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Enterprise Agile [clear filter]
Monday, August 3
 

15:45

Did We Buy or Just Lease the Agile Car? (Matt Anderson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
It is no secret that more and more companies are adopting Agile. The challenge is that many of them treat it like buying or leasing a car. They take the Agile car for a test drive, like how it handles and then make the purchase/lease without considering the total price of the vehicle over the lifetime of the investment.
When the Agile car is only leased, it is a business liability that has a planned obsolescence. The company throws money at a short-term problem that they will plan to replace with whatever the next model will be once the lease runs out. Maintenance and care will be invested at only at the level that meets the lease agreement. This short-term approach prevents the cultural all-in strategy that Enterprise Agile requires.
If the Agile car is bought, it becomes a capital asset. It can depreciate depending on what make and model is purchased or it can become a long-term asset that increases in value. Maintenance is included as part of the expense of ownership and is based off of the planned longevity of the asset. Corporate culture is modeled to embrace Agile as a core decision-making tenant, not just for development purposes but across the Enterprise.
Matt Anderson will discuss the common challenges that a sustained enterprise agile adoption will encounter over time and ways to overcome them to ensure the corporate Agile car stays in top condition and is an asset and competitive advantage to the company.
Based on lessons learned at Cerner Corporation, Matt will discuss how to handle sustained enterprise challenges like:
1) Re-organizations
2) Annual Planning
3) C-Suite prioritization shifts
4) Team changes
5) Burn-out and Cargo Cults
6) Suboptimization within organizations that decreases enterprise throughput
7) Leadership power struggles
8) Mergers and Acquisitions
While Kaizen is the desired maintenance approach, Kaikaku "accidents" happen that require some major repairs or restoration. Enterprise Agile has to handle both smoothly to truly be an competitive advantage. This has to be a core competency within the organization, independent of reliance on external consultants.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to:
  • Diagnose potential problems at the enterprise level
  • Determine which tool to use to perform the necessary maintenance. This goes beyond the generic "hold a retrospective" or "collaborate" answers commonly given.
  • Have confidence that Enterprise Agility is not a buzz-word or temporary fad and is attainable and worth the investment
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

09:00

Not Doing SAFe? No problem. Not doing these? Big Problem (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
SAFe has attracted a lot of attention. While its detractors claim it is mostly good marketing, it is actually because SAFe addresses many key issues in Agile at scale that are ignored by virtually all of the current popular approaches. This talk presents what one must attend to regardless of one's approach. It then describes how these challenges are addressed in SAFe. Participants interested in scaled Agile in general or SAFe Agile in particular will find this talk of great value.
The talk discusses the following Agile at scale issues:
  • Why using a foundation of Lean-Thinking is essential
  • Why having explicit workflow and decision policies greatly increases learning
  • Why you must build quality in with Acceptance Test-Driven Development
  • Why it is important to delivery business incrementally
  • Have architecture epics be a peer with business epics
  • How to guide business value to be delivered in a hierarchy of portfolio, program, team and why this is necessary
  • Taking a four step process to large scale implementation 1) Use a portfolio kanban system to limit work on the development teams 2) Create cross-functional teams to the extent appropriate while organizing these teams so that they can work together 3) Adopt the appropriate work flow that includes test-first at at least the acceptance level and provides a common cadence of all teams to enable continuous integration 4) Use kanban to manage WIP at the front of the value stream
  • Have an owner for the development value stream
Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of the challenges facing an organization that develops software, either as a product or for IT
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
Potomac D

