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Research [clear filter]
Monday, August 3
 

15:45

Synthesizing Continuous Deployment Practices Used in Software Development (Akond Rahman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Continuous deployment speeds up the process of existing agile methods, such as Scrum, and Extreme Programming (XP) through the automatic deployment of software changes to end-users upon passing of automated tests. Continuous deployment has become an emerging software engineering process amongst numerous software companies, such as Facebook, Github, Netflix, and Rally Software. A systematic analysis of software practices used in continuous deployment can facilitate a better understanding of continuous deployment as a software engineering process. Such analysis can also help software practitioners in having a shared vocabulary of practices and in choosing the software practices that they can use to implement continuous deployment. The goal of this paper is to aid software practitioners in implementing continuous deployment through a systematic analysis of software practices that are used by software companies. We studied the continuous deployment practices of 19 software companies by performing a qualitative analysis of Internet artifacts and by conducting follow-up inquiries. In total, we found 11 software practices that are used by 19 software companies. We also found that in terms of use, eight of the 11 software practices are common across 14 software companies. We observe that continuous deployment necessitates the consistent use of sound software engineering practices such as automated testing, automated deployment, and code review.
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Monday August 3, 2015 15:45 - 16:15
National Harbor 8

16:30

Stakeholder Perceptions of the Adoption of Continuous Integration – A Case Study (Maria Paasivaara)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Continuous integration is an important support mechanism for fast delivery of new features. However, its adoption in industry has often been problematic, partly due to social challenges. However, there is little knowledge of the exact nature of the challenges, and how different stakeholders perceive the need for and adoption of continuous integration. In this paper, we describe how the introduction of continuous integration was perceived by different stakeholders in a R&D program at Ericsson. The case provided a rare opportunity to study the adoption of continuous integration in a large distributed organization. We interviewed 27 stakeholders and found differing perceptions of continuous integration: how suitable it is for the organization, how adoption should be organized, and whether it is possible to achieve sufficient quality through automated testing. These differences of perception were mainly consequences of the geographic distribution. Based on the case study, we propose three guidelines. First, understand that the product architecture has a significant effect on the adoption. However, do not let architectural problems keep you from implementing continuous integration. Second, give the team members sufficient time to overcome the initial learning phase in the adoption. Third, avoid centralizing competencies to individual sites, and invest in crosssite communication.
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Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
National Harbor 8
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

09:00

Understanding Digital Cardwall Usage (Judith Brown)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
In Agile software development, key artefacts used to support the process are the User Story (usually recorded on a Storycard) and Story Cardwall (usually a dedicated portion of a wall). These low-fidelity tools work together to help teams stay focused and self-manage their projects. The need to support distributed teams and team members makes the physical Cardwall impractical and teams are therefore migrating towards digital story management tools. We conducted field studies of 8 Agile teams using digital Cardwalls, and performed qualitative data analysis to understand patterns of usages and user needs. We identify issues to address in the design of digital Cardwalls.
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Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
National Harbor 8

09:45

Visual Management and Blind Software Developers (Avelino Ferreira Gomes Filho, Rodrigo de Toledo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
With the popularization of Agile methods for developing and managing software projects, many organizations have been using visual management tools for planning, executing and evaluating their activities. These visual management tools range from simple information such as goals and deadlines to support all data required to represent the entire development process. The benefits are transparency, communication, engagement, simplicity and process awareness. However, these tools have a drawback: they are inaccessible to the blind. This paper presents an action research about the adoption of Agile methods with visual management by a software development team that includes a blind programmer, describing the difficulties encountered and how they overcame them.
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Speakers
avatar for Avelino Ferreira Gomes Filho

Avelino Ferreira Gomes Filho

Agile Coach, Knowledge 21
I am a software developer that went through all IT steps. I started in 1998 with microcomputers maintenance. In 2000 I became a programmer, and since that, I played the role of developer, systems analyst, project manager, Scrum Master, Product Owner, functional manager and Agile Coach... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:45 - 10:15
National Harbor 8
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

