienced practitioner.
  • - a fun experience in their backpacks ;)
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Karl Krukow

Karl Krukow

Lead, Xamarin Test Cloud, Xamarin
Karl Krukow is the Technical Lead on Xamarin Test Cloud, an innovative cloud-based service that provides managed access to more than a thousand mobile devices for the purpose of mobile quality assurance. Before joining Xamarin, Karl co-founded LessPainful, a mobile test automation... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 6/7

09:00

Agile UX Design and Innovation with the 10:3:1 Process (Andrew Bragdon, Peter Provost)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Designing and building great, innovative user experiences that end users love is hard. Integrating user experience design process into Agile software development also poses unique challenges. We present a process that we have iteratively developed on the Visual Studio and Application Insights product teams at Microsoft that integrates well into common Agile software development practices, and that produces design outcomes that are highly rated by end users. The key to this process is an adaptation of the 10:3:1 iterative design loop, which deliberately explores multiple design points in the design space, and then iteratively refines and winnows these designs into a final design via several iterations. We present how to scale this process to large development teams of 180 full time software engineers that are using Agile software development practices, working in a continuous delivery mode, collaborating with a design team of 3 or more designers, based on our product development experiences. We present practical considerations that helped make this process work well at Microsoft, as well as key pitfalls to avoid. Finally, we present processes for maintaining the consistency and predictability of user experience designs across multiple agile teams working in parallel, without creating centralized bottlenecks, and while still enabling individual teams to innovate and get customer feedback quickly for iterative improvement.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn simple, reusable, and practical processes for designing and building innovative user experiences that rate highly with customers
  • Attendees will learn how to make the processes scale to large teams
  • Attendees will learn about practical consierations that helped make the process work well at Microsoft, and how to avoid key pitfalls
  • Attendees will learn processes that maintain the consistency and predictability of user experience designs across multiple agile teams working in parallel, without creating centralized bottlenecks, and while enabling individual teams to ship continuously
Attachments:

Speakers
AB

Andrew Bragdon

Senior Program Manager, Microsoft
Andrew is a Program Manager on the Application Insights team, working on developer experience. Before that, Andrew worked on CodeLens and Code Map, features that bring code visualization and insights into everyday developer work, to enhance productivity. Andrew has a background in... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

10:45

Conflict: To Know It Is To Love It (Doc List)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We all talk about conflict. We all experience it. But do we really understand what causes it and how we deal with it? Do we have any idea what to do about it? Much research and study has been done, but that doesn't help when you're in the middle of conflict. You don't have time to pull out the reference book or go to a website. You need simple, clear understanding.
Learn the categories of conflict and how to recognize them, which means having an understanding of what generates them. Learn the different strategies of dealing with conflict, recognize your own preferred strategies, and understand where you may choose to change your strategy. Discover specific tools you can use in any situation to comfortably and confidently deal with conflict. Doc List introduces some ideas to enhance your learning after you leave the session, so you can continue to expand your love affair with conflict.

Learning Outcomes:
  • List two or more tools/techniques for addressing and dealing with conflict in a team
  • Demonstrate one conflict mediation technique
  • Define "conflict"



Speakers
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

Agile Coach, Trainer, AnotherThought
Doc spends time on passion projects to expand his style, skills, and experience. The rest of the time he's photographing weddings, portraits, head shots - people. Doc loves people.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac D

10:45

Eat Risks for Breakfast! (Mike Griffiths)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It has always been a good practice to engage team members in the estimation process; then agile methods taught us how teams should do the local planning and decision making too. So it should come as no surprise that the best people to undertake effective risk management are team members. They possess the best technical insight and are closer to any execution issues than team leads or project managers.
However, risk management as tackled by many organizations, is academic, boring, seemly removed from real-work and it often ignores the maximization of positive risks (opportunities). This workshop demonstrates how to turn teams into risk-consuming, opportunity-chasing beasts that have measurably different project outcomes!
At the Agile 2012 Conference I presented a session called “Collaborative Games for Agile Risk Management” that introduced fun, team based games to engage the team in risk and opportunity management. In the intervening years many teams have adopted these techniques and become much more effective at Risk Management. However it turns out I was focussing on the wrong end of the lever, the big news are the results teams are getting through Opportunity Management.
Teams using these approaches are not only driving out risks, but more surprisingly, building great inter-organization alliances, being given free passes on bureaucratic process and generally having an easier go of things. At first I was surprised at all the “good luck” these teams encountered but then I saw how small adjustments in team behaviour were being made towards freshly identified opportunities.
A little like the 18th Century discovery linking germs to infections that gave rise to the introduction of hand washing in hospitals increasing survival rate dramatically. Putting teams in charge of opportunity management leads to changes in day to day behaviour that dramatically increased the execution effectiveness and success rates of their projects.
Good leaders know the value of a powerful vision; it “Reveals a beckoning summit for others to chart their own course”. In other words once we know what our true goal is we can make our own micro adjustments. Getting teams to own opportunity exploitation makes them behave differently and benefits start occurring all over the project.
This session outlines the practices and reviews some case studies to so you can equip your team to be risk-consuming, opportunity-chasing beasts that leave a trail of business value and delighted stakeholders. Or, in the words of one team, they “Eat Risks for Breakfast and Poop Nuggets of Awesomeness All Day”.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • See why project managers are the least equipped to effectively identify and manage project risks.
  • • Learn engaging ways to educate team members about risk management including indentifying threats to avoid and opportunities to exploit
  • • Preview 5 collaborative games for effective threat and opportunity management from planning and identification, through management, to reporting and closure
  • • Understand the untapped potential of an increased emphasises on opportunity management
  • • Review case studies of projects teams that have been using these practices for three years and are achieving measurably better results than teams that do not
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mike Griffiths

Mike Griffiths

Leading Answers & RMCLS, Consultant
Mike is an agile author, speaker and trainer, who helped create the agile method DSDM in 1994. He served on the board of the Agile Alliance and the Steering Committee to create the PMI-ACP credential.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10/11

10:45

Agile White House: How the TechFAR & Digital Services Playbook are Transforming Government (Aaron Pava)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The White House recently launched the United States Digital Service to deliver “customer-focused government through smarter IT.” As part of this announcement the Office of Management and Budget released the Digital Services Playbook and an accompanying TechFAR Handbook "for procuring digital services using Agile Processes,” making it easier for government agencies to buy and implement Agile.
In this session, participants will understand the history, intentions and key components of these documents, and have a deeper understanding on how to bringing Agile into government agencies.
Learning Outcomes:
  • A history of government Agile directives
  • Understanding the objectives behind the new TechFAR Handbook & Digital Services Playbook
  • Practical implementation techniques for procuring and implementing Agile within federal government agencies


Speakers
avatar for Aaron Pava

Aaron Pava

Co-Founder, CivicActions


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 13

10:45

Blow the 'Self-Sealing Logic' Bubble (Oana Juncu)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We are drawn to people who share the same beliefs and have had similar relevant experiences. These groups give us strength and a sense of belonging. However, this creates a “self-sealing logic” that can lock out learning, because we state our beliefs as proven evidence. Every missed opportunity of collaboration, may it be at enterprise, organisation, or team level, is a symptom of our inability, as a group, to observe and learn from other group experience and set of values. We are here at the most important Agile Conference, seeking to meet people who have similar experiences, and eventually share same conclusions. What if we were about to create another bubble of "Self-Sealing-Logic" ?
The hands-on exercices used in the workshop use "Liminal Thinking", the latest fabulous work of Dave Gray, combined with examples of "Third Culture Kids" profiles. The approach aims to support organisations become continuous learning entities, that reinforce leadership and trigger cultural shift.
Session's main goals are :
  • create a space of opportunity to "unlock" our own bubble of beliefs through a set of hands-on exercices,
  • experience , through the open discussion during the exercices, how learning enhances leadership,
  • allow the audience to discover Dave Gray's "liminal thinking". We will learn to unveil the impact of our beliefs and start understanding why we have needed them. What were the relevant needs that lead to our assumptions? On the other hand, during the session, we will pick some other "self-sealing logic" group and try to understand without judgement their own process that led them from their own relevant experiences to different beliefs.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Awareness of our own beliefs as a members of a group
  • Experience Concrete tools to acquire this awareness
  • Have a new approach to create and foster openness of learning organisation
  • Enhance leadership via continuous learning
  • Have new ideas how to build sustainable change to Agile
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Oana Juncu

Oana Juncu

Founder, cOemerge
Oana's over 15 years of experience in Software Development and System Management led her choice to Agile, as the most effective approach for 21st century leading organizations focused on quality products creation that matter . She recently embraced the entrepreneurship path by founding... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 1/2/3

10:45

Explore with Intent - Exploratory Testing Self-Management (Maaret Pyhajarvi)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As an active learner, you will get better every day you spend on testing. Exploratory testing treats test design, test execution and learning as parallel, mutually supportive activities, to find things we don’t know we don’t know. Doing things in parallel can be difficult, and testing needs to adjust to the tester’s personal skill level and style. Your skill to self-manage your work and your learning - making learning and reflection a habit - is what differentiates skilled exploratory testing from randomly putting testing activities together.
This session teaches you how to explore with intent that fits your personal style and skill, and how to be courteous towards your team members with your information needs. For self-management skills of exploratory testing, we use a notebook thinking tool that focuses on four types of ideas in parallel to keep track of our exploration: Mission (sandboxing my services), Next charter (goal for a timebox), Details (notes I can act on now or postpone a little) and Other charters (identifying more work).
In addition to sharing stories and notes I’ve created on a notebook while I test, we will practice together the most difficult thing to do in parallel: focus on detail and the big picture of testing.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn to test with intent that fits your personal style and skill with simple self-management tool
  • Learn how 2 hours of testing can be completely different in contents and how you control the contents
  • Learn to keep track of what you are about to do when the plan is supposed to change as you learn, to know if you are done
  • Learn to handle interruptions to your testing to improve its flow: report/ask now or later and to collect ideas of what to test later while you are testing
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Maaret Pyhäjärvi

