Loading…
Agile2015 has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Collaboration Culture & Teams [clear filter]
Monday, August 3
 

10:45

Improvisssssing With Agile (Paul Goddard)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Collaboration is considered a fundamental part of "being agile" but how can you help your team understand HOW to collaborate? "Improvising" is not really about being funny, or panicking when things go wrong. It's a simple process that groups of actors follow in order to create interesting stories and scenes without the aid of a script. This session will show how the five 'secrets' of improvisational theatre can support an agile team's growth and also give you some practical guidance on how to get your team's collaborative and creative juices flowing from the very start!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees have learned some basic agile principles around collaboration and listening
  • Attendees have learned how to run some basic improv games in their own teams
  • Attendees have a five principles to summarise the ethos of improvisational theatre
  • Attendees have realised how collaboration and creativity come hand-in-hand
  • Attendees have had some fun and made some new friends
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Goddard

Paul Goddard

Agilify


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 5/6

10:45

The Secret Sauce of Agile - A Culture of Great Meetings (Laura Burke, Jean Tabaka)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Spreading Agile to the rest of your organization requires the wisdom of your teams. You can reveal this wisdom through servant leaders and neutral facilitators. In this session, participants move through several aspects of collaborative meetings by practicing in small teams as well as with the entire group. You will leave with 25 simple tools and techniques that you can take back to your organizations to support truly collaborative cultures.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learning Outcomes:
  • - 25 facilitation tools and techniques to prepare and run collaborative meetings
  • - tips for balancing the input of introverts and extroverts
  • - subtle ways that keep a room “safe” for new ideas
  • - why it’s critical to gather the wisdom of the room before converging on a decision



Speakers
LB

Laura Burke

ScrumMaster, Ipreo
As a ScrumMaster at Ipreo, I work with mobile development teams spread across two states and three countries. Every team wants their product on a phone or tablet, so I get to partner a lot of teams and R&D leadership to improve our alignment and agility. | | Past experiences... Read More →
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

Drive: How we used Daniel Pink’s work to create a happier, more motivated workplace (David Mole)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you inspired and happy in your work? Do you feel motivated to give your best every single day? Inspired by Daniel Pink, we delved into the research of what actually motivates people and can now tell you the intriguing story of what we learned and how we were able to create a significantly happier, more productive, motivated workplace by focusing on Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose - the key concepts made famous by the book Drive (and the associated TED talk and online video clips).
Through a combination of research, coaching and lots of trial and error we made a range of changes to the way we worked and to our environment. Proudly, we were able to significantly increase happiness and in turn directly impact the productivity of our Agile teams (although the happiness spread into the wider workplace too!). Of course not everything worked and you will hear about the strategies that triumphed and those that (sometimes spectacularly) flopped! After hearing this talk, you will not only be able to understand what we did and why but you will also take away techniques and ideas for experiments that you can try for yourself.
Debunking stubborn workplace myths along the way, we can also demonstrate exactly what happens to an organisation when you focus on happiness and motivation as your key measures and all the other KPI’s take a backseat. Importantly this is about much more than the theory, yes we will cover that along the way, but we will also tell the story of how we have been able to strategically improve happiness and productivity at one of New Zealand’s largest organisations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The audience will:
  • - Understand the key concepts which sit behind happiness and motivation at work
  • - Understand why old fashioned thinking and myths no longer apply in the modern workplace
  • - Take away ideas and techniques for measuring happiness and understand which ones may be most applicable at their organisation.
  • - Identify and understand the overlap between happiness, motivation and Agile the principles.
  • - Understand the link between happiness and productivity with strategies for influencing both.
  • - Hear a real story of how this work has been applied at one of New Zealand's most well known businesses.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Mole

David Mole

Agile Coach, Nomad8
After speaking about Self-Selecting teams at last year's conference, this year I will be speaking about how we used Daniel Pink's work around Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose to create happier more motivated teams. | | @Molio | https://nz.linkedin.com/in/davidmole


Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

09:00

Being Agile: Having the Mind-set that Delivers (Gil Broza)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you excited about adopting Agile? Have you put in place the roles, artifacts, meetings, tools, lingo, and teams? Are you then realizing the promised benefits -- happy customers, quality product, reliable delivery teams, faster releases?
Would you honestly answer "yes"? Or would your answer really be "only some of the benefits," "inconsistently," or "we did, initially"? If so, you're not alone. In most organizations, these results are due to an Agile implementation that is mechanical, rigid, and driven by tools and so-called "best practices." But Agile is much more than a process; it’s first and foremost a mind-set that permeates your actions. Without the mind-set, you cannot achieve and sustain great results.
In this talk, Gil Broza will guide you through the values, beliefs, and principles that define Agile thinking. You’ll learn how to choose Agile-minded methods, process, and practices for your needs and context. And with the deep understanding of what makes Agile work, you’ll be able to support mindful implementation and the necessary culture change.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain clarity on the values, beliefs, and principles that define Agile thinking
  • Learn how to choose Agile-minded methods, process, and practices for your needs and context
  • Support mindful implementation and the necessary culture change
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gil Broza

Gil Broza

Agile Mindset Coach and Trainer, 3P Vantage, Inc.
Gil Broza can help you increase organizational agility and team performance with minimal risk and thrashing. Dozens of companies seeking transformations, makeovers, or improvements have relied on his pragmatic, modern, and respectful support for customizing Agile in their contexts... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10/11

10:45

Eat Risks for Breakfast! (Mike Griffiths)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It has always been a good practice to engage team members in the estimation process; then agile methods taught us how teams should do the local planning and decision making too. So it should come as no surprise that the best people to undertake effective risk management are team members. They possess the best technical insight and are closer to any execution issues than team leads or project managers.
However, risk management as tackled by many organizations, is academic, boring, seemly removed from real-work and it often ignores the maximization of positive risks (opportunities). This workshop demonstrates how to turn teams into risk-consuming, opportunity-chasing beasts that have measurably different project outcomes!
At the Agile 2012 Conference I presented a session called “Collaborative Games for Agile Risk Management” that introduced fun, team based games to engage the team in risk and opportunity management. In the intervening years many teams have adopted these techniques and become much more effective at Risk Management. However it turns out I was focussing on the wrong end of the lever, the big news are the results teams are getting through Opportunity Management.
Teams using these approaches are not only driving out risks, but more surprisingly, building great inter-organization alliances, being given free passes on bureaucratic process and generally having an easier go of things. At first I was surprised at all the “good luck” these teams encountered but then I saw how small adjustments in team behaviour were being made towards freshly identified opportunities.
A little like the 18th Century discovery linking germs to infections that gave rise to the introduction of hand washing in hospitals increasing survival rate dramatically. Putting teams in charge of opportunity management leads to changes in day to day behaviour that dramatically increased the execution effectiveness and success rates of their projects.
Good leaders know the value of a powerful vision; it “Reveals a beckoning summit for others to chart their own course”. In other words once we know what our true goal is we can make our own micro adjustments. Getting teams to own opportunity exploitation makes them behave differently and benefits start occurring all over the project.
This session outlines the practices and reviews some case studies to so you can equip your team to be risk-consuming, opportunity-chasing beasts that leave a trail of business value and delighted stakeholders. Or, in the words of one team, they “Eat Risks for Breakfast and Poop Nuggets of Awesomeness All Day”.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • See why project managers are the least equipped to effectively identify and manage project risks.
  • • Learn engaging ways to educate team members about risk management including indentifying threats to avoid and opportunities to exploit
  • • Preview 5 collaborative games for effective threat and opportunity management from planning and identification, through management, to reporting and closure
  • • Understand the untapped potential of an increased emphasises on opportunity management
  • • Review case studies of projects teams that have been using these practices for three years and are achieving measurably better results than teams that do not
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mike Griffiths

Mike Griffiths

Leading Answers & RMCLS, Consultant
Mike is an agile author, speaker and trainer, who helped create the agile method DSDM in 1994. He served on the board of the Agile Alliance and the Steering Committee to create the PMI-ACP credential.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 10/11