10:45

Three Things You MUST Know to Transform Any Sized Organization into an Agile Enterprise (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The deeper we go down the path of scaled agile transformation, the more we are learning that adding additional process and additional complexity can only ever get us part of the way there. At some point size and complexity is going to limit our ability to be truly agile. To be truly agile, we have to reduce size and complexity and move toward greater organizational simplicity.
The challenge is that large organizations ARE often complex and usually anything but simple. Most agile transformations get started by either ignoring the complexity inherent in the system or by wrapping that complexity in planning constructs that can help in the short run, but are ultimately doomed to limit your business agility over time. There has to be another way.
To really achieve agility at scale, we have to stop chasing more advanced ways to manage complexity and seek out more effective patterns for moving toward greater simplicity. In short, it’s not the end state of an agile transformation that we must stay focused on, it’s the systematic process of reducing complexity that is critical to achieving your ultimate business goals.
To transform any sized organization into an agile enterprise, there are only three things you need to know to be successful:
  1. You must have complete cross functional teams
  2. You must have clear backlogs
  3. You must have the ability to produce a working, tested increment of product on regular intervals.
Every other benefit of agile is impossible without creating these three conditions for success; everything that gets in the way of creating these three conditions is an impediment to your transformation which has to be removed; and your transformation roadmap should be solely focused on how your going to make all this possible in your organization. Until you make this happen... nothing much else is going to matter.
This talk will explore patterns for creating cross-functional teams at scale, what that looks like, what get’s in the way, and how to get there. We’ll discover why clear backlogs are so hard to create and what you'll need to do about it. Warning, this will not be easy! Finally, we’ll discuss why working tested software created on regular intervals is the secret sauce to actually getting the business benefits your organization is looking for.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn the critical importance of forming complete cross-functional teams, why many common patterns for forming teams fail, patterns for forming teams successfully, and strategies for progressively reducing dependencies between teams over time.
  • Participants will learn common failure patterns we see around creating backlogs, how the guidance contained in Scrum and SAFe can actually prevent some organizations from creating effective backlogs, and patterns for creating backlogs that really get teams moving quick.
  • Participants will learn what it really means to create a working, tested, increment at the end of every sprint, release, or PI. They will learn how making this kind of progress support solid delivery metrics, increases predictability, and earns the trust of the business over time



Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO and Founder, LeadingAgile
Mike Cottmeyer, LeadingAgile founder and CEO, is passionate about solving the challenges associated with Agile in larger, more complex enterprises. To that end, his company is dedicated to providing large-scale Agile transformation services to help pragmatically, incrementally, and... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Potomac C

15:45

Agile Capitalization: Invest in the Future (Dan Greening, John Horton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
In many companies, agile software development is misunderstood and misreported, increasing taxes, volatility in profit and loss (P&L) and costly manual time-tracking. Agile and Scrum teams inherently create production cost data that are more verifiable, better documented, and more closely aligned with known customer value than most waterfall implementations. Better reporting can mean significant tax savings and greater investor interest.
Explore the theory, benefits, regulations, and real-world examples of capitalizing software developed using agile practices. You will learn from members of the team that pioneered defensible agile capitalization practices in a $10B publicly traded company.
Leave with the understanding and resources to lead an agile capitalization effort at your company. Save weeks of research and investigation by attending this powerful briefing.
Learning Outcomes:


  • Improve the company’s P&L

  • Reduce or eliminate need to track actual hours

  • Free up working capital for innovation and growth in software development

  • Reduce future tax burden

  • Improve verifiability for internal and external auditors

  • Increase clarity for shareholders on investments and operational expenses


Attachments:


Speakers
avatar for John Horton

John Horton

Principal Consultant, Senex Rex



Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 12

15:45

So what do we do with the architects? (Ryan Bergman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
You’ve made the switch to agile. You stopped doing comprehensive documentation and you have self directed teams that value emergent design right?. Then you notice that you forgot to give the architects something to do. Architecture is an activity that all teams need to perform and you might just have some experienced individuals around to help lead and guide them. In this presentation we will talk about what software architecture is, how teams accomplish it, and where the people traditionally called “architects” fit in an agile world.
Learning Outcomes:
  • When finished, participants should have a clear understanding of the different activities that architects perform and how self directed teams can accomplish them.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Lead Product Engineer, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include architecture, security, application usability, CI... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