10:45

Research Short Papers (10 Minute Presentations) (Rafael Prikladnicki)
Abstract:
Join us for 6 short Research presentations:
  • Symbolic Innovation in Agile Transformation - Doug Rose
  • The Impact of Human Factors on Agile Projects - Aline Chagas, Melquizedequi Santos, Célio Santana, Alexandre Vasconcelos
  • Is Agile Portfolio Management Following the Principles of Large-Scale Agile? - Maarit Laanti, Mirette Kangas
  • Development of Complex Software with Agile Method - Alan Braz, Cec´ılia M. F. Rubira, Marco Vieira
  • Gap Analysis Between State of Practice & State of Art Practices in Agile Software Development - Abdul Rauf, Mohammed AlGhafees
  • A Lean Design Methodology for Business Models and Its Application to IoT Business Model Development - Masahiro ide, Yukio Amagai, Mikio Aoyama, Yasuhiro Kikushima
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Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 12:00
Open Jam

14:00

The Prevalence of UX Design in Agile Development Processes in Industry (Tina Oevad)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The gap between how the academic world develops usability and user experience (UX) methods, and how the industry employs these methods is perceived as both broad and deep. But is that the real picture – and has there been a change in how companies work within these fields over the past two years? By conducting interviews with eight companies, this paper tries to answer these two questions. The companies were initially interviewed in 2013 and by follow-up interviews in 2015 the paper draws a picture of how the companies work with UX and usability in an agile development environment. We identify the challenges they are facing and if, and how the work progresses. We found that the UX maturity during these two years had changed significantly. This was revealed by the fact that almost all of the companies in 2015 had implemented or were in the process of developing a UX strategy together with more formalized UX processes. They also allocated more resources to conduct UX and usability work than earlier. We found that all of the companies made use of low-fi prototyping, followed by usability testing, workshops, personas, expert evaluations, user or customer journeys, customer visits and user task analyses. Almost all the companies carried out development using the Scrum framework. All of the companies were interested in the idea of agile UX, and found the idea of using the developers as a UX resource interesting. This, together with an idea of modifying existing usability methods to be used in an agile, industrial setting could be a solution to bridge the gap between academia and the industry.
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Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
National Harbor 8

14:45

Managing Technical Debt in Software Projects Using Scrum: An Action Research (Frederico Oliveira)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Ward Cunningham in his experience report presented at the OOPSLA'92 conference introduced the metaphor of technical debt. This metaphor is related to immature, incomplete or inadequate artifacts in the software development cycle that cause higher costs and lower quality. A strategy for the technical debt management is still a challenge because its definition is not yet part of the software development process. Carolyn Seaman and Yuepu Guo proposed a technical debt management framework based on three stages. First, debts are identified and listed. After that, debts are measured by their payment efforts and then debts are selected to be considered in the software development cycle. This study evaluates the application of this framework in the real context of software projects adopting Scrum. Action research is conducted in two companies where their projects have significant technical debt. We performed three action research cycles based on the three stages of the framework for both companies. The main contribution of this paper is to provide real experiences and improvements for projects using Scrum and that may adopt the technical debt management framework proposed by Seaman and Guo. Both teams recognized that the proposed approach is feasible for being considered in the software development process after some modifications. Because of projects time constraints and ease of use, we reduced the use of the proposed metrics to two: Principal and the Current Amount of Interest. In consequence, decision-making was benefitted by the early consideration of the debts that really need to be paid. Instead of using probabilities to find the interest, these are registered every time the technical debt occurs. During the first phase, the debts identification was improved when all Scrum roles participated, while measurement and decision-making were improved when the team was responsible for these phases. The Product Owner role in both companies understood the importance of Technical Debt monitoring and prioritization during a development cycle. With these changes, the two teams mentioned they would remain using the resulting approach.
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avatar for Frederico Oliveira

Frederico Oliveira

Coordenador de Projetos, SIDI (SAMSUNG Instituto de Desenvolvimento para Informática)
Graduado e mestre em Engenharia de Computação, também com pós-graduação em Gerenciamento de Projetos e Engenharia de Software. Possui as certificações OCA Java 7, Scrum Master (SCM) e Management 3.0. Foi palestrante na Agile Conference 2015 em Washington/EUA, além nos eventos... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:45 - 15:15
National Harbor 8
 