14:00

Retrospectives: Moving From A Subjective To An Objective World (Prateek Singh)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Traditionally Agile teams run retrospectives to facilitate learning, development, collaboration and improvement of the team. Teams have tried multiple different formats to get the right outcomes. Issues of all sorts seem to pop up many times - lack of participation, finger pointing, irrelevant topics, lack of prioritization of issues. Are these or similar problems hindering the effectiveness of your retrospectives? What format of retrospective can best promote the culture of collective vision and collaboration in your team? How can we get the best outcomes fro the team by having the most collaborative retrospectives? Recently numerous teams have moved to objective retrospectives from a completely subjective form of retrospective as a solution. Objective retrospectives use the team’s data to conduct the retrospective, to create talking points and to see the effects of action items taken by the team since the last retrospective. We will go over examples of patterns seen in metrics and graphs to assist with identification of talking points and examples of resultant action items. We will also do a deeper dive into facilitation of techniques for facilitating both subjective and objective retrospectives. We will also talk through figuring out the best format to choose for
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees are expected to learn which retrospective techniques work best for teams of different maturity levels. They will be able to pick up subtleties of different types of subjective retrospectives. They will be guided towards the best formats of retrospectives for the particular nuances of their team. They will gain a generic knowledge of how to look at scatterplots and Cumulative Flow Diagrams and deduce information from these. Examples of patterns to look for and the lessons that have been learned by other teams when they have looked at these patterns will also be presented as a starting guide to Objective retrospectives. This would help attendees both conduct and participate effectively in whichever style of retrospective the team chooses. The target audience is the leaders of teams that are looking for effective retrospective styles, with participants of these retrospectives being a secondary audience.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Prateek Singh

Prateek Singh

Principal Agile Coach, Ultimate Software
Prateek has been leading and working on agile teams for the past 10 years. Starting with XP, then Scrum and now working in a Kanban system, Prateek has gained a breadth and depth of knowledge regarding agile techniques, practices and implementation principles. Prateek is currently... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Are We Doomed to Sticky, Tricky, & Icky?: Women and Men Working Together on Agile Teams (Sharon Buckmaster, Diana Larsen)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Are you a woman working in software development, or are you a man who cares whether women can fully contribute at work? Have you experienced or heard about situations at work that were complicated by issues about women and men working together? If you answered “yes” to the first question, more than likely you also answered “yes” to the second. Difficult working relationship are endemic when gender expectations clash. We can do better.
Join Sharon and Diana in this session that will explore practical solutions to this tough problem through lively conversations. We will turn actual real life experiences into opportunities to learn from each other's situations, to establish working agreements for acceptable and mutually beneficial professionalism, and to diminish the impact of harassing behavior on individual targets by exploring a greater sense of personal power.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will take away:
  • Better understanding of the obstacles to and enablers of healthy collaboration between women and men at work
  • A list of strategies to apply back on the job, including avenues for taking action
  • Stories/examples of “good practices” that work well in other organizations and might work for you
  • A perspective on the scope of the problem and an awareness of the benefit of making situations visible
Attachments:

Speakers
SB

Sharon Buckmaster

FutureWorks Consulting LLC
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

founder, Agile Fluency Project LLC
An international authority in Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile transitions, Diana Larsen co-authored the books *Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great*; *Liftoff: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams*; and *The Five Rules of Accelerated Learning... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

Scaling the Social Fabric of Agility (Eric Willeke)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Congratulations! You've received incredible benefit from adopting agile approaches with your teams, and you're exploring and implementing tools to expand those benefits to ever-larger efforts involving more people, bigger goals, and much higher cost and impact for your company. This is the moment when every group needs to struggle with one of the most important challenges: How do we sustain and grow the social dynamics that have made agile successful? Agile processes, regardless of approach, are successful because of changes in how people work together, and failure to address this challenge early typically results in a "big dump process model", rarely resulting in meaningful, sustained change to the organization.
This talk explains six collaboration-focused perspectives and tactics that are consistently found valuable when focusing multiple agile teams on a single larger outcome. The collaboration techniques covered include one shared goal, two axes of engagement, three steering councils, the new gang of four, fist of five, and the six supporting roles. Designing your team of teams considering these six techniques will accelerate your improvement journey and improve your likelihood of successfully implementing any scaling model at the program level. These patterns are extracted from experiences helping launch and evolve programs using multiple scaling approaches (including SAFe, multi-team Scrum, and scaled kanban approaches) across a variety of companies and industries (more than 20 different agile programs of 50-150 people).
Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize the human element of SAFe release trains
  • Seed the social structures that drive real agility
  • Amplify individual excellence across the release train
  • Reduce risk of SAFe being a “big dumb framework”
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Eric Willeke