14:00

Entangled: Solving the Hairy Problem of Team Dependencies (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When portfolio and program managers undertake quarterly (or annual) feature and portfolio planning, understanding team dependencies is made necessary to identify constraints and avoid overburdening one team. Complexity quickly grows beyond intuition after two or three team dependencies are identified, rendering current forecasting techniques unsatisfactory. This session will discuss the inadequacies of current tools and frameworks used to manage the dependency planning problem, and introduce the choices you have for reducing the complexity and new planning techniques that untangle dependencies into a doable plan.
At the end of the session, attendees will have a new understanding of the complexity team dependencies add to planning, and have a set of strategies and techniques to predictably manage products built in high team-dependency organizations. This session looks at example dependency graphs and graphical matrix techniques that are quick to build and give clear risk insight.
It often shocks organizations to learn mathematically that each team dependency HALVES the chances of an on-time completion of component or delivery. With two dependencies, there is a 1 in 4 chance of no delay; with three dependencies, there is a chance of 1 in 8 delivering on-time. One large legacy application the author worked with had seven dependencies from a core library to a user interface – that is a 1 in 128 chance no team will be delayed (127 times more likely to experience one or more delays). Planning clearly needs to consider how dependencies might impact each teams ability to integrate and build.
It is not as dire as it sounds, not every team suffers the same chance of delay. We look at how to analyze historical examples of delayed work to identify types of features that will encounter dependency delays in the future. Building a map (linked graph) and matrix visualizations of team dependencies gives a basis for examining this historical likelihood of delay and planning team organization structures or staffing plans that compensate. It is possible to predictibly plan in high dependency environments, its just too hard to do in ad-hoc ways.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the impact of multiple team dependencies on planning and scheduling predictability
  • Introduce ways to identify and visualize dependencies for planning
  • Understanding current strengths and weaknesses of dependency management approaches
  • New strategies for minimizing the impact of dependencies and planning cross team capacity
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Introduction to Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS) (Bas Vodde)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS)
LeSS is a lightweight (agile) framework for scaling Scrum to more than one team. It was extracted out of the experiences of Bas Vodde and Craig Larman while Scaling Agile development in many different types of companies, products and industries over the last ten years. There are several case studies available and an upcoming book describing LeSS in detail.
LeSS consists of the LeSS Principles, the Framework, the Guides and a set of experiments. The LeSS framework is divided into two frameworks: basic LeSS for 2-8 teams and LeSS Huge for 8+ teams. All of these are also available on the less.works website.
LeSS is different with other scaling frameworks in the sense that it provides a very minimalistic framework that enables empiricism on a large-scale which enables the teams and organization to inspect-adapt their implementation based on their experiences and context. LeSS is based on the idea that providing too much rules, roles, artifacts and asking the organization to tailor it down is a fundamentally flawed approach and instead scaling frameworks should be minimalistic and allowing organizations to fill them in.
Introduction to LeSS
In this session, Bas Vodde and Craig Larman, the creators of LeSS, will be introducing some of the LeSS principles and run through the basic LeSS and LeSS Huge framework. This will be followed up with an interactive Q&A session with the audience.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What is LeSS?
  • What are the LeSS Principles?
  • How do the two LeSS Frameworks work?
  • Why should you scale up rather than tailor down?


Speakers
avatar for Bas Vodde

Bas Vodde

Odd-e
Bas Vodde is a coach, programmer, trainer, and author related to modern agile and lean product development. He is the creator of the LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework for scaling agile development. He coaches organizations on three levels: organizational,  team,  individual... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 10/11