Maaret Pyhäjärvi

Testing Specialist, Granlund Oy
Software specialist with soft spots for hands-on testing, helping teams grow and building successful products and businesses. Agile, Lean, Lean startup are mindsets I work with. I work towards happiness and wellbeing of people who create software - not just programmers.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 12

14:00

Rewire Your Brain: Practices to Use Brain Plasticity to Become a Better Coach (Sarah Baca)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As agile coaches, we use strategies to empower our teams. But how can we teach our teams to be brave and innovative when we ourselves have brains that are wired to be fearful and judgmental? That is the opposite of bravery and innovation!
During this workshop we will learn and practice how we can consciously rewire our brains to become the coaches our teams need. How can we alter our thoughts to keep us calm when catastrophe strikes? How can we learn to accept reality and practice empathy?
Using research from the works of Dr. Rebecca Bailey, an expert in developmental psychology, and Dr. Brené Brown, a research professor, Sarah will take attendees on a journey through basic brain structure and brain plasticity. Attendees will learn how to rewire their brains and will practice exercises that they can continue at home to truly change the way their brains think. These skills take years to master, but learning to consciously change the way we think will be a great start on this journey.
Sarah has been practicing and coaching these skills with parents, children, scrum teams, and scrum masters for over ten years. She is passionate about the improvements that we can bring into our lives, teams, and companies when we make the time to consciously wire our brains for success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Familiarity with Dr. Bailey's Brain State Model
  • Exercises to form the neural pathways to maintain composure during times of stress
  • Exercises to help attendees move from the "fight or flight" part of the brain into the problem-solving part of the brain
  • Exercises to develop and practice empathy
  • Tools to begin transforming team culture by using intrinsic motivation



Speakers
avatar for Sarah Baca

Sarah Baca

Agile Coach and ScrumMaster, Pentaho
I'm an Agile Coach, mom of three and step mom of three. I am passionate about communication and authenticity. I strive to show how engaged workers who love their jobs make companies more profitable and help us make better products . I co-lead Agile Orlando and am speaking at Agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12

14:00

A Gentle Introduction to Reactive Extensions (Hadi Hariri)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Reactive Extensions have been around for quite a while. First originated in the Microsoft space, they are now available pretty much on any language and platform, including Java and JavaScript. In this session we’re going to understand what reactive extensions are all about and how we can leverage them to create asynchronous and scalable applications. We’ll see the benefits they provide over other more traditional asynchronous models and see how to put them to use with practical examples. This session is about finally understanding Rx and removing all the myth surrounding it.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the basics of reactive programming and what benefits these provide, as well as where to use it.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hadi Hariri

Hadi Hariri

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer and creator of many things OSS, his passions includes Web Development and Software Architecture. Has authored a couple of books, a few courses and has been speaking at industry events for nearly 15 years. Currently at JetBrains leading the Developer Advocacy team. Spends... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 8

14:00

The Secret of Our DevOps Success: Fostering Human Behavioral Change (Mark Nemecek)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
DevOps is all about continuous change and improvement. The only constant in a healthy DevOps culture is change. Conway’s Law teaches us that our systems will only change as our human communication methods change. That’s behavior. Ergo, if you cannot facilitate and provide for human behavior change, your DevOps culture will suffer as a result.
Problem: humans don’t like change. This is not a cynical statement. Humans evolved to be creatures of habit. Habit is safe. Routine is safe. The known is safe and the unknown is not. This one thing – the instinctive human desire to resist and rebel against change – is the single biggest blocker to a DevOps cultural transformation.
Our observations are that organizational rank is less relevant in this space. We can command that employees work, but we cannot arbitrarily command behavioral change. Introducing behavioral change via command without also aligning cultural perception tends to result in many points of subconscious rebellion that can ultimately defeat the original initiative without ever manifesting tangibly.
We have seen success here by selling ideas instead of instilling them forcibly. We have our partners, our teams and our change agents all arrive at a common truth via an interview and discovery approach instead of a command approach. In doing so, we align the culture on the idea and can then rely on cultural safeguards to see it through.
This is a powerful concept, but the path is fraught with pitfalls for the change agent, both external and internal. We’ve seen success and failure in this space, and the success/failure patterns may not be immediately obvious to newcomers. The ability to remove value judgments from change initiatives and willingness to prioritize the change atmosphere over one’s own ideas for change are among the critical characteristics we have seen in successful change agents. We will analyze these characteristics and others and discuss how to best stay on track for long-term transformational success even when short-term initiatives see rejection.
Attendees will come away feeling better empowered to attack the change needs in their respective organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Acknowledge that an organization’s ability to transform is directly dependent on the ability of its human resources to change behavior.
  • Acknowledge that telling people to work is very different from telling them to change; understand that change agency is difficult by nature, not because of any particular environment.
  • Learn that transformation that is worthwhile and successful is always born from a strong answer to the WHY argument, not the HOW argument. The HOW is transitive, but the WHY is your true north.
  • Learn to not attach personal value judgments to proposed changes; stop assigning “right” or “wrong” to initiatives when acting as a change agent, and thereby remove emotional attachment from the initiative; instead, one must make a judgment call on which change will provide the best cultural return on investment while keeping one’s eye on the long game.
  • Learn how to shift one’s approach to more successfully drive positive change in the face of resistance and adversity.
Attachments:

Speakers
MN

Mark Nemecek

Sr. Director, IT Infrastructure, CDK Global
20 year veteran of software development, including 12 years at Microsoft. Most recent 2 years spent in a DevOps-centric role in the hosting management org of CDK Global's IT division.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 12

14:00

Prototyping: Iterating Your Way to Glory (Melissa Perri, Josh Wexler)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Feel like your new product ideas are a bit stagnant? Most organizations start off strong in product development, but stop being innovative along the way. This happens when we focus too much on building instead of learning and iterating. In this workshop, you will learn how to overcome the psychological barriers to iteration by introducing a culture of learning into your organization using prototypes. Prototypes are a powerful tool for innovation, yet they are often misunderstood. You will learn about various prototypes, where best to use them, and the different types of fidelity. Through a hands on workshop we’ll get you out testing your ideas!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand a culture of learning and why it is important.
  • Learn about the psychological barriers to iteration and what you can do to overcome them.
  • Learn about the different types of prototypes and when to use them.
  • Learn about fidelity and the different components and levels.
  • Walk away with a useful tool (prototypes) to bring back to your teams that will get them iterating.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Perri

Melissa Perri

CEO of ProdUX Labs, Melissa Perri
Melissa Perri is a product manager, UX designer and speaker based in New York City. As CEO of ProdUX Labs, Melissa works on strategy and training for product management and UX teams around the world. As a practitioner and coach, she tackles her clients’ toughest product problems... Read More →
avatar for Josh Wexler

Josh Wexler

Director, Originate
Josh Wexler is an expert on early stage software innovation and prototyping process. He is currently a director of solutions at Originate, a digital product development firm. Previously, his company, Occom, was acquired by Originate. Occom was a firm offering ideation and product... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10/11

14:00

Be More Than a Proxy (Diane Zajac-Woodie)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As a business analyst on an agile team, do you spend your time gathering decisions from stakeholders and passing them on to development teams? Are you tired of simply being a “proxy without power”? And product owners, you have the power to make decisions on behalf of stakeholders, but is that your only interaction with the team? How can you do more to boost your impact?
Be more than a proxy.
By definition, a proxy means doing a thing “by the authority to represent someone else.” BAs, product owners, and product managers can all act as proxies by representing their customers and other business units. But too often, they limit themselves to specifying requirements and/or answering business questions for the team.
In this workshop, Diane Zajac-Woodie shows you how to go beyond those tasks and become more than a proxy. Through some experiential exercises, you will feel the impact of fast, frequent feedback on results. Diane also teaches you how to capture requirements collaboratively, using an acceptance test format. You will get to practice describing the exact behaviors that you expect in a format that everyone understands.
Coupled with facilitation skills and simple tools like story maps, you can learn to foster a collaborative environment. Be inspired to embrace your role in an agile environment and leave with new techniques that ensure that you will be more than a proxy when you head back to work next week.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience the positive impact that fast, frequent feedback has on results
  • Give some examples of how to use light-weight documentation
  • Explain what a story map is and why they are useful
  • Describe the timing of "just in time" requirements
  • Name several benefits to writing requirements collaboratively
  • Write requirements in a descriptive, collaborative format
  • List at least 3 skills that are valuable on an agile team



Speakers
avatar for Diane Zajac

Diane Zajac

Agent of Change, Green Jeans Consulting
Several years ago, Diane traded a career in corporate America for a life of coaching and she has never looked back. She now uses her 13 years of experience to help groups, from Fortune 50 companies to the U.S. Government, transform their people into high-performing teams. Drawing... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 1/2/3

15:45

The 10 Myths of DevOps (Seth Vargo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Although not officially coined until 2009, DevOps ideals have been explicitly discussed since at least 2006. Recently, however, the term "DevOps" has gained increasing popularity across a variety of fields and industries. DevOps is not a development methodology or technology; DevOps is an ideology. It is a way to facilitate organizational prosperity and growth while increasing each individual employee's happiness along the way. As DevOps has gained in prominence, a gap has been created between the original definition of DevOps and this new "enterprise-ready" buzzword.
For organizations beginning DevOps practices, this talk will provide a 10,000ft view of DevOps and how you can properly implement DevOps practices in your organization. For organizations that are currently practicing DevOps, this talk will cover common pitfalls, ways to sustain a happy culture, and new tips to foster organizational prosperity.
Learning Outcomes:
  • After this session, attendees will have a firmer understanding of DevOps is, and more important what DevOps isn't. They will be empowered to facilitate change in their organization, while avoiding common pitfalls new organizations trying to "implement DevOps" experience.
Attachments:

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

So what do we do with the architects? (Ryan Bergman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
You’ve made the switch to agile. You stopped doing comprehensive documentation and you have self directed teams that value emergent design right?. Then you notice that you forgot to give the architects something to do. Architecture is an activity that all teams need to perform and you might just have some experienced individuals around to help lead and guide them. In this presentation we will talk about what software architecture is, how teams accomplish it, and where the people traditionally called “architects” fit in an agile world.
Learning Outcomes:
  • When finished, participants should have a clear understanding of the different activities that architects perform and how self directed teams can accomplish them.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Lead Product Engineer, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include architecture, security, application usability, CI... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7

15:45

Agile Contracts: Blast Off to the Zone of Collaborative Systems Building (Drew Jemilo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Agile has moved far beyond commercial software into the world’s largest enterprises and government agencies. We have scaling methods which can help launch vehicles into the atmosphere and beyond, yet traditional contract mindsets have put a drag on escape velocity. But there’s good news! We have agile explorers discovering the next frontier of contract agility. Join us for this session and enter the new era!
TRADITIONAL MODELS TO LEAN-AGILE APPROACHES
Fixed requirements, big up-front design, and gated processes have been the norm. The rationale seemed logical in the past. It would not make sense to award a contract or commit to a major development investment without knowing what the system is supposed to do, how much it costs, and when it will be completed. We assumed that complex systems could be fully defined before they were built, that requirements and solutions would not change, and that we could build it right the first time.
Traditional models exist:
  • Fixed Price (also known as Firm Fixed Fee/FFF)
  • Time and Materials (also known as Cost Plus Firm Fixed Fee)
But Lean-Agile approaches are gaining momentum:
  • Variable cost with price ceilings
  • Variable scope driven by vision and backlogs
  • Innovation in timeboxes to explore and exploit new opportunities
  • Fixed quality based on sound technical practices, with “good enough” defined up front
SYSTEM INTENT IN THREE ZONES
We need to balance what is fixed and what is variable to achieve the intent of the system.
  • The Zone of False Expectations – Here, we believe we can define up front what is needed and that we can build it right the first time. For complex systems, we live in a zone of false expectations if we choose a pure Fixed Price or Time and Materials contract. Implementations can crash and burn.
  • The Zone of Innovation and Exploration – Here, you can use a Time and Materials model which operates within a timebox and high level scope reflecting the intent of the innovation and exploration. Undreamed ideas can soar.
  • The Zone of Collaborative Systems Building – This is the zone most enterprises strive for. A hybrid contract based on context can be our launch pad.
ENTERING THE ZONE OF COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS BUILDING
To enter this zone, we need a contracting model which supports realistic outcomes, balances non-negotiables, and builds trusting relationships. An agile guidance system will align procurement officers, lawyers, business sponsors, and project managers for contract agility!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify traditional contract constructs and communicate how they inhibit agility
  • Explain emerging Lean-Agile approaches to contracts in the private and public sectors
  • Understand and explain the "Three Zones of System Intent" model to provide a conceptual contract framework
  • Know how to apply the "Three Zones" model to balance Fixed Priced and Time and Materials terms
  • Identify additional contract terms to enable collaborative systems building
  • Gather the tools to change traditional mindsets which inhibit Agile Contracts
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Drew Jemilo

Drew Jemilo

CTO, Scaled Agile, Inc.
Drew is an enterprise Agile consultant, a principal contributor to the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), and a Scaled Agile Academy instructor. After starting his career at Anderson Consulting in the late 80s and early 90s, he moved to Van Kampen Funds, a subsidiary of Morgan Stanley... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 8
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

10:45

National Geographic: How To Implement Agile Processes In A 127 year old Magazine Tradition (Constance Miller)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What do you get when you mix a magazine that's 127 years old, some Agile training, a small team of designers, programmers, producers, photo editors, and a scrum master, and tell them to build mobile-first? You get a transformation. National Geographic magazine's digital designs were deeply rooted in the magazine, as were many of the processes, but it was time for a change. Here's how the digital team at National Geographic went through the transition from print-first to mobile-first, the ups and downs, and the continued learning of how to work together in a collaborative, transparent, and iterative way.

Learning Outcomes:


  • Steps to take when considering implementing an Agile framework

  • How to evangelize Agile processes in your organization

  • Ways to support staff while pulling them through the transition to Agile

  • How to be consistent and strong when getting push back from existing staff

  • How humor and humility go a long way when working with a group in transition





Speakers
CM

Constance Miller

Digital Media, National Geographic


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Potomac 4

10:45

Stop “Going Agile”! The three conversations you need to have before you start. (Heather Fleming)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
All too often, companies set out with the mission to “go agile” before truly understanding what that means. Business managers are quick to jump on the agile bandwagon, believing that “going agile” will magically make projects happen faster. Teams are getting certified in Scrum as if it’s a silver bullet that will suddenly make everyone more productive. Inevitably, cracks begin to show, and expectations are missed--leaving everyone involved questioning the value of “going agile” altogether.
There is a better way! The truth is that going agile will result in more productive teams and faster delivery of projects--but only if everyone can agree on the rules of the game.
Come hear Heather Fleming and Justin Riservato from Gilt discuss why gaining consensus on the principles of Agile is more important than implementing a process, and learn how having these three conversations can save you from an agile disaster:
  • “But when will you be done?” Why getting rid of the concept of deadlines is the most important (and most difficult) conversation when going agile.
  • “This is my top priority, but I can’t meet with you until next week.” What to do when your business partner can’t (or won’t) be a full member of the team.
  • “I just want to code. Why do I have to be in all these meetings?” Why implementing Scrum is not the first step to going agile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Setting up the conversations necessary to have before you "Go Agile"
  • Making sure all departments have the same understanding for what to expect.
  • Solving common problems when going agile or implementing scrum.
  • Setting up a winning experiment to rally people to your agile cause.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Heather Fleming

Heather Fleming

Senior Director, PMO, Gilt
As Senior Director of the Program Management Organization at Gilt, Heather Fleming oversees the execution of strategic technology initiatives across the companys 170-member tech team. Her chief aim: to challenge the status quo of project management best practices by continually experimenting... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 8

10:45

Agile Planning and Estimating Techniques in a Federal World (Brandon Raines, Edric Spruill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The government is seeing the merit of using agile practices to develop software. However, the fallacy that you can’t estimate projects using agile in the government still exist. The result is that many projects that want to use Agile begin in a very waterfall way developing the initial plan and are forced to stick to that plan throughout the project despite using sprints throughout the ‘development phase’. Many falsely believe they are stuck in the tradition of estimating everything in the beginning. During this presentation, through lecture and based upon real experiences, we will demonstrate techniques for developing a project plan and estimating techniques to satisfy the typical government compliance requirements using Agile practices and principles. Hear from a Government Division Manager who implemented these techniques within his Division. In essence, we will together learn how to build the bridge from the traditional government practices to a brave new world where we can plan, estimate and still inject agility.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the different levels of planning and how each level serves its purpose
  • Demonstrate estimating techniques at each level of planning
  • Demonstrate Agile planning and estimating techniques to answer typical government control gates and milestones without losing agility
  • Demonstrate techniques to track your estimates
  • What to track? What not to track?
  • Demonstrate techniques to track your budget against the value being incrementally delivered
Attachments:

Speakers
BR

Brandon Raines

Shokunin
Over a career spanning 15+ years, Brandon has been a developer, tester, project manager, architect, certfied scrum master, certified scrum practitioner and agile coach. Mr. Raines has helped teams mainly in the federal government as an Certified Scrum Coach(CSC) in their transition... Read More →
ES

Edric Spruill

Dr., US Government
Dr. Spruill has taught at several colleges and universities over the last several years to include Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Salem International University as well as other institutions. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he is a retired United States Army First... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

14:00

Agile Jesters, Magicians, and Clowns: Using the unexpected to move mountains and your team (Adam Weisbart)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Scrum is excellent at helping surface team and organizational dysfunction, but dealing with dysfunction can be uncomfortable. As an agilist, how do you help your team work through these newly voiced challenges?
Court jesters have a long history of helping give voice to uncomfortable truths, often speaking words that would have others killed. In the 1300's when the French fleet was destroyed by the English at the Battle of Sluys, the French king's jester told him that the English sailors "don't even have the guts to jump into the water like our brave French". This session will help you become an agile jester - speaking difficult truths through humor.
During this workshop you'll get hands-on experience using practical tools drawn from improvisational comedy, the art of magic, and clowning. Every agilist should have these tools in their bag of tricks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover improvisational comedy techniques and games to help elevate the mood of your team, discover hidden strengths, and find solutions to challenges your team is facing
  • Learn new retrospective techniques that will give your team an enjoyable, fulfilling, and powerful way to solve their current challenges
  • Experience how sudden juxtapositions, like those found in jokes, can help your team discover solutions to problems that seemed unsolvable



Speakers
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam Weisbart’s humorously irreverent approach to the serious work of organizational change helps teams and individuals break out of old patterns and discover new ways to improve. His belief that hard work need not be a somber affair infuses everything he does. Adam started his... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 3

14:00

Hands-on: Let's save some Legacy Code (Arlo Belshee, Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Like everyone else, you have a large product that is hard to work with. We're going to change that in 75 minutes. Together we will save some gnarly legacy code (one thousand-line function). We will start with something hard to read, untested, and possibly buggy. We will finish with code that is stupidly easy to modify. You'll learn 6 trivial techniques that you can apply over and over to fix 95% of the messiest code you have. You can take home this exercise to help the rest of your team learn these techniques. You'll also learn how your team can teach itself a bunch more techniques to handle the other 5%.
We are going to save some legacy code. In 75 minutes. While adding features. We will mob program; you will save this legacy code. We won't introduce any bugs along the way. We will spend the time that you would normally use reading code to instead make it readable. You can apply these techniques and reduce the cost of coding within 48 hours of getting home.
We have done this exercise with dozens of teams. They code differently now. Changing existing code is actually safer and cheaper than writing new code. Their designs get a little better each day. This session will improve your code and show you what skills to learn to gain further improvements.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Know the 6 refactorings required for reading code by refactoring it.
  • Differentiate between refactoring and micro-rewrites (code editing), and choose each where appropriate.
  • Have fluency in the key refactorings with one tool set and know how to spread that fluency to other tools and to broaden the skills within that tool set.
  • Able to start successfully saving legacy code without making major investments, even with no tests.
  • See an obvious path for continuing to learn design and refactoring skills - know where and how to get feedback and can create own curriculum for next 1.5-3 years of improvements.



Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Team Craftsman, Legacy Code Mender, and Rabblerouser, Tableau Software
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant... Read More →
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight a... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

The ABCDs of Database Development: Always Be Continuously Delivering (Elizabeth Ayer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Imagine the freedom you would have to develop great software if making changes to the database were both faster and safer. Hard to picture? Perhaps not - database changes are not so different from code, except for one essential difference: the data.
This session will explore the tension between the speed imperative of Agile and the safety requirements of database administration. Despite years of practices built around assumptions to the contrary, we will see how both needs are better satisfied when the two sides join forces. Faster and more reliable deployments can be achieved through a combination process change, education, and technology.
Together we'll walk a happy path through the technologies needed to automate a database delivery process. With actual customer case studies, we will look at steps to transformation, drawing out the common methods from their unique situations. You will come out with an understanding how to customize practices and toolsets, building a database delivery pipeline best suited to your environment. The result will accelerate your own database delivery, while protecting your organization's most valuable asset: its data.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand process and technology requirements to automate your release pipeline step-by-step.
  • Learn about the organizational changes necessary to support process modifications.
  • Appreciate why these changes are necessary to match modern development and deployment methodologies.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Ayer

Elizabeth Ayer

Product Manager, Redgate
In a past life, Elizabeth Ayer was a software developer at a large enterprise software organisation. In a sustained backlash against this, she has since focused her energy on creating the right environment for collaboration and innovation at all levels. Elizabeth is now a product... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 12

14:00

The Agile Value Chain — Embracing Agile Throughout the Enterprise (Ken Rubin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you work in an organization that expects development to be agile but doesn’t see any advantage of changing the way the rest of the organization operates? Do your colleagues in sales, marketing, finance, legal, HR, governance, etc., unintentionally make your job more difficult just by doing things they way they’ve always done them? Do you try to explain that agile requires changes across the organization, only to hear, “But agile is all about development, right?”
If so, I bet you’ve heard all the same excuses I have. Sales can’t operate in an agile-like way because legal demands they write fixed-priced, fixed-scope, fixed-date contracts. Finance would love to be more agile, but budget realities require that you submit a spending plan detailing where every penny will be spent a year or more ahead of time—and yes, you will be held accountable to that. Senior management would love to help limit the number of projects, but that would mean saying no to one or more stakeholders, which just isn’t politically feasible. So for now, they’d like to have all the teams show a little progress (however small) on every project.
It is a miracle that we can do any kind of reasonable agile development in this environment! The reality is that if we want to be successful with agile, I mean truly reap the benefits of what we expect to get from agility, then we need to embrace agile throughout the full value chain. In other words, the non-development parts of the organization have to embrace agile and align their efforts with those of development.
This presentation presents various strategies for aligning groups like sales, marketing, legal, finance, HR, and senior management with core agile principles. The goal is to create an agile organization, instead of one that all but guarantees a continuous stream of impediments that interfere with team-level agility and sub-optimize delivered value.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what is an agile value chain and why is it important to reaping the benefits of agility
  • Understand reasons why core agile principles are not being adopted through the value chain
  • Learn approaches to align sales, marketing, legal, and HR with agile development efforts
  • Learn how to include portfolio-level planning in the agile value chain
  • Understand the importance of including partners in the value chain and how we can do it
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac D

14:00

Introducing getKanban v2.0: Lean Principles for Experiential Learners (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Who loves sitting in a training room being lectured about agile? Yeah, me neither.
There are lots of agile games, where experiential learners can get hands-on and explore the principles of Lean and agile at their own pace. What makes an agile game great? The right mix of accurate—staying true to the principles and practices it teaches—and engaging—giving students a reason to care about the outcome so they'll play (and learn) from the heart!
In this session, we'll learn about one specific tried-and-tested great agile game. Using the open-source getKanban Version 2.0, we'll step through its game mechanics and review, in some detail, how each design decision helps to illustrate the fundamentals of Kanban. Along the way, we'll review a few key Lean principles and show how the game enlivens those lessons. When we're finished, you'll be ready to download the free getKanban game kit and play by yourself, or with your team, or even run your own big getKanban session with multiple play teams!
This session covers the basics of getKanban Version 2.0 for new players, plus a review of limiting WIP, creating a pull system, and working in cross-functional teams. Experienced Kanban trainers and coaches can also learn some new techniques for facilitating the game.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of learning styles when teaching agile
  • Recognize the ways getKanban illustrates real-world Kanban mechanics
  • Appreciate how limiting WIP is used in Kanban to create a pull system, and understand how T-shaped individuals help work flow
  • Learn how to facilitate a session of getKanban, including for large groups of multiple play teams



Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

Introduction to Agile in Government Agencies (Sujatha Augustine)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
placeholder for curated track session

Learning Outcomes:


  • tbd





Speakers
SA

Sujatha Augustine

Director, Program Office, Millennium Challenge Corporation
Sujatha Augustine is the Director of the Program Office at the Millennium Challenge Corporation. She manages the disbursement, tracking, oversight, and governance of multi-million dollar budgets with international portfolios. Sujatha has over twenty-five years of extensive experience... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

15:45

Sustainable Test-Driven Development (Scott Bain)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Sustainable Test-Driven Development
As Test-Driven Development has gained in momentum and popularity, it has also been called into question as a viable development strategy past the first 3-4 iterations in Agile projects. Many report that the test suite generated by the process can become a maintenance problem in and of itself, eventually collapsing under its own weight.
Is this an inherent problem with TDD, or simply a result of a misunderstanding of how TDD works, and what needs to be emphasized in order to keep it sustainable? In this presentation we will introduce the basics of automated test-driven development, and then briefly examine the specific factors that make it a sustainable process. This requires more than simply knowing how to write unit tests, but implies a style of test design that does not become un-maintainable as the test quite matures and grows in size.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to conduct the Test-Driven development process in a sustainable way. Also learn how/why TDD is also Test-Driven *Design*.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Bain

Scott Bain

Senior Trainer/Consultant, Net Objectives
Scott Bain is a 35+-year veteran in computer technology, with a background in development, engineering, and design. He has also designed, delivered, and managed training programs for certification and end-user skills, both in traditional classrooms and via distance learning. Scott... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

Value Stream Mapping Workshop (or: Improve your Organizational Efficiency) (Nayan Hajratwala)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you wonder how to go about improving:
  • the three weeks it takes to onboard a new employee?
  • the eight weeks it takes to get a new laptop provisioned?
  • the three months it takes to get a feature deployed into production?
  • the six months it takes to get a new server installed in the data center?
Value Stream Mapping is a technique that can help to uncover bottlenecks, queues, and silos in any of your organizational processes. In this session you'll see real examples of Value Stream Maps from my clients and how they were used to make changes. We'll then break up into teams and create value stream maps of your processes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of the components of a Value Stream Map
  • Understanding how to translate a Value Stream Map into actionable tasks.