Eric Willeke

Founder and Principal, Elevate.to
Improving business outcomes through agility and helping everybody sleep better at night.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 13
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

10:45

Build Strong Teams through Trust & Alignment (David Hawks, Doc List)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
One of the key aspects of high performing Agile teams is trust. Trust is hard to define, and sometimes hard to earn and to give.
In this session, as a group we explore common team dysfunctions, such as lack of trust and alignment. You will learn a number of techniques for coaching teams such as journeylines, personal maps and constellation. After exploring and learning, you will conduct two exercises in groups: Moving Motivators, and a Team Values Exercise. These tools help teams work through conflict and change, and are valuable tools in your toolbox. These exercises also empower you to create and commit to an action plan that strengthens your team through trust and alignment.
Learning Outcomes:
  • List three or more common team dysfunctions
  • Identify five techniques for building team trust
  • Feel comfortable facilitating a “team trust and alignment” exercise
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Hawks

David Hawks

CEO, Agile Velocity, LLC
Founder and CEO of Agile Velocity, David Hawks is a Certified Enterprise Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer who is passionate about helping organizations achieve true agility beyond the basic implementation of Agile practices. David's primary focus is to guide leaders through their... Read More →
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

Agile Coach, Trainer, AnotherThought
Doc spends time on passion projects to expand his style, skills, and experience. The rest of the time he's photographing weddings, portraits, head shots - people. Doc loves people.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Stop “Going Agile”! The three conversations you need to have before you start. (Heather Fleming)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
All too often, companies set out with the mission to “go agile” before truly understanding what that means. Business managers are quick to jump on the agile bandwagon, believing that “going agile” will magically make projects happen faster. Teams are getting certified in Scrum as if it’s a silver bullet that will suddenly make everyone more productive. Inevitably, cracks begin to show, and expectations are missed--leaving everyone involved questioning the value of “going agile” altogether.
There is a better way! The truth is that going agile will result in more productive teams and faster delivery of projects--but only if everyone can agree on the rules of the game.
Come hear Heather Fleming and Justin Riservato from Gilt discuss why gaining consensus on the principles of Agile is more important than implementing a process, and learn how having these three conversations can save you from an agile disaster:
  • “But when will you be done?” Why getting rid of the concept of deadlines is the most important (and most difficult) conversation when going agile.
  • “This is my top priority, but I can’t meet with you until next week.” What to do when your business partner can’t (or won’t) be a full member of the team.
  • “I just want to code. Why do I have to be in all these meetings?” Why implementing Scrum is not the first step to going agile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Setting up the conversations necessary to have before you "Go Agile"
  • Making sure all departments have the same understanding for what to expect.
  • Solving common problems when going agile or implementing scrum.
  • Setting up a winning experiment to rally people to your agile cause.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Heather Fleming

Heather Fleming

Senior Director, PMO, Gilt
As Senior Director of the Program Management Organization at Gilt, Heather Fleming oversees the execution of strategic technology initiatives across the companys 170-member tech team. Her chief aim: to challenge the status quo of project management best practices by continually experimenting... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 8

14:00

Agile Jesters, Magicians, and Clowns: Using the unexpected to move mountains and your team (Adam Weisbart)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Scrum is excellent at helping surface team and organizational dysfunction, but dealing with dysfunction can be uncomfortable. As an agilist, how do you help your team work through these newly voiced challenges?
Court jesters have a long history of helping give voice to uncomfortable truths, often speaking words that would have others killed. In the 1300's when the French fleet was destroyed by the English at the Battle of Sluys, the French king's jester told him that the English sailors "don't even have the guts to jump into the water like our brave French". This session will help you become an agile jester - speaking difficult truths through humor.
During this workshop you'll get hands-on experience using practical tools drawn from improvisational comedy, the art of magic, and clowning. Every agilist should have these tools in their bag of tricks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover improvisational comedy techniques and games to help elevate the mood of your team, discover hidden strengths, and find solutions to challenges your team is facing
  • Learn new retrospective techniques that will give your team an enjoyable, fulfilling, and powerful way to solve their current challenges
  • Experience how sudden juxtapositions, like those found in jokes, can help your team discover solutions to problems that seemed unsolvable



Speakers
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam Weisbart’s humorously irreverent approach to the serious work of organizational change helps teams and individuals break out of old patterns and discover new ways to improve. His belief that hard work need not be a somber affair infuses everything he does. | | Adam started... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 3