15:45

The Sprint 3 Revolt - How our large scale transformation nearly failed (Raj Mudhar, Jason Alexander)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
At the start of 2014, we cut over 2000+ people at American Express from waterfall to a full agile concept and delivery life cycle. Confidence was high despite the risk. A year of diligent preparation had put all the textbook conditions for success in place: senior leadership was on board; employees were psyched; we had coaches on the ground; a well thought-out agile Software Development Life Cycle; and a continuous integration and delivery infrastructure ready to go. Expectations were managed for the whole organization that the first few sprints for the 40+ scrum teams would be turbulent. Then Sprint Three happened. A revolt erupted across our teams that threatened the whole transformation. The window of opportunity to get it back on track was dwindling. This talk lays out what happened, the five-WHYs behind it, the resolution, and what others can learn from our experience when embarking on a large scale transformation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Transformation Conditions for Success - what every large organization needs to succeed
  • Optimizing the Whole - How failing to look at the bigger picture can spell doom
  • Leadership - the importance of rapid response at the right time
  • Lessons Learned Summary - what you can do to avoid the mistakes we made, and a few things we did right along the way (including building an early warning system)
Attachments:

Speakers
JA

Jason Alexander

Head of Digital Delivery, Chase
Jason recently joined Chase to lead Delivery across the rapidly evolving Digital efforts of the bank. Prior to Chase, Jason led Product Development for Enterprise Growth at American Express. In his four years in Enterprise Growth, he led User Experience, Product Strategy and Planning... Read More →
RM

Raj Mudhar

Deloitte Canada


Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac 5/6
 
Thursday, August 6
 

09:00

Nine Immutable Principles of Lean-Agile Development at Enterprise Scale (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Software is consuming the world. Industries of all types are faced with growing competitive pressures that can be addressed only through more innovative and productive IT operations, software-based systems, products, solutions and services. Many of today's systems are of such complexity that they require hundreds, and even thousands, of practitioners to build.
As always, we, the software development community, have the responsibility to develop and deploy the next generation of practices than deliver better quality, faster. Fortunately, in addition to our traditional experience in building successful systems, we have access to new knowledge pools that can help us address this challenge. These include not only Agile methods, but Lean and Systems Thinking, and Product Development Flow.
In this tutorial, Dean Leffingwell will summarize some of this knowledge into a manageable and memorable set of nine core principles that can be implemented in any software business context. Building on Agile, Lean Systems Thinking and product development flow, the principles are:
• Take an economic view
• Apply systems thinking
• Assume variability; preserve options
• Build incrementally with fast, integrated learning cycles
• Base milestones on objective evaluation of working systems
• Visualize and limit WIP, reduce batch sizes; manage queue lengths.
• Apply cadence; synchronize with cross-domain planning
• Unlock the intrinsic motivation of knowledge workers
• Decentralize decision-making
Understanding and applying these critical principles can unlock significant business benefits, regardless of business context, development frameworks and specific methods of choice.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain an understanding of how these three new bodies of knowledge can be summarized, communicated and applied in a simple and effective way



Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

Chief Methodologist, Scaled Agile, Inc.


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 4/5

10:45

'Risk' - The final (Enterprise) Agile frontier (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
When exploring new ideas we often encounter new risks. This session looks at how Agile risk management needs to be lightweight, but responsive to known risks as well as previously unknown sources of risk. Building new things means encountering new things that go wrong. This session gives techniques that help identify risks early through faciltated estimation, survey crowdsourcing and historical data analysis. We then discuss how to prioritize risks based on a system impact approach and probabilistic simulation.
We do risky things all the time. Avoiding risk isn't a desirable outcome, there is value in risky ventures. We simply need to know what risks are WORTH taking. We need to take more "wise" risks than our competitors, and this session aims to define what "wise" means and how to identify them in your software development portfolio and projects.
Although risk management is thought of as boring and laborious, it need NOT BE! Agile risk management even when performed in a lightweigth fashion is key to avoiding un-intended losses - in time; in costs; in missed opportunities. If teams and organizations had a better grip on assessing their risk exposure, better decisions and fewer smashed expectation would follow.
This talk covers -
  • Where did risk management go in Agile?
  • Why traditional risk management doesn't work in Agile
    • Because single point likelihood and impact estimates - we need a range based approach
    • Because risks and delays compound and small delays propogate into large delays - we need a systems approach
  • How to find the risks that matter most
    • By asking the teams better risk identification questions and by using survey crowdsourcing
    • By looking at history and measuring occurrence and impact, and forecasting future impact
    • By using probabilistic techniques to weigh total project impact rather than isolated impact of any one risk
  • How to quantify risk impacts and make informed risk decisions
    • By financially quantifying things that go wrong - dollars talk
    • By using real option and decision tree techniques to move risk decision making down to the team level
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand Agile risk management goals and wher current techniques often fail
  • The problem with single point estimates of risk occurrence likelihood and impact for prioritization
  • Training and calibrating teams on estimation, and how poor human instinct is on risk estimation without help
  • How to elicit range estimates from teams and how to extrapolate the high end (tail risk - low probability but high impact)
  • Learn the basics about modeling, computing and communicating risk probability and impact
  • Learn how to put a dollar value on total risk impact through probabilistic techniques
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
National Harbor 6/7