Speakers
avatar for Nayan Hajratwala

Nayan Hajratwala

Chikli Consulting


VSM pdf

Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

15:45

Can you hear me now? Start listening instead (Judith Mills)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Have you experienced teams that lack ownership, that keep going to management for the answers that just won’t “step up”? In this session we will discuss why listening can help people and teams rise to the occasion and take ownership. By listening effectively we can ask the right questions for people and teams to change perceptions and take ownership.
In this interactive session we will talk about and practice listening and asking questions.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Scrum Master, coaches, mentors, and leaders at all levels will experience:
  • 1. How we stop listening once we think we know the answer
  • 2. How listening builds trust and respect
  • 3. How listening and asking builds ownership
  • 4. How asking questions can change perceptions
  • 5. Types of questions: Permission; Sharp; Probing; Outcome; - Reflection; Default/Always available questions; checking assumptions
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Judith Mills

Judith Mills

Coach, Judith Mills Consulting
Judith Mills is interested in people. Rising through the ranks from software engineer to VP Development at a global software company, Judith is equally comfortable talking with teams about building great applications as she is working on organizational strategy in the boardroom. Her... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 3

15:45

Agile Chartering from Strategic to Tactical: Managing Risk & Quality (Ainsley Nies, Elizabeth McClellan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Agile chartering adds practices associated with starting a project or stream of work– previously missing from the Agile “body of knowledge”–and connects the work with the larger organizational strategy and direction. Through agile chartering we consider the whole system that delivers business value. In this interactive session Ainsley, Elizabeth and Diana will demonstrate how the model of agile chartering from Liftoff: Launching Agile Teams and Projects can clarify direction through all organizational levels and amplify strategic intent with aligned tactics. We will present a high-level description of the agile chartering elements and participants will practice the activities used to mitigate project risk and reinforce the team’s ability to deliver quality products.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will:
  • • Identify a list of tools and techniques for chartering teams to strengthen business strategy, mitigate risks, and achieve quality
  • • Practice with visual tools and techniques for elements of chartering
  • • Discuss pros, cons, and applications of tools and techniques for chartering
Attachments:

Speakers
EM

Elizabeth McClellan

Visual Notes Artist, Elizabeth McClellan
Conversations are not linear. Topics move round and ideas bounce. My challenge is to capture the moment with text and images in order for participants to retain information. Ask me how to make your conversations visible.elizmcclellan.com


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

UseTables to Drive out Ambiguity/Redundancy, Discover Scenarios, and Solve World Hunger (Ken Pugh)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ambiguous or missing requirements cause waste, slipped schedules, and mistrust with an organization. Implementing a set of misunderstood requirements produces developer and customer frustration. Creating acceptance tests prior to implementation helps create a common understanding between business and development.
Acceptance tests start with communication between the members of the triad- business, developer, and tester. In this session, we specifically examine how to use tables as an effective means of communication. Employing tables as an analysis matrix helps a team discover missing scenarios. Redundant tests increase test load, so we show how performing an analogy of Karnaugh mapping on tables can help reduce redundant scenarios. We demonstrate that examining tables from various aspects, such as column headers, can reduce ambiguity and help form a domain specific language (DSL). A consistent DSL decreases frustration in discussing future requirements.
We briefly show how to turn the tables into tests for Fit and Gherkin syntax.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to elicit details of a requirement using tabular format
  • How to use tables to search for missing scenarios in acceptance tests
  • How to discover ambiguity and redundancy in acceptance tests
  • A way to logically connect tables to classes and modules
  • How to break complicated requirements represented by tables into smaller ones
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ken Pugh

Ken Pugh

Fellow Consultant, Net Objectives
Ken Pugh (ken.pugh@netobjectives.com, @kpugh, facebook/kpughconsutl) is a fellow consultant with Net Objectives (www.netobjectives.com). He helps companies transform into lean-agility through training and coaching. His particular interests are in communication (particularly effectively... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13
 
Thursday, August 6
 

09:00

Product Owner Value Game (Dajo Breddels, Paul Kuijten)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you a Product Owner that would like to become more value-driven? Are you struggling with helping Product Owners to become more value-driven? Are you looking for tools that can help the Product Owner be the best they can be?
Come play the Product Owner game with us, and experience what value-driven backlog refinement means.
We are out on a journey, mission if you will, to provide Product Owners with resources that enable them to be the best they can be. We feel it's the next frontier, and we feel that the next decade in agile will be about what it means to be value-driven.
This journey has taken us places, from the Agile Holland meetups, to Scrum Day Europe, to XP Days, to interesting clients. We received inputs from the agile community, and had fun playing and designing games that aid in the mission.
We will share this journey with you, and play the latest and greatest incarnation of the Product Owner Game with you.
The game is a turn-based card game, with the objective of delivering as much value as possible. Scarcity and chance play an interesting role.
The team that delivers most value wins the grand prize!!!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will play the game and learn about backlog ordering, refinement and value-driven development
  • Participants will receive the game to play it with others, and will have the knowledge to facilitate it
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dajo Breddels

Dajo Breddels

Coach, Dajo Breddels Coaching
Dajo Breddels, Agile Coach with a big interest in developing new playful and creative ways to give insights and help in cultural transformation.
avatar for Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten

Agile Matters
Paul Kuijten is an experienced agile coach, practicing agile software development since 2006. Paul has trained a lot of people on agile software development and related topics, and regularly presents to various audiences on various conferences. Having introduced agile software development... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac 5/6

09:00

Swarming : The Birds, the bees and Agile -or- How Managers influence self-organization (Dhaval Panchal, Thomas Perry)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We invite you to join us in sharing the questions that truly unsettle us about prevalent management practices.
“Nature is to be considered much less of a sucker than humans.” - Nassim Nicholas Taleb
You’ve heard it before, “You are agile now, go self-organize” and yet exactly how to do it remains a mystery. Beyond giving permission to “go agile” what else can managers do to help teams capitalize on the power of self-organization? Who’s the real sucker here? Perhaps the question should be, “What can nature teach us about self-organization?” How can we as managers use the lessons nature provides to our advantage?
Swarming is a dynamic act of being, of exhibiting collective action to solve complex problems which are beyond the capabilities of top-down problem solving. Natural systems have iterated over millennia to hone into simple rules. Studies of ants and bees and other beings in the natural world have revealed some of the underlying principles and techniques. These have found applicability into wide variety of problem domains. e.g.. battlefields, drones, supply-chains, autonomous robots etc. But people aren’t robots…or insects. Is there a practical way to use these strategies, these lessons of nature, to help provide guidance for those of us trying to create an environment that supports and nurtures self-organizing teams?
The purpose of our talk is to first, elevate the conversation about Swarming in software development from the “psuedo-management-pop” notion of “every body work on the same thing” approach. Second, in light of the our understanding about how utterly un-understandable complexity really is, we invite you to join us in sharing the questions that truly unsettle us about prevalent management practices. 
Learning Outcomes:
  • Overview of Ashby’s Law of Requisite variety and its consequences
  • Introduction to the role of Context Manager
  • Insights into the art of creating a context that supports self-organization or swarming
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dhaval Panchal

Dhaval Panchal

VP & Enterprise Agile Coach, agile42 US
Dhaval Panchal is a VP and Enterprise Agile Coach for agile42. He is a Certified Scrum Coach (CSC), Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), and Innovation Games Facilitator. Dhaval brings results-oriented, people-centric perspective while training and coaching. He is often described as a... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Founder, Thomas Perry LLC
Tom has been working as a transformation agent in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 6/7

09:00

Hands-on manual UI testing workshop (Emma Armstrong, Lisa Crispin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Most of us are faced with User Interfaces to test but how many of us are taught to actually test them? Have you ever forgotten to test something about a UI or have you had to cover environments where you are less familiar with system variations that may affect the application.

This workshop will look at both the theory and practice of testing User Interfaces. Using physical examples we will look at how the environment changes the tests you need to consider.
Working together through these exercises, you will strengthen your own testing skills library that you can draw from in the future.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to test a User Interface while it’s still in design
  • User Interface considerations to be aware of
  • Oracles and Heuristics to consider for testing User Interfaces
  • Environmental Variations that affect User Interfaces
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Emma Armstrong

Emma Armstrong

Mrs, Towers Watson
Emma Armstrong is a test engineer and has been baking quality into software since 2000. In that time she has gotten her hands dirty with both manual and automated testing and had the opportunity to dig into everything from compilers to web applications.She has worked with most methodologies... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin

Co-founder, Agile Testing Fellowship
Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (2014), Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (2009), the LiveLessons "Agile Testing Essentials" video course, and “The Whole Team Approach to... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac D

10:45

Waterfall Theater: Understanding Emergence through Performance (John Krewson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
"The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams." Most people read this and focus on the self-organization element of the principle. But what about the concept of emergence? How do requirements "emerge" exactly? And how do self-organizing teams enable emergence?
In this highly interactive workshop, we'll get a hands-on lesson on emergence and self-organization using an unlikely source of inspiration: The theater. During the 75 minute session, attendees will envision, write, rehearse, and perform one-minute episodes of "Waterfall Theater". Throughout the process, we'll discover the difference between emergence and specification, the benefits of iterative and incremental delivery, and the power of a self-organized team with a shared goal.

Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this session, attendees will
  • * have a hands-on understanding of emerging requirements and design
  • * understand the relationship between emergence and vision
  • * be a part of a self-organizing team
  • * understand the role that trust plays in self-organization
  • * build something iteratively and incrementally



Speakers
avatar for John Krewson

John Krewson

Agile Transformation Lead, MasterCard
John Krewson (@johnkrewson) is the Agile Transformation Lead at MasterCard and a consultant whose expertise is based on real-world experience rather than regurgitated dogma. His communication skills, patience, and Agile experience blend into a unique style that is both approachable... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Amplify Learning in Your Orgnaization (Matt Barcomb)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Learning organizations sound great to just about everyone. But how do you actually “create” them? Attempting to promote learning in many organizations can seem daunting at best and impossible at worst…especially if you don't feel particularly empowered to do so.
In this session, Matt will focus on what you can do. First, he discusses what a learning organization is and why they are important for the future of many companies. Next, he'll share approaches and techniques for growing learning environments; covering everything from being and individual contributor on a product development team, to senior leaders who'd like to start organizational programs. Finally, he will end by reviewing challenges and pitfalls to be aware of as you begin to amplify learning in your organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Intro to learning organizations and environments
  • - What is a learning organization & why it is important
  • - Concepts for creating a learning environment
  • - How to model learning behavior
  • Techniques for amplifying learning
  • - Finding the time for learning
  • - How to build learning into any task
  • - Learning with your dev team’s daily work
  • - Approaching product Development as learning
  • - Organizational programs to encourage learning



Speakers
avatar for Matt Barcomb

Matt Barcomb

VP Org Design, LeanDog
Matt Barcomb has over 18 years of experience as a product development leader who takes a pragmatic, systems approach to change. He partners with organizations to help leadership teams develop & deploy strategy, optimize product management & development, and evolve traditional HR functions... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 4/5/6