14:00

The Agile BA: For an Agile team...you complete me! (Robert Woods)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Business Analysts assigned to assist Agile teams or working directly on an Agile team may find themselves either torn in many directions or struggling to see where they fit in. Business Analysts considering Agile as professional growth may be hesitant due to rumors they've heard about struggles for Agile BA’s and the nightmares of going from a strict Waterfall environment to an Agile one. Robert Woods from MATRIX will help attendees tackle head on some of the rumors and myths surrounding the Agile BA and very common struggles a Business Analyst may encounter with Agile teams. Attendees will see how the Business Analyst role is actually critical to the Agile team's overall success. We will answer questions such as:
• What is the role for an Agile BA?
• How can I help my Agile team with compliance and documentation needs?
• Why is my Waterfall experience not a bad thing?
• How will Agile improve my overall collaboration on business requirements?
• How does my job as an Agile BA create real business value?
• Where are my opportunities for professional growth on an Agile team?
Attendees will walk away with practical ways they can become active leaders for their teams, achieve professional growth and help bridge the Business and IT Alignment gap so many organizations strive for!
Learning Outcomes:
  • • The critical role an Agile BA brings to their team and organization
  • • Dispelling rumors around Agile documentation
  • • How a BA with Waterfall experience brings value to an Agile team
  • • How Agile has helped BA's improve how they elicit requirements and features
  • • How successful Agile Business Analysts have created professional improvement and growth opportunities for themselves.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Robert Woods

Robert Woods

Director National Agile Practice, MATRIX
Robert Woods serves as Director of the National Agile Practice at MATRIX. He has been in IT for over 20 years serving in such roles as Sr. Systems and Networking Engineer, Project Manager, Program Manager, and Agile Coach. Robert has spent years working with organizations on collaborative... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Potomac 5/6

15:45

Global Teams: Cracking the Culture Code (Mike Palladino, David Bulkin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
More and more agile efforts involve development teams and stakeholder groups dispersed throughout the world. Distributed projects are more difficult to execute for obvious reasons, including time differences and language barriers, but cultural differences, and the lack of understanding them, create problems that no video conference, wiki, or international flight can solve.
You need to crack the culture code. By cracking the culture code for agile teams, you can establish credibility, overcome communication barriers, create an environment of trust and get things done.
Come to this interactive session that has been honed by over a decade of delivery and learn how to work with international teams and execute successful projects across geographical and culture divides.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop both cultural and self awareness
  • Learn ways to address cultural differences
  • Learn ways to build trust across cultures
  • Learn how to view cultural differences in a new light
  • Learn how cultural differences impact everyday interactions



Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

Managing Directior, Grow-Lean LLC
David Bulkin is the Managing Director at Grow-Lean where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience... Read More →
MP

Mike Palladino

Head/Director, Agile Center of Excellence, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Michael Palladino is a Project Management and Agile professional with broad experience across several industries. He is the Head, Agile Methods Center of Excellence at Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals. Mike is an adjunct Professor at Villanova University, Past President of PMI-DVC... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

15:45

To collaborate, let's stop talking first (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Don't you just hate it when a collaboration conversation stalls out and the only sound you hear is crickets? Awk-waard. Or, when a conversation becomes a battle of wills between two strong people, each advocating for their idea as if it's life or death? Here we are, agilists, and we're supposed to know how to do collaboration, yet the reality of team collaboration is often not as rosy as the buzzword. We still largely rely on talking as a primary means of collaboration, but that is not always the highest bandwidth form of communication, surprisingly enough. In fact, methods that have people collaborate silently FIRST can be a better way to go.
In this session, you will experience one such method known as informal constellations -- they unstick conversations when they stall, unknot excessive advocacy and, generally, get the team's creative juices flowing again. They are incredibly powerful for helping a team see what's really happening so that they can make wiser decisions of all kinds, including how to better self-organize!
This is a workshop. First, you will experience the power of informal constellations as we do a few together. Then, you will be led, step-by-step, through the process of crafting constellations for your teams back home. In addition, the key aspects of successfully facilitating constellations will be revealed so that you can determine if you, or someone else, should step into the role of facilitator. This is a hands-on practical session, and includes a handout you can take home so you can better integrate what you learned. Constellations are fun and amazingly effective! Come play and learn.
Learning Outcomes:
  • people experience one method for juicing up collaborative conversations when they stall (informal constellations)
  • people see what is required to facilitate something like this successfully, and may begin to see the gap for themselves
  • people walk away with something ultra practical: an approach for conducting informal constellations with their teams
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac C
 