14:00

Is there a best practice for an agile transformation? - No! – So what Now? (Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Companies and organizations are complex, adaptive systems. In this talk you will learn what this actually means and how you can use this to practically deal with your way through your (agile) transition.
You will learn why there are no best and no good practices, that you can just copy and everything is fine – and what the nature of an agile transition really is.
You will learn about an example of a successful agile transition and what factors made it successful.
And you will learn to use a tool I have developed, to find and analyze approaches to see whether they might be promising for you to try out. We use (and evolve) this tool at my company, Ericsson (24,000 people in R&D), since 1 ½ years and have found it very helpful.
The talk will introduce and make use of Systems Thinking and Complex Adaptive Systems theory. Many people struggle with applying these concepts practically in their daily working life. You will learn how to bring these great and promising theories “down on earth” and make them practically usable.
So, if you are on an agile transformation, no matter whether you are just getting started or whether you have progressed already: this talk will give you new insights and a very solid foundation - based on state-of-the-art leadership- and problem solving approaches – to make your journey more successful.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The essence and practical implications of Complex Adaptive Systems theory.
  • What it practically means, that an agile transformation is an emergent result.
  • The role of good practices in an agile transformation (and evolution).
  • A tool that helps to identify and distinguish potentially successful approaches/good practices from potentially unsuccessful ones.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a manager... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
Chesapeake 4/5/6

14:00

Symbiotic Practices for Agile Development (Michael Feathers)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Decades ago, Melvin Conway coined what is now called Conway’s Law: “organizations which design systems ... are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.” Conway’s Law is a deep insight but it is only the tip of the iceberg when we try to understand the interaction between organization and software. We fail to appreciate that we can use team structure, day to day process, and the interface between business and development as levers to affect the quality of design and code. With this perspective we can also see that concerns like technical debt and portfolio management lend themselves to new solutions when we understand software’s sensitivities upon its environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand Design Forces around Software
  • Understand the Laws of Software Growth
  • Appreciate the Effects of Agile Process, Build Process and Team Structure Upon Software Assets
  • Understand How Avert Technical Debt Through Organizational Intervention
  • Understand How to Monitor Software for Process Intervention
  • Understand How and When to Let Technical Criteria Influence Business and Organizational Decision-Making



Speakers
avatar for MICHAEL FEATHERS

MICHAEL FEATHERS

Author of Working Effectivley with Legacy Code, R7K Research & Conveyance
Michael Feathers is the Founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design. Prior to forming R7K, Michael was the Chief Scientist of Obtiva and a consultant with Object Mentor International. Over the past 20 years he has consulted... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 15:15
National Harbor 4/5