10:45

Scrum Tetris: The Secret to Fitting All That Work Into a Single Sprint (Jesse Fewell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you struggle with the notion having a shippable product increment every two weeks? Do you have too much architecture and testing that could possible fit? Are your teams demanding more time than the business can wait? This hands-on exercise will help you plan what to do now, what to do later, and why.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Rather than waiting for everything we could want to do our work, the agile mindset is one that demands forward movement with what we have.
  • Rather than pushing out all the quality and deliver work until the end, the agile mindset is one that demands prioritizing our work.
  • Rather than settling for Sprint 0 and Release Sprints, we can evolve and mature to do more work
  • Rather than focusing on the local efficiency of more features at once, an Agile mindset is one that demands faster delivery, even at the expense of rework



Speakers
avatar for Jesse Fewell

Jesse Fewell

Agile Coach & Trainer, JesseFewell.com
Jesse Fewell is a writer, coach, and trainer in the world of management and innovation. From Boston to Bangalore, he's helped startups and conglomerates alike catapult to breakthrough results. His adventures are written down in "Can You Hear Me Now", his handbook for remote teams... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 7/8/9

14:00

Be brave! Try an experiment! (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
I have given several presentations about the use of powerful stories instead of science in our industry, so I thought I should try to be more helpful and give a session on how to conduct an experiment. No, this is not too rigorous! We are not going to talk about statistics! We are going to talk about cheap, easy experiments, what to do, what to be aware of, including our cognitive biases. I will share some of my experiences with teams who are really doing it. The goal is to encourage everyone to be a bit more methodical in decision-making and to replace "that won't work" with "how can we test it."
Learning Outcomes:
  • I hope that participants will walk out the door with a plan in hand for one or more experiments to run in their workplace. I hope to improve the scientific vocabulary a bit and introduce some of our cognitive biases that get in the way of decision-making.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Linda Rising

Linda Rising

Computer Software Consultant and Professional, Linda Rising LLC
Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives in Nashville, Tennessee. She has written and contributed to many books and numerous articles, with her latest book published last year – More Fearless Change co-authored with Mary Lynn Manns.Linda is an internationally known presenter... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac C

14:00

The Santa Monica Experiment (Dominica DeGrandis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
This is a true story about the trials and tribulations of an Operations team during a period of extreme growth. A team sinking in endless requests and expedited issues and what happened as they began to measure their capability while pushing back on the barrage of customer demands. We’ll examine the three metrics that mattered, the failures along the way, and the forum used to influence the desired outcome.
The Problem
A team of forty Ops Engineers was tasked to build out six new data-centers in six different countries within six months. And roll out a new configuration management tool. And deploy features from development teams. And implement stronger security. And support live issues. And implement a new monitoring system. And support various requests from 41 other teams.
Conflicting priorities and over-commitments, exacerbated by a lack of communication led to serious interrupt-driven context switching and missed commitments. Commitments made on behalf of the team by leadership were often not communicated to the team. It wasn’t clear how decisions were made. A dismal hand dealt to the team for sure. How to insert a voice of reason in this madness?
The Approach
Quantifiable Ammunition - stay calm and collect data!
Decisions needed to be made. How to build and present a case to influence those decisions? Providing relevant metrics in an objective data-driven fashion brought essential visibility and transparency to the problems. Let's look at the diplomatic approach used to communicate the costs and risks of the decisions made.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • Why a gradual and humble approach to change worked
  • • How we identified which metrics mattered
  • • How the Operations review format worked to influence decision makers
  • • Resulting successes and failures and what I would try differently next time
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dominica DeGrandis

Dominica DeGrandis

Principal Flow Advisor, Tasktop
Dominica DeGrandis is the author of Making Work Visible: Exposing Time Theft to Optimize Work & Flow. She is a huge fan of Flow and uses visual cues to inspire change. As Principal Flow Advisor at Tasktop, Dominica introduces organizations to flow metrics & Value Stream thinking... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 6/7

14:00

Is there a best practice for an agile transformation? - No! – So what Now? (Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Companies and organizations are complex, adaptive systems. In this talk you will learn what this actually means and how you can use this to practically deal with your way through your (agile) transition.
You will learn why there are no best and no good practices, that you can just copy and everything is fine – and what the nature of an agile transition really is.
You will learn about an example of a successful agile transition and what factors made it successful.
And you will learn to use a tool I have developed, to find and analyze approaches to see whether they might be promising for you to try out. We use (and evolve) this tool at my company, Ericsson (24,000 people in R&D), since 1 ½ years and have found it very helpful.
The talk will introduce and make use of Systems Thinking and Complex Adaptive Systems theory. Many people struggle with applying these concepts practically in their daily working life. You will learn how to bring these great and promising theories “down on earth” and make them practically usable.
So, if you are on an agile transformation, no matter whether you are just getting started or whether you have progressed already: this talk will give you new insights and a very solid foundation - based on state-of-the-art leadership- and problem solving approaches – to make your journey more successful.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The essence and practical implications of Complex Adaptive Systems theory.
  • What it practically means, that an agile transformation is an emergent result.
  • The role of good practices in an agile transformation (and evolution).
  • A tool that helps to identify and distinguish potentially successful approaches/good practices from potentially unsuccessful ones.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a manager... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

14:00

Surviving a Series of Unfortunate Events; Building Trust and Making Agile work in the DoD (David Bulkin, Verlisa Taylor)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Our project was suffering from a series of unfortunate events; it was behind schedule, over budget, re-baselined twice and nearly cancelled. The PM and one third of the staff was gone. Needless to say we did not have a trusting relationship with our client or their other contractors. We knew for sure we could no longer conduct business as usual.
We had to convince our government partners that they did not make a mistake in trusting us. Agile had to rebuild relationships, knock down barriers, and produce quick results.
W are government contractors to the United States DoD, working with other contractors (competitors), in an environment that was heavyweight and plan driven. We used agile to drive trust and transparency, which led to collaboration and real results.
If we made agile work you can too!
This real world, exciting, workshop includes case study interspersed with frequent exercises and discussion so that you can take what we learned and apply it in your context.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Explore techniques to increase transparency and build trust
  • Recognize trust as the foundation for success in a government contractor relationship
  • Understand the importance of having the PO role filled by a government customer
  • Explore techniques to engage the PO daily to quickly make value decisions
  • Learn how to work across organization with competitors in a collaborative manner
  • Engage stakeholders and end users in the Sprint Reviews and Planning
  • Learn how to report in manner consistent with government needs while maintaining agility
  • Gradually replacing traditional, sequential, milestone phased gate reviews
Attachments:

Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

Managing Directior, Grow-Lean LLC
David Bulkin is the Managing Director at Grow-Lean where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience... Read More →
VT

Verlisa Taylor

Project Manager, ManTech Internation


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 3

14:00

Group Learning. Today’s exercise: Unit Testing (Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Everyone know that continual learning is important, but how do you keep your team learning new skills when you don’t have them yet?
Together, we will look at using Koans to learn programming languages, api’s, and development techniques. We will be doing an exercise in unit testing, but
you don’t need to be a programmer to attend this session.
The actual focus is on learning and teaching in groups. As such, there are 3 ideal personalities for this workshop:
  • Managers/Teachers who need to teaching their team things they don’t know themselves.
  • Programmers who want to increase their unit testing skill set.
  • Instructors who want to create their own self guided curriculum

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to learn in a group
  • How to do/create koans
  • How to gather insights from a group
  • The importance of stating the obvious
  • Tips & tricks in eclipse/visual studio (I will poll the audience at the start to choose language)
  • How our perceptions color and influence what we see and learn
  • How to learn incrementally
  • How to learn without an expert



Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight a... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

Freedom to work (Hadi Hariri)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Three people founded JetBrains over 15 years ago. Today, with nearly 600 people, we have multiple award-winning products and offices in many locations around the world. Yet despite the growth we’re still rooted on our key core values: hiring good people and giving them the freedom to work.
At JetBrains we don’t have open floor plans. People need their private space. We don’t have working hours or timesheets. People come and go as they please. We don’t ask for reports and we certainly don’t micromanage. There’s pretty much no hierarchy and the idea of command and control is non-existent. Leadership is born out of respect from peers.
But as with everything, there are also challenges. In this talk we're going to look at the pros and the issues, and how we face some of these.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Provide experience on how we cope with:
  • Remote work and teams spread across multiple offices
  • How to deal with meetings (or lack of them) when people come and go as they please
  • How to deal with lack of process
  • The challenges of providing this kind of freedom
  • Keeping communication going as a company becomes large
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hadi Hariri

Hadi Hariri

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer and creator of many things OSS, his passions includes Web Development and Software Architecture. Has authored a couple of books, a few courses and has been speaking at industry events for nearly 15 years. Currently at JetBrains leading the Developer Advocacy team. Spends... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Node.js Crash Course (David Neal)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Node.js is a compelling platform that is quickly spreading from startups to the enterprise. Node.js strategically unites developers of all backgrounds through the common language of JavaScript. Why should you learn Node.js and where do you start? You will come away from this talk with the evidence to support Node.js, and tools you need to be productive. We will walk through a typical workflow of creating and debugging a web application. You will learn how easy it is to deploy, including Microsoft Azure. We'll also look at popular frameworks and modules, and other learning resources to give you the best start.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Pros and Cons of Node.js over .NET
  • How to get started with Node.js
  • How to create a Node.js project in Visual Studio
  • How to debug Node.js applications
  • How to deploy a Node.js application to Microsoft Azure
  • Additional learning resources
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Neal

David Neal

Developer Advocate, LeanKit
David is a family man, geek, musician, motorcyclist, speaker, and software developer living in North GA. He's currently a Developer Advocate for LeanKit. He's a Microsoft MVP, and runs on a high-octane mixture of caffeine and bacon.