Thursday, August 6
 

09:00

OFFENSIVE BODY LANGUAGE - Using Body Language to Augment your Message (Chuck Suscheck)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
One of the principles of agile is to use face to face, high bandwidth communication. Body language is a big part of face to face communication. It can be used to communicate better, to convey confidence, and to make people comfortable This presentation is about the applying the unspoken communication of body language – in the context of agile teams.
This presentation addresses using use body language to enhance your message and how to avoid contradictory body language. Most people know how to read body language to one degree or another and man trainings have been given on how to read body language. This presentation is different – it focuses on how to contort, control, and move your body to make body language work for you and send a better, more powerful message. It also addresses applications of new research that indicates body postures can induce certain mindsets.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The learner will see body language as a tool for better communication from the standpoint of managing body language rather than reading others.
  • The learner will understand common subconscious body language mistakes and be more conscious of them when communicating with others.
  • The learner will understand that body language leads to behavior, not always follows behavior.
  • The learner will be able to use techniques to model body language and thereby induce a desired mindset.
  • The learner will understand gender specific body language and ways that the different genders can use body language to communicate with social etiquette.
  • The learner will understand culturally specific body languages and ways that different cultures may interpret western body language.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chuck Suscheck

Chuck Suscheck

Professional Trainer, scrum.org
Dr. Charles Suscheck specializes in agile software development methodologies, and project management. He is one the few people in the world certified to teach the entire scrum.org curriculum. He has over 25 years of professional experience in information technology, beginning his... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

09:00

The Single Most-Important Skill Every Agilist Needs (Susan DiFabio)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What is the single most-important skill needed by every member an Agile team? Here are some hints. It builds a culture of trust. It facilitates collaboration. It is critical in conflict resolution. It is a foundation for being able to deliver the right software. And it is something everyone can learn.
It is (drum roll please)… Active Listening.
Yup, active listening. That’s it. Sound simple? Maybe…. Think you already know how to do it? Perhaps…. And yet, in my experience, it is one of the most underused skills in today’s workplace. It is a skill that takes a short time to learn in concept and a lifetime to master in practice.
In this session we will examine active listening as a skill that can be learned, practiced and mastered.
The session will cover:
  • What active listening is
  • Why it is so important
  • Why it is so difficult to put into practice
  • Specific active listening techniques
  • Intentional practice with feedback
Join us for a fun, interactive session and leave with new techniques and a whole new appreciation for this important skill that is foundational for team collaboration and success.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Awareness of the value of active listening to team success
  • Awareness that it a skill that can be learned and practiced
  • How to use a variety of active listening techniques
  • How to observe active listening in others
  • Practice employing active listening techniques and getting feedback
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Susan DiFabio

Susan DiFabio

Agile Coach, Susan DiFabio Consulting
I am an independent Agile coach focused on helping teams and organizations find success applying Agile principles. I spent many years on project teams performing roles ranging from developer to designer to project manager to product manager. During that time I witnessed first-hand... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Chesapeake 1/2/3

10:45

Elements for True Collaboration: The Rise and Fall of a Creative Collaborative Community (Nic Sementa)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Discover the essential elements for building a truly collaborative environment and how leveraging Agile through this approach can lead to more profit and sustainability. Join us on the journey of creating Chicago’s first creative incubator and hear the story of the rise and fall of this creative collaborative community. Sometimes just providing the environment for collaboration is not enough. After iterating upon the failures and embracing the lessons exposed, we’ll uncover the elements for a truly sustainable collaborative environment.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Hear a case study of the development of a truly creative collaborative community
  • Explore opportunities made possible through collaboration
  • Discover two blockers to sustainable growth and collaboration
  • Learn the importance of Agile and specifically how small dedicated teams can be positioned for successful collaboration


Speakers
NS

Nic Sementa

Agilista, Formula Ink
As a serial entrepreneur, Nic Sementa has co-founded a series of companies including one of Inc Magazines top 500 fastest growing businesses (a credit card processing start-up in 2007), nationally distributed college magazine Boosh, and a community based artist incubator RGB Loun... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac 5/6