15:45

Keystone Habits Leading to Sustainable Enterprise Agility (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
From my experience of leading Agile Transformations in three Fortune 100 companies (over 2000 people per transformation), the sustainability of agile at an enterprise level is deeply linked to how the organization “transforms” to agile. We know that transforming an organization to become more agile requires more than just process change. Rather, it requires a complete culture shift. Sustainable, effective agile transformations affect all the elements of culture such as, leadership style, leadership values, work structures, reward systems, processes, and of course the work habits of people. How to affect that culture shift is the key question we will discuss in the session. We will present two different common transformation approaches (organizational-led and process-led) and then describe a hybrid version called culture-led transformation that is designed to change critical organizational and personal keystone habits to improve and sustain organizational agility. Throughout the presentation there will be stories from real companies who have used this approach.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain what an organizational Ecosystem looks like and why it is needed to enable sustainable organizational agility
  • Describe the two most common Agile transformation models (Project/Pilot/Team-Led and Process-Led) and why both of them may not be sustainable in large organizations
  • Understand the important and impact of focusing on the Human Elements of an organization during a transformation and the impact that has on the sustainability of Agile in the organization
  • Describe a new (and tried) model of enterprise agile adoption that focuses on transforming culture so that agile can be sustainable in the organization
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky

Head of Business Agility, Riot Games
Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. known as Doctor Agile, is a well-known thought-leader in the Agile community. He is currently the Director of Development Management for Riot Games and before that he was a transformation consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the co-author of Becoming Agile... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
Potomac C

15:45

Yahoo: Pulling an Elephant out of a Tarpit (Ed Kraay, Stas Zvinyatskovsky)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Yahoo is an Internet pioneer. Somewhere along the way, our size got ahead of our ability to execute to the point that we slowed to a halt. This is a story of a multi-year journey of us fighting back and regaining our groove: innovating and executing at warp drive speed.
Come hear lessons that we learned along the way, profit from our mistakes, avoid dead ends and frustration, cry and laugh with us.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to recognize how to leverage crises to increase speed and improve quality.
  • Participants will be able to distinguish between adoption of methodologies (Scrum, SAFe) and real agility, adapting to shifts in the market.
  • Participants will learn to shape their change strategy based on why they are going agile in the first place.
  • Participants will be able to spot trouble in their own agile adoption efforts.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ed Kraay

Ed Kraay

Technical Project/Program Mgr, Yahoo!
Ed has been at Yahoo for 3 years. His first job was a coach moving 1000 people all-in to modern software methods. He then worked to spread agile methods across Yahoo as a whole. He now works as a Program Lead for a large strategic project. Prior to Yahoo Ed was an coach for ThoughtWorks... Read More →
avatar for Stas Zvinyatskovsky

Stas Zvinyatskovsky

Managing Director, Accenture
Stas is a Managing Director at Accenture, where he helps companies achieve their dreams by implementing Modern Software Engineering. Prior to Accenture, Stas was a Distinguished Architect at Yahoo where he developed highly distributed and highly scalable software systems. While at... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:45 - 17:00
National Harbor 6/7
 
Friday, August 7
 

09:00

Scaling Agile with Open Space (Daniel Mezick)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Open Space gatherings arranged inside organizations are totally unlike the Open Space events you may be familiar with during public conferences. As described in the book SPIRIT from Harrison Owen, Open Space is actually designed to enable development and transformations in organizations. This session is about how to leverage Open Space to scale Agile across the enterprise.
At the root of effective Agile is the self-managed team...a self-organizing system. At the core of Open Space is the power of self-organization. In this sense, effective Agile adoptions and Open Space are very, very similar.
During this session I will present narratives, pictures, videos and testimony from C-level people as well as team members. Each will describe how Open Space inside their Agile adoption literally changed their lives. Of particular interest are the stories executives tell about how they learned to let go and trust their people to provide everything the Agile adoption needed to succeed at scale.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to apply Open Space for ensuring effective Agile adoptions
  • Understand how to bring executives into the self-managed world of Agile and Open Space
  • Gain knowledge of at least 7 experience reports detailing various approaches, tools and techniques



Speakers

Friday August 7, 2015 09:00 - 10:15
National Harbor 10/11