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 10/11/12

15:45

Docker Enables DevOps (Boyd Hemphill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The information architecture of the outline below is how the slide deck will be laid out. Each section will follow the same format giving the attendee a pattern to hold on to while many new concepts and perspectives come at them.
Introduction (10 minutes) - common ground
  • Who am I
    • Founded and run Austin DevOps (since 2012)
    • Run Docker Austin (2014)
    • DevOps Days Austin Organizer
    • Container Days Founder and Organizer
  • What is DevOps
    • DevOps is the way a technology organization embeds itself in a business to the benefit of that business
  • What is Docker
    • A quick history of containers
    • Containers v. Virtual Machines
    • Docker is linux containers for mere mortals
Docker accelerates developers (10 min)
What this looks like:
  • Traditional - Disposable Development environments
  • Forward Thinking - Better modeling of the production topology
  • Bleeding Edge - Produce container images as black boxes
The Agile Test:
  • (y) Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    • Developers can take risks such as upgrading PHP knowing they can get back to a working state in seconds instead of days. Enabling innovation means better velocity.
  • (y) Working software over comprehensive documentation
    • We don't care about the contents of the container, just that it passes tests (unit, functional, security, performance etc). The tests are the documentation.
  • (y) Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    • A developer can change the function of a service in a container and show it to a customer (B2B) asking, "like this?"
    • Developers can kick out new features that can be A/B tested on a SaaS offering (B2C)
  • (y) Responding to change over following a plan
    • New features in languages (the PHP example above), run time environments, web servers and the like are constantly happening but cannot be tried or deployed until containers.
Docker Accelerates Build and Test (10 min)
What does this look like:
  • Traditional - Better parallelism in software build and test grids
  • Forwared Thinking - Better modeling of the production environment in testing
  • Bleeding Edge - Build systems produce container images as artifacts to be run in production
The Agile Test:
  • (y) Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    • At the bleeding edge, collaboration across function becomes about producing tests rather than processes for inhibiting innovation. Code becomes the documentation and collaboration happens at the engineering level rather than the process control level.
  • (y) Working software over comprehensive documentation
    • Better modeling of the production environment, especially in a disposable way, means testing happens faster and more accurately.
  • (m) Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    • A/B testing is a form of collaboration, though generally an individual customer is unaware they are a test subject.
  • (n) Responding to change over following a plan
    • Responding to change is the definition of both build and quality engineering. Docker adoption has no effect.
Docker Accelerates Project Management (10 min)
What does this look like:
  • Traditional - None
  • Forward Thinking - Coordination between Dev and QA is ease
  • Bleeding Edge - Problems of The Mythical Man Month are eased by micro teams
The Agile Test:
  • (y) Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    • Micro teams build around micro services need only communicate to to other teams when they make a breaking change. This, for example, can take a development team of 20 individuals and turn them into a collection of 5 micro teams. PM's need only manage the communication between teams when breaking changes occur, and only between 5 teams.
  • (n) Working software over comprehensive documentation
    • PM's don't write or operate software. Docker has no impact here.
  • (m) Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    • Use of disposable environments could lead to PMs doing check-ins with customers that ask, "You mean like this?"
  • (y) Responding to change over following a plan
    • On the bleeding edge change becomes about how to ensure behavior of software rather than people. Software problems are easier than people problems.
    • Change is most painful at the hand off between Dev and QA. Since that handoff is now a simply container image, the technology friction is reduced to nearly zero. This means the PM is free to focus on higher value issues.
Docker Sprains an Ankle in Operations (15 min)
What does this look like:
  • Traditional - Gnashing of teeth, stress and obstinance
  • Forward Thinking - Working with DevOps thought leaders to identify an appropriate sandbox to do real world R&D.
  • Bleeding Edge - Micro services teams (Netflix), Single tenant systems (Pantheon), Bleeding edge shops (Offers.com)
The Agile Test:
  • (n) Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    • At the operational level, Docker is a technology.
  • (y) Working software over comprehensive documentation
    • Containers are portable, so "works on my machine" is not a consideration in a Docker shop. When it gets to Ops, it works. Testing will need to focus on security and performance.
  • (y) Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    • In the Pantheon example, this is a crucial point. Customers use the fully featured system indefinitely for free. They purchase value added services like performance, back up and the like.
  • (n) Responding to change over following a plan
    • Ops, by definition, is about eliminating the need for reaction in the production environment.
Summary (5 Min)
  • Should you consider a Docker Adoption at Your Company?
    • Can you derive benefit where it matters most? (making money)
    • Can you sandbox the adoption to create safe or low risk learning opportunites?
    • Can you work with your operations team to identify these sandboxes?
    • Can you, by success, generate a demand across all teams in a project for the use of Docker?
Questions (15 min)
  • A list of the books and web content referenced in the talk will be on screen during Q&A
While I am extraordinarily keen to attend the conference and hone my own understanding of the Agile practice, I am at your service. Docker is a hot topic, so if there is need to start a "hallway track" after to the time slot to continue Q&A or start a B.O.F. in the evening, then I will work with you to service that demand. I would love to do a B.O.F. in the Lean Coffee format in the evening after the talk!
Learning Outcomes:
  • The attendee will walk away from this talk with enough high level information to determine is they should invest real time and effort investigating a Docker adoption.


Speakers
avatar for Boyd Hemphill

Boyd Hemphill

Director of Cloud Infrastructure, Contrast Security
Boyd Hemphill is the CTO at VictoryCTO where he helps customers win in their respective markets by realizing the potential of their technology. Boyd is a DevOps raconteur and thought leader in the silicon hills of Austin Texas. Boyd founded Austin DevOps and plays a role in the... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13

15:45

Detox your team: A low-conflict language for discussing and managing toxic behavior (Ken Power)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Toxic behaviors destroy an organization. Left unaddressed they will fester, causing unhappiness, poor performance, dysfunction, and worse. There are all sorts of impacts at a personal level. There are also real impacts at a business level.
Many of us have been at the receiving end of toxic behavior at some point in our lives. We know the feeling, and we know it sucks. What’s often harder to admit, or recognise, is that sometimes we are also guilty of exhibiting toxic behavior ourselves.
As leaders in our respective organizations (and we can all choose to be leaders regardless of our title) we have a responsibility to set the tone for the organizations and groups that we’re part of. We don’t want to tolerate toxic behavior but how do we even begin to talk about it in a way that doesn’t make the situation worse?
This will be a light, fun, non-threatening workshop session. You will not be asked to reveal anything personal. You will not be put in an uncomfortable position. Everyone will be a participant, but you will decide the level of your participation. You will come away with a language for addressing toxic behavior, and some tools you can use immediately with your teams or groups.
Learning Outcomes:
  • A language for discussing toxic behavior
  • An exercise you can run with your teams to discuss and weed out toxic behaviors
  • Some ways to detox your environment
  • A simple model for accountability that you can use to keep the toxins out
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

Enterprise UX: The Next Generation (Virginia Cagwin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Some say the Enterprise is where great design goes to die, but we are now seeing a shift in large enterprise companies as well as those building enterprise software adopting UX. As the Cloud is becoming the preferred choice and users are demanding better experiences, enterprise companies are going to need to change to keep up with their customer demands. This is where LeanUX and Agile UX can help.
Attendees will walk away with a set of tools to help make the cultural shift. I’ll briefly discuss the history of Enterprise software. I’ll explain how to use lean personas and design studios when you don’t know who your customers are or any requirements to go by. We will also discuss the benefits of balanced teams to encourage collaboration between developers and product owners.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will walk away with:
  • * Set of tools to help make the cultural shift
  • * How to use lean personas and design studios when you don’t know who your customers are or any requirements to go by
  • * Benefits of balanced teams to encourage collaboration between developers, business analysts, QA, and product owners



Speakers
avatar for Virginia Cagwin

Virginia Cagwin

UX Consultant, Slalom Consulting
Virginia Cagwin is a UX Consultant for Slalom Consulting that practices Lean UX methods to help teams gain shared understanding, focus, and communication. Virginia started her design career has a graphic artist working on brands such as McDonalds, Dunkin Donuts and Baskin Robbins... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 4

15:45

Bootstrap your Business Model: Business Agility on the Back of a Napkin (Bernie Maloney)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
With every product we ship, we learn what we wished we’d known: what customers really wanted. What if you could gain those insights before beginning development? What if you could “unit test” a product idea? Or at a bigger level, what if you could “system test” your business idea/plan?
Engineering teams are experiencing productivity gains of 30-300% when applying Agile and Lean practices and methods. These same Agile and Lean principles can be applied beyond engineering, to the business itself. Using a lightweight yet powerful tool, assumptions behind a business plan can be tested and iterated almost on-the-fly. With a hands-on exercise, attendees will learn how to build a map of any business ecosystem, and how to use it to check and iterate solution viability. Come experience the application of Agile to Business so you and your team can focus on your richest opportunities over chasing your competitor’s taillights.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to amplify Agile’s power of Inspect & Adapt by applying it in business layers
  • How to Paper Prototype a Business or a Product Definition ahead of development
  • How to “unit test” a Product Idea to find Minimum Viable Product
  • How to “system test” a Business Model to find Product Market Fit
  • Experience creating a Business Model for a simple product, and exploring how the same product could be used to solve multiple customer problems
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bernie Maloney

Bernie Maloney

Agile Coach | Accelerating Genius, Persistent Systems
Bernie’s career started with a flash and a bang. Literally. His first position was designing devices that protect telephone networks from lightning strikes. A few career pivots later, he had a flash of insight: it was possible to tap into latent potential in every person, every... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 1/2/3
 