10:45

Waterfall Theater: Understanding Emergence through Performance (John Krewson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
"The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams." Most people read this and focus on the self-organization element of the principle. But what about the concept of emergence? How do requirements "emerge" exactly? And how do self-organizing teams enable emergence?
In this highly interactive workshop, we'll get a hands-on lesson on emergence and self-organization using an unlikely source of inspiration: The theater. During the 75 minute session, attendees will envision, write, rehearse, and perform one-minute episodes of "Waterfall Theater". Throughout the process, we'll discover the difference between emergence and specification, the benefits of iterative and incremental delivery, and the power of a self-organized team with a shared goal.

Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this session, attendees will
  • * have a hands-on understanding of emerging requirements and design
  • * understand the relationship between emergence and vision
  • * be a part of a self-organizing team
  • * understand the role that trust plays in self-organization
  • * build something iteratively and incrementally



Speakers
avatar for John Krewson

John Krewson

Agile Transformation Lead, MasterCard
John Krewson (@johnkrewson) is the Agile Transformation Lead at MasterCard and a consultant whose expertise is based on real-world experience rather than regurgitated dogma. His communication skills, patience, and Agile experience blend into a unique style that is both approachable... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Chesapeake 1/2/3

14:00

A Sense of Place: Unlocking Team Collaboration with Creative Workspaces (Jorgen Hesselberg, Cindy Coleman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The world of work is changing before our eyes. Agile has highlighted the need for intense communication and collaboration, yet our work contexts are becoming more global, multi dimensional and diverse than ever before. This requires a different set of work patterns - to support a culture of innovation, how people connect, and teams' capacity to disrupt. But what does this look like, exactly? What is the design language and the physical real estate implications of tomorrow's workplace? We'll discuss concrete ways to help alleviate some of the pains while amplifying the opportunities inherent in today's work environment and provide examples of how leading concerns are addressing the challenges. Heavy on visual illustrations, examples and performance impacts, this talk is relevant for any organization considering a move to a high-performing, collaborative workspace.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - Recognize how demographic, social, technological trends mesh to affect the needs and wants of our people and their work environments
  • - Understand how workspace design can amplify the strengths and dampen the challenges of a highly diverse, sometimes distributed work environment
  • - Be able to articulate the financial impact and productivity effect of effective workspaces
Attachments:


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 13

14:00

Benefiting from Conflict - Building Antifragile Relationships and Teams (Jake Calabrese)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Antifragile relationships provide the foundation & freedom for teams to benefit from conflict and be more successful!
Teams and organizations, at least successful ones, are based on relationships that "work." People need to be free to collaborate and interact with others on their teams and in their organizations. We should be moving beyond strong relationships to antifragile relationships, which benefit from adversity! We will explore this concept by learning about and practicing a number of tools you can use with teams you are on or working with (scrum teams to leadership teams).
Help your team(s) move towards a space where they can thrive. Tap into practices to continue moving your relationships to a more antifragile position to improve your results and success. We will practice building a team alliance and plan for potential conflicts in advance. We will also explore a number of common issues contributing to toxic team situations as well as antidotes. Like agile, antifragile relationships is a journey and mindset. The ideas we will explore will first focus on ourselves, looking at what we can bring to the table and what we can do and be. Expect to work individually and with others in this interactive workshop.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - Learn what it means to have an antifragile relationship and it's impact on team and organizational success.
  • - Learn and practice a number of tools to continue moving your relationships to a more antifragile position to improve your results and success.
  • - Go beyond simplistic behavior based team charters and learn to create your own Team Alliance (scrum teams, leadership teams, product teams, etc.) that focuses on what each individual will bring to the team.
  • - Build on your Alliance and learn how to create a Conflict Protocol provides a framework for dealing with conflict before it arises.
  • - Understand team toxins, the value of them, and how antidotes create ways to benefit from conflict.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jake Calabrese

Jake Calabrese

Agile Systems Coach & Trainer, Agile For All
I love to help people reach those breakthrough moments by noticing and become aware of new information to tackle opportunities and challenges. I'd love chat about systems coaching, human behavior, lean, scrumban, unscaling, agile superpowers, systems intelligence, or really whatever... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