Thursday, August 6
 

09:00

Explaining Agility with a Process Theory of Change (Michael Wufka)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
While agile approaches have been widely adopted, our theoretical understanding of their foundations and impacts remains limited. This is due to conflating two entirely different meanings of “agile.” We therefore unpack these two meanings and present our tentative understanding as a process theory. The theory posits that agility emerges from a dialectic interplay between recognizing and responding to needs for changes. Meanwhile, rather than directly affecting success, agility moderates the negative effects of need for change on success. Viewing agility this way helps address the research-practice gap by highlighting the need for skepticism of methods and practices, and by suggesting practically relevant research questions.
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Thursday August 6, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
National Harbor 8

09:45

Lean CMMI: An Iterative and Incremental Approach to CMMI-Based Process Improvement (Amr Noaman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Software Process Improvement (SPI) projects incorporate organization transition risks which may cause many process improvement initiatives to fail. To mitigate these risks, an iterative and incremental approach called ‘Process Increments’ is used to manage the SPI project. In this paper, the Configuration Management process area is used as a case study to show the improvement results difference when the ‘Process Increments’ approach is used. Results are compared with similar projects which didn’t use an incremental approach. This approach shifts the focus from adopting new techniques to achieving value-add for the organization and shows excellent results in effective and efficient implementation of Software Configuration Management. Through our proposed process increment model, we could reach a significant increase in the performance of the software process improvement.
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avatar for Amr Noaman

Amr Noaman

Co-Founder & Principal Consultant, Agile Academy
Over the last 7 years, Amr’s primary role was to spread agile awareness and lean thinking in software organizations in Egypt and the Middle East. Amr is the co-founder of Agile Academy and Egypt's Lean & Agile Network, one of the largest Agile communities in the Middle East. | In... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:45 - 10:15
National Harbor 8

14:00

Cognitive Apprenticeship to Prepare Students for Communication-Intensive Software Dev (Charles Wallace)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
We report on our efforts to enhance our undergraduate computer science and software engineering curriculum, promoting what we term agile communication through practice in inquiry, critique and reflection. We are targeting early courses in our curriculum, so that students internalize agile practices as part of their personal software development process. Our approach constitutes a cognitive apprenticeship that engages students in authentic software settings and articulates processes that are traditionally left implicit. Communication-intensive activities are woven through this curriculum in a variety of ways. The POGIL framework provides a structured approach to inquiry. Automated feedback on test coverage, programming style and code documentation are provided through WebTA, a novel tool that we have integrated into the Canvas learning management system, providing communication by proxy that supplements instructor feedback with continual critique of code and documentation. A program of guided inquiry through real case studies of software communication prepares students for their team software activities, and a series of reflective exercises leads them to focus on their own team communication practices.
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Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Chesapeake 10/11/12

14:45

Predicting Release Time for OSS based on the Generalized Software Reliability Model (Hironori Washizaki)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
There is a significant challenge that how to predict the possible release date of the target software having enough reliability in agile development where incremental development and small software releases are key characteristics. Existing approaches targeting agile development usually use release backlogs for predicting and setting delivery windows; however these do not consider the reliability of software for release date prediction so that there is a possibility that software at the predicted release date have poor reliability. Previously we proposed a generalized software reliability model (GSRM) based on a stochastic process and compared it with other models to evaluate recent software developments. However, we, did not directly evaluate the accuracy of the predicted release time by model. In this paper, towards prediction of release dates in agile development, we focus on the release dates of open source software (OSS) developments and the number of detected issues (faults) since OSS developments comply well with the definition of the agile development in terms of incremental process and frequent releases We define the accuracy of the predicted release time using the given development terms and the number of issues. Additionally, we propose a method to evaluate the accuracy of the predicted release time. In the best case, GSRM shows only 0.572% Error Rate, which corresponds to a predicted release date of two days prior to the actual release date. We believe that our method should be applicable to agile developments too.
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Thursday August 6, 2015 14:45 - 15:15
Chesapeake 10/11/12