Friday, August 7
 

09:00

Agile Hiring: It’s a Team Sport (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When you think of hiring for your team, does the paperwork overwhelm you? Are you concerned about the number of interviews you seem to need to make a great decision? Do you ever have trouble making a decision, to know if this candidate is right for you--the team, the project, and the organization? You know the cost of hiring people is high, and the cost of not getting the right person is even higher.
You can apply agile to your hiring, iterating on everything and learning about your hiring with feedback. Learn how to involve the entire team, including the sourcing. Collaborate with your recruiters when they use a kanban board to track candidates and where they are in the process. Iterate on the job description (and job ad) based on what you see in candidates. When you involve the entire team, you can create questions and auditions that work. Learn how to identify candidates who fit your culture and those who don't.
This session is a timeboxed interactive workshop. Let's make your hiring more agile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - How to organize the hiring process to take advantage of iterating and feedback
  • - How to collaborate with the entire team
  • - How to help the recruiters be agile and lean with boards
  • - What to look for in a candidate
  • - How to ask questions that get at the essence of what you need in a candidate
  • - How to create auditions that reflect your culture
  • - How to hire for cultural fit
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several books... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac C

09:00

“Follow-your-nose” testing – questioning rules and overturning convention (Christin Wiedemann)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Is testing really keeping up with the advances of software development? Are our testing approaches evolving as quickly as the new technologies, or are we being left behind, using the same methods and techniques as we did a decade ago?
Testing needs to get more innovative, find new ways to test more efficiently and effectively, and to better adapt to each unique context. The first step is to realize that testing is not about finding answers, but about asking questions. Nobel laureate Dr. Michael Smith advocated “follow-your-nose research” in his field, biotechnology; he was willing to pursue new ideas even if it meant that he had to learn new methods or technologies. Similarly testers should do “follow-your nose testing”, exploring new approaches and questioning old habits.
This workshop suggests an approach for test planning that encourages innovation and overcomes barriers to quality. Through a cogent discussion of ideas around brainstorming, collaboration and creativity, you are provided with new insights that can help you revolutionize the test industry! Working in smaller groups we explore different examples of test challenges we have experienced ourselves, covering topics ranging from tools and environments to methodologies and teams. Using our new tools for encouraging innovation through collaboration, we try to come up with revolutionary suggestions for how to address these challenges. Focusing on asking the right questions, we might also come up with a few answers.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Testing needs to continuously re-invent itself to keep up with the advances of software development, which means we need to creative a collaborative environment that encourages creativity and innovation.
  • Takeaways:
  • + A presentation of ideas about why testing needs to get more innovative
  • + Why classic brainstorming doesn’t work, and how to build creative, innovative teams
  • + Tools to re-invent testing practices
  • + An understanding of what “follow-your-nose testing” is, and how to apply it on any software development project
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christin Wiedemann

Christin Wiedemann

Exec. VP, PQA Testing
After finishing her Ph.D. in Physics at Stockholm University in 2007, Christin Wiedemann started working in IT as a software developer, but soon discovered that she found software testing to be more interesting and challenging. Changing careers, she started working as a tester, and... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 7/8/9

09:00

Research is not just for the UX team; Strategies for everyone to understand end-users (Amanda Stockwell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
UX research is often relied upon to gather iterative feedback in the design and development process, but not every team has a research specialist. It can be hard to know what kind of research to do when and easy to assume that as designers or developers you’ll be able make the best call for your user. However, leaving user research out of your Agile development process leaves room for you to spend time working on a feature that isn’t a priority for your target customers or implementing a feature ineffectively.
Come to this session to get an overview of the key goals of user research, the key methodologies that any team member can employ, concrete tips for how to select the best method given your goal, and advice to craft your research plans the best way to get the information you’re looking for. This session will be most useful for those interested in UX research but don’t have formal training, such as UX designers, developers, or product managers.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Each participant will leave with a general overview of the general UX research goals: to understand end-users goals needs and behaviors, understand clients’ business models and goals, and how well we’re serving those users.
  • I'll share a story that serves as a reminder that no matter how smart and diverse our teams are, we do not represent our users effectively and need to do research to understand them.
  • I'll provide a description of what general type of research is appropriate in what setting; quantitative research, such as surveys or analytics reviews, is most useful to understand trends and what is happening. Qualitative research, such as usability tests or interviews, is most effective for understanding the context for those trends and understanding why they’re happening.
  • I’ll discuss the differences between attitudinal and behavioral feedback and map each user research method to the type of feedback necessary for particular research goals.
  • I’ll talk about ways to best craft test plans and questions to get the most accurate and unbiased information that anyone from any discipline can employ.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Amanda l Stockwell

Amanda l Stockwell

Principal, Stockwell Strategy
Amanda Stockwell is President of Stockwell Strategy, a UX research practice focused on lean research methods and integrating user knowledge with business goals to create holistic product strategies. She has spent most of the last decade focused on finding innovative ways to understand... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 8

09:00

Backlog Refinement – The Rodney Dangerfield of Scrum ceremonies (Richard Dolman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
I tell ya’ sometimes I feel like Backlog Refinement just don’t get no respect!
Ever been in a Sprint Planning session when the team doesn’t have enough understanding of the product backlog items (PBIs) to effectively plan the Sprint?
Does your team feel like they don’t have time to "waste" elaborating PBIs, learning about Acceptance Criteria, or collaboratively estimating as a team?
Has someone mandated it’s “too expensive” or “inefficient” to bring the whole team together regularly or that just one or two “leads” can should review and estimate PBIs for the entire team?
These misconceptions and related anti-patterns are far too common when new teams begin transitioning to Agile/Scrum.
Backlog Refinement may be the 2nd most important activity (after the Retrospective) for enabling team improvement. But too often, new Scrum teams neglect it only to find themselves struggling to establish predictability, sustainable pace, stakeholder engagement or collective ownership. The most common indicators of this neglect emerge in painful and ineffective Sprint Planning, as well as a repeated “undone work” pattern at the end of the Sprints.
We can avoid this by emphasizing the value of “Collaborative Discovery” over just "reviewing the Backlog".
Join this session to learn common sense practices and techniques to help optimize the emergence of requirements, and why it’s the conversation that matters, making Backlog Refinement a must-do, indispensable team learning activity.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn to leverage Backlog Refinement as the container for:
  • collaborative discovery
  • lightweight design and visualization
  • good Story writing
  • clear, demonstrable Acceptance Criteria
  • effective and collaborative elaboration and decomposition
  • vertical slicing
  • relative estimation
  • just-in-time planning
  • Attendee Call to Action - "What can you take back to your teams to help them improve?"
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Dolman

Richard Dolman

Enterprise Agile Coach and Trainer, agile42
My professional passion is helping companies solve critical business and technology challenges, and empowering and enabling collaborative, high-performing teams.


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

09:00

Quantifying Cost of Delay: Why is it the “one thing” to quantify? How do I do it? (Ozlem Yuce, Sean Barrett)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Quantifying Cost of Delay not only helps improve prioritization, it also help with making trade-off decisions, creates a sense of urgency, and changes the focus of the conversation. Maybe this has got you interested in experimenting with it, but you’re not sure how to get started? If so, this workshop is specifically for you!
When people hear about Cost of Delay they sometimes doubt whether their organisation is ready for it. They say things like, “We don’t have the maturity for it”, or “We couldn’t do that because our stakeholders wouldn’t support it”. We’ve heard people say this too. And yet, in hindsight, people find it much easier than they thought! We will show you how to get started with using Cost of Delay, despite these doubts.
Building blocks
The first essential building block is to understand the value. To help structure the conversation we will use a simple economic framework to surface the assumptions and drive to the economic impacts. The second essential building block is to understand the urgency. For this, we will look at different urgency curves to help us understand how value is likely to decay over time. Combining these two gives us the Cost of Delay helping us to question and better understand what our gut tells us about value and urgency.
Practice makes perfect!
To get going, we will start by looking at some simplified scenarios that help you put what you’ve learned about Cost of Delay into practice. You’ll work at your own pace through some simple exercises that test different aspects of your understanding. To really embed it, once you’re done you’ll get a chance to help others around you – you become the teacher. We will then quickly reflect on what we’ve learned so far.
Then, we’re all going to work on quickly estimating the Cost of Delay for a real life example for a real company. You’ll do this in pairs making assumptions you need to get to a cost of delay for the feature in dollars per week. To help us learn about what the key assumptions were we will compare results across the group to help us understand what the value might be and the areas of greatest uncertainty.
To wrap up we’re going to ask you to do a mini-retrospective about what you’ve learned and what your puzzles are. If we have any time left, we’re happy to help you have a go with a feature or project you are working with.
Learning Outcomes:
  • By the end of this session you should be able to go back to your organisation armed with a better understanding of what Cost of Delay is, why it’s useful and be confident enough to apply it.
  • Learn about an economic framework for estimating value
  • Learn about the most common urgency profiles we see
  • Do some exercises to work out the Cost of Delay for a set of scenarios
  • Get some practice with helping others to calculate the Cost of Delay
  • Learn about the assumptions we often need to make in order to calculate Cost of Delay.
  • Get to a Cost of Delay figure (in dollars per week) for a real situation, compare and contrast with others.
  • Be able to calculate the Cost of Delay for your own Project or Feature.


Speakers
avatar for Ozlem Yuce

Ozlem Yuce

Chief Product Officer, Agile@Heart
Ozlem works with teams to quickly develop products and services that truly delight customers. With 15 years experience working in e-commerce, software and product development, she has worked with everything from Fortune 500 behemoths to fast-growing Inc 5000 startups. Ozlem has... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac 5/6