Freedom to work (Hadi Hariri)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Three people founded JetBrains over 15 years ago. Today, with nearly 600 people, we have multiple award-winning products and offices in many locations around the world. Yet despite the growth we’re still rooted on our key core values: hiring good people and giving them the freedom to work.
At JetBrains we don’t have open floor plans. People need their private space. We don’t have working hours or timesheets. People come and go as they please. We don’t ask for reports and we certainly don’t micromanage. There’s pretty much no hierarchy and the idea of command and control is non-existent. Leadership is born out of respect from peers.
But as with everything, there are also challenges. In this talk we're going to look at the pros and the issues, and how we face some of these.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Provide experience on how we cope with:
  • Remote work and teams spread across multiple offices
  • How to deal with meetings (or lack of them) when people come and go as they please
  • How to deal with lack of process
  • The challenges of providing this kind of freedom
  • Keeping communication going as a company becomes large
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hadi Hariri

Hadi Hariri

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer and creator of many things OSS, his passions includes Web Development and Software Architecture. Has authored a couple of books, a few courses and has been speaking at industry events for nearly 15 years. Currently at JetBrains leading the Developer Advocacy team. Spends... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 4/5
 
Friday, August 7
 

09:00

Agile Hiring: It’s a Team Sport (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When you think of hiring for your team, does the paperwork overwhelm you? Are you concerned about the number of interviews you seem to need to make a great decision? Do you ever have trouble making a decision, to know if this candidate is right for you--the team, the project, and the organization? You know the cost of hiring people is high, and the cost of not getting the right person is even higher.
You can apply agile to your hiring, iterating on everything and learning about your hiring with feedback. Learn how to involve the entire team, including the sourcing. Collaborate with your recruiters when they use a kanban board to track candidates and where they are in the process. Iterate on the job description (and job ad) based on what you see in candidates. When you involve the entire team, you can create questions and auditions that work. Learn how to identify candidates who fit your culture and those who don't.
This session is a timeboxed interactive workshop. Let's make your hiring more agile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - How to organize the hiring process to take advantage of iterating and feedback
  • - How to collaborate with the entire team
  • - How to help the recruiters be agile and lean with boards
  • - What to look for in a candidate
  • - How to ask questions that get at the essence of what you need in a candidate
  • - How to create auditions that reflect your culture
  • - How to hire for cultural fit
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac C

09:00

Does this FizzGood? Improve velocity, predictability & agility by asking a simple question (Jon Terry, Daniel Norton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
LeanKit's founding team had a strong Lean-Agile background from previous careers. So, in the early days of the company, we just instinctively did things in a Lean way with as few formal processes as any startup. But, like any growing company, we eventually did have to start clearly defining how we do things. And like anyone, we were tempted to become more bureaucratic - with lots of scheduling, coordination, meetings and estimates.
Instead, we developed our FSGD (Frequent Small Good Decoupled) approach. This LeanKit way of working has provided our teams with a simple yardstick for making effective decisions without a lot of cross team scheduling and coordination. It has simplified abstract Agile concepts into something everyone easily understands and cheerfully applies on a daily basis.
FSGD isn't a replacement for Scrum, Kanban, XP, etc. We strongly believe in and spend lots of time teaching our teams about Lean and Agile principles, tools, and techniques. But FSGD distills what we think are the key decision making elements of those methods into something everyone can remember.
We have seen significant improvements in our delivery speed across multiple teams since rolling out the FSGD approach. We'll share those results with the audience and help you get started learning to do what Fizz-Good.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Our goal for the session is to help other teams gain the same benefit that we have. We hope attendees can go home right away and apply the simple FSGD approach to their work.



Speakers
avatar for Daniel Norton

Daniel Norton

Chief Mobile Officer, LeanKit
Daniel Norton is a founder at LeanKit where he leads several development teams. His previous engagements include native mobile app development with a small software consultancy and technical leadership at a large healthcare provider. Daniel is a polyglot with a passion for mastering... Read More →
avatar for Jon Terry

Jon Terry

Chief Evangelist, Lean-Agile Strategy, Planview
Jon Terry is Chief Evangelist, Lean-Agile Strategy for Planview, a market leading provider of portfolio management, agile management, collaboration, and ideation software. Before that Jon was co-CEO and co-founder of LeanKit, which pioneered the application of Kanban in knowledge... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